References

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Art References

  • These references are for what various pieces of art in a particular deck or cards refer to other, in game cards, characters, events, or decks. So if you see a character on a card in Absolute Zero's deck, and you know who that character is, put it here.
  • This does NOT include art references to real world inspirations. Those go in the final section

Unconfirmed

  • These are for what could be true, that the community has come up with as generally accepted, but has not yet had a stamp of approval either from one of >G members, or from actual card proof.

Confirmed

  • Put here any facts that have been confirmed by >G members, with a link if possible to the post/podcast/article/whatever. Hearsay from the mouth of >G Members is OK to put here, because they don't say anything they don't want revealed, and can always deny it if it's not true.
  • Most Podcast Story information should NOT end up here - it should go on the relevant name/Comics page tabs.

Questions

  • These are the Questions from various podcasts as recorded on the Podcast pages. This category automatically collapses to preserve space.

To Other Works

  • This section is for real world (ie, our real comics of Marvel and DC and others) that the characters are drawn from. Any connection to Real world, either in the art, the backstory, or the events should be placed here.
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Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Absolute Zero/References

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Artwork

  • "Frostbound Drain" has the character Char in its artwork. Char is found in The Block environment deck.
  • "Coolant Blast" has several clones of Proletariat in the background.
  • "Fueled Freeze" seems to take place in Insula Primalis.
  • "Glacial Structure" has Akash'Bhuta trapped in ice.
  • "Impale" shows Absolute Zero attacking Omnitron.

Confirmed

  • Prior to the release of the Wager Master deck, Absolute Zero was the only hero whose face hadn't been fully revealed in any Sentinel Comics merchandise; at that point, his face had gone unseen for nearly four years.
  • "Anyway, in the Iron Legacy future, Absolute Zero's (Elemental Wrath Promo) cold powers have begun to manifest physical ice-shields to protect himself, both augmenting and replacing the suit as the ice-shields grow. You can see on the front of his card that his helmet and chestplate mostly remain, as well as other small armor bits, but he's encased in ice and uses this new ice-armor to protect himself from heat and from attacks. However, his powers are fundamentally attempting to protect him from any heat whatsoever, and he is using all of his strength and will to maintain control. On his card back, Absolute Zero is incapacitated due to combat - he has lost control of his powers, and they have run amok! Ryan Frost is entirely encased in meters of ice. He cannot move, but he is safe from heat. And his powers are doing everything they can to keep him safe forever."[1]
  • Baron Blade during the Mad Bomber story goes to the Freedom Five HQ with the intention to kill Legacy with the death ray while the other heroes are dealing with the bombs, but Absolute Zero dives in the way and takes the shot - one of the first times that AZ displays the selfless "hero" quality.[2]
  • His relationship with Tachyon is the closest friendship within the Freedom Five. [3]

To Other Works

  • Absolute Zero's suit bears a passing resemblance to the Iron Man armor.
  • Absolute Zero's pun-based secret identity (Ryan Frost), origin, and powers are all very similar to DC villain Mister Freeze.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

    • What character has evolved the most during the creative process? This would be Absolute Zero - when they were first drafting out the characters and stories for the game one of the characters was one called Absolute Zero who had cold powers. He was just kind of a "blaster" - like a cold version of Ra. Over the course of development they decided that his story was more interesting than that backstory (as was his suit) and so needed more interesting mechanics to match. They fully scrapped his story and mechanics at one point - retaining the name because it's cool [heh], but also developing his personality around that - how much his life is just a series of rock-bottoms and who sees himself as "nothing". How uninteresting the Golden Age AZ was is a reflection of this design process and how boring the first iteration of the character was.
    • How do his mechanics match up with the comics world? When he's dealing himself fire damage, that's just because he's letting warm air into his suit and the reaction that has near his skin sets off a chain reaction that lets him blast a lot of cold outward. There's no understandable scientific reason for this to work - their own brilliant scientist character can't figure out how his powers work - "Look lady, all I know is fire gets all weird around me."
    • If room-temperature air is "like fire" to him, how does he survive having his suit blown up as it seems to in most major stories? The guys are really mean to him story-wise. He does learn how to patch the suit with ice, or cool the air around him. He also learns to take the damage and just deal with it, not giving up. They also do an art review before recording to see what stuff they need to talk about and even they noted just now many of his appearances deal with his stuff getting broken. He's handy from a comics storytelling standpoint in that you can show violence towards him without gore (tearing up his suit instead of his body).
    • His bio mentions that he spent 2 years in the cryo-chamber before joining the fight; assuming this is the same room as in Freedom Tower, do people just not talk about the guy hanging out in the cold room all the time? Was it set up elsewhere? Not the same cryo-chamber - this would have been back in the old FF HQ days that predated Freedom Tower. This was a military/medical facility. After he joined up, they had a bunch of cryo-chambers set up for his use (emergencies, etc.).
    • Is there a reason he doesn't have a major nemesis of his own? Touched on earlier in that he doesn't have a lot of solo-heroics going on in which he could develop a nemesis.
    • How does he spend his down time? What sort of entertainment options does the cryo-chamber have/how big is it? Did Tachyon have to develop special equipment that could operate at those temperatures? Does Ryan put the suit on occasionally just to get out for fun? He puts on the suit for fun a few times, but it's by no means a common thing. Tachyon builds a record player that can output into the cryo-chamber directly (no speakers system) so he can listen to his vinyl collection without wrecking it. He writes a lot, too - journal-style. He's probably their most introspective character. A lot of the later AZ stories are about him as somebody intrinsically disconnected from the world.
    • In the Baron Blade episode it was mentioned that he took the death-ray blast for Legacy and that his super-cooled state kept the blast from having any effect; since he's in such a state, does he need to eat? Does he miss simple stuff like that? Did he feel awkward at Legacy's cookout? He doesn't eat, he doesn't breathe, doesn't really sleep (although can go into something like a coma to recover his energy after a fight). He misses all of this stuff. Later he comes to appreciate his friends and purpose in the world, but definitely misses "being a person". He has a greater appreciation for the stuff he still can do, though (like reading or listening to music). He doesn't feel comfortable in social situations (like the cookout), but he still likes to (occasionally) take part in some of them - not without his normal grumbling, though.
    • Biographical discrepancies! In the digital version of the game bios one lists his hair and eyes as white, others black hair and brown eyes, but he's often shown as having no hair in the game art. Can he even grow hair at this point? They should definitely show white for both. He still has eyebrows and he is capable of growing hair, but only very slowly (and what does grow is very wispy and brittle). He can just run his hands over his head/face to break the hair off so as to not have to deal with it.
    • The flavor text on "Impale" mentions a comic A Day in the Life: Absolute Zero where he and Legacy are arguing, what's going on in this one-shot and what are they arguing about? It's a fairly late comic in his story. There are a bunch of "Day in the Life" issues, mostly surrounding Freedom Five-related characters. This one involves a big fight against Omnitron and AZ putting lots of big ice structures across sections of Megalopolis - this is doing a good job containing Omnitron and its drones, but also endangers bystanders that Legacy then has to go save (causing the argument). Late in the fight, AZ just wants to leave - he already had plans for that afternoon and had already told everybody that he was busy. He thinks that the team has things well in hand and just leaves (Tachyon intervenes with Legacy telling him that it's a rough day for Ryan). AZ goes to a second-hand store that employs ex-cons in a work-release thing and asks a guy if he remembers Christine O'Neil. The guy (the drunk driver who killed her) sputters a bit and Ryan calms him, just wanting to talk about how its been 30 years since she died [that seems like a long time in "comic book time" to me, we get a rundown of around 17 years between the her death and when he started being a hero - 5 as a janitor, 10 in a coma, 2 in the cryo-chamber - but whatever] and how much things have changed, and to tell him that he's glad that he's getting back on his feet and making peace with him in general.
    • It seems harsh to make him "pay" for the suit by being a hero, why couldn't they have worked out some other way for him to pay for it or why couldn't Tachyon just chalk it up as an experiment? Any other of this kind of morally-gray, semi-coercive things the FF has done? It's not the Freedom Five extorting him, but it's part of the government (kind of an extension of the same programs running the Ironclad project and Fort Adamant). The other members of the FF want the best for him and they aren't the ones doing the coercing.
    • Would AZ count as "powered" in Citizen Dawn's accounting of things? Yes. She probably wouldn't bother trying to recruit him, but if he showed up on her doorstep wanting to sign up she'd take him. The suit isn't his power, it just allows him to more readily use his innate power.
    • Has anybody bothered studying why fire gets all weird around him? If not, is it out of respect for his privacy? Tachyon definitely spends a lot of effort studying him and it's one of earth's greatest scientific mysteries. At first he just wants to leave him alone, but as they become friends he helps out more.
    • In the ARG Event, we see him talking to his therapist about Writhe as a person outside his "super" persona; is AZ more social than he seems, making a point to get to know the others as people or was that just Writhe in particular? He really is that standoffish loner that he seems to be, but he saw a kindred spirit in Writhe and how people react to them (and both are middle-aged, a lot of the Sentinels cast skews older than "normal" in comics) and that got them talking to one another about life.
    • What was his dream job mentioned in his bio? He has always loved music, writing, and writing about music and he has a degree in journalism and the dream job was (in the '70s) getting a column in Rolling Stone covering blues and jazz and the influence of those in the music world.
    • Has he ever had the opportunity to interact physically with somebody without the suit since he got his powers? No - he's too cold, any physical contact would give frostbite immediately.
    • Has he tried dating again since his fiancée died? He hasn't had any romantic storylines throughout the Multiverse era until the near the end, after he's become a bit more personable, he's getting out there in online dating. He's got to be up-front about who he is and the limitations inherent there, though. He's not so much looking for a "romantic" partner as he wants more human connections.

Sources


Aeon Girl/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • From Podcast 74
  • In an earlier episode, it was mentioned that Aeon Girl can change her form easily, so why maintain the Aeon Man motif? That's how she looks - "species" is the wrong word to describe it, but it's a useful metaphor to say that that's what her species looks like. She's not so much a "shapeshifter" archetype so much as doing things like height/weight/density control or body augmentation, but it's not what she's doing in combat. She can pick what she looks like, but it's mostly just cosmetic.
  • Lifeline used a bunch of OblivAeon energy to create Aeon Girl, but now that she's her own entity, does she have some finite amount of energy? She doesn't have an "infinite" amount of energy, but her power source is nebulously defined - she can exhaust herself, but she can recharge by just existing and drawing in energy from the cosmos.
  • How does Aeon Girl keep up such a shining smile? Are there other Aeon People still around? Any other "reformed" ones? There are no more Aeon People out there. She was created out of the same kind of energy as they were, but she's her own thing. She is "overly pleasant", outgoing, very curious. Judgement is not a prominent trait for her?
  • Any "torches and pitchforks" mob reaction to Aeon Girl considering how much she looks like those guys who were trying to destroy reality a little while back? Why did she become a superhero? After her creation she was basically just left with the Freedom Five (who then formed the Sentinels of Freedom). She's not really out in public much and she has disguises for when she needs to be (plus if she puts on clothes she just has the hair and skin tone to set her off, neither of which is too far out there (and in any event, the Aeon Men didn't have visible faces like she has so the hair/skin thing isn't enough to draw the comparison in the first place). What she inherited from the Aeon Men thing is the orange outfit with blue energy lines, which isn't an uncommon color combo in general.
  • Seems like a strong mentor figure like Scholar or NightMist would be useful to help Aeon Girl navigate the process of becoming sentient, but since they're both unavailable, who does she turn to? The Freedom Five, mostly. Time Slinger. They teach her some, but she learns a lot of "how to be a person" from Daybreak. She's not lacking a basic sense of morality - she started with that and so avoids a lot of the dangers in common "created being" stories.
  • How does Aeon Girl interact with the rest of Daybreak? Other heroes? Is she respected in general or do people hold her origin as OblivAeon energy against her? Unlike Muse, a lot of heroes are concerned about her origin. People out in the world aren't aware of what she is, but the heroes keep an eye on her. They also know, however, that they need to be cautious about it as they don't want to do anything that might turn her evil (say, being discriminated against just for existing). She gets along well with Daybreak - the rest of the team kind of adopt her as a project; it's their job to make sure she turns out as a good, fun person. Like, she just went to class and did her training, they took her out to get pizza and see a movie.
  • Given the comics industry's reticence to permanently kill off bad guys, is there any semblance of OblivAeon lurking in her psyche? She's made entirely out of OblivAeon energy - that is not the same thing as OblivAeon's consciousness [that sounds more like Progeny's deal]. The analogy made a while back is that she's made out of OblivAeon's blood, which isn't the part of you that makes decisions. It's probably fine.
  • Is Aeon Girl aware of her origin from Aeon Girl? She knows the facts, but not really what that means (which will probably come up eventually).
  • Does she hear voices from OblivAeon? No.
  • Does she ever reach out to Lifeline? Yes, but with zero success so far.
  • What can she do with her cosmic powers? How does this compare with OblivAeon shard-empowered people? She can fly, shoot beams of blue energy from her hands, alter her density, absorb energy (an aside at this point to say that she's not only cosmic energy, but something close to infernal due to the connection to Lifeline). She's probably more powerful than most people who have picked up OblivAeon shards in terms of raw power ("one of the most powerful characters"), but she has no conception of what her limits are or how to make use of it.

Sources


Aeon Master/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Akash'Thriya/References

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Artwork

  • The silhouetted figure on "Living Rockslide" is the Chrono Ranger. This was vaguely foreshadowed on the Chrono Ranger card "By Any Means."

Confirmed

  • Akash'Bhuta is the largest playable villain in the Sentinels card game.
  • Akash'Bhuta has the most HP of any Sentinels villain.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page 30 - Akash'Bhuta, Akash'Thriya, and more!:
    • The Argent Adept episode mentioned that Akash'Bhuta first appeared in the Virtuoso of the Void book and that the Prime Wardens first formed in FFA #10 in the early-'80s but existed for a while before they got their own title, but in the Unity episode it was mentioned that FFA #11 was in the mid-'90s - does that mean that there's a whole decade without a Freedom Five Annual issue being published? Yes - as has been mentioned previously it's not an "every year" title, just "at most once a year". Gaps in publication happen (and even the numbering is weird in that sometimes it'll be published with the year instead of a sequential issue number that people would have to go back and count in order to figure out which number they're actually on).
    • Akash'Bhuta's first appearance is listed in several places as being Prime Wardens #1 which looks like a '90s comic, but how can this be given the timeline we were given in the AA episode? Is this a technicality in that she wasn't given a name or something until then or similar? Nope, this is a genuine mistake made by the guys - when they saw this question they went down the rabbit hole of information sources publicly available and even discovered that their internal documents has this error - it was never the case that PW #1 was her first appearance, it should be listed as Virtuoso of the Void #12. It's an even worse error in that PW #1-3 tells what's really the last Akash'Bhuta story given the next time we see her is when she's coaxed into becoming Akash'Thriya.
    • How long has she been around? 250,000,000 years.
    • Has she been around long enough to know who Gloomweaver was before becoming Gloomweaver? Yes, but she wouldn't care and hadn't been keeping track of humans because they didn't matter until the Virtuosos showed up in which case she only cared about them and then cared more about recent heroes - it's a change in her time-scale of attention that happened too recently for her to care about Gloomweaver.
    • Has she tangled with any of the other long-lived heroes (like Ra or Haka) in the past? No, she was generally slumbering/recovering.
    • Can she leave Earth? Akash'Bhuta could not (too tied to the Earth itself), but Akash'Thriya can (and does!) due to the intrinsic change she had to make to become Akash'Thriya.
    • Where'd the name come from? It was given to her by the ancient Sumerians.
    • What does the "Akash" part of the name mean? "Akash" isn't a word with a specific meaning, but has to do with consuming/devouring but also with the land itself.
    • Does she come into contact with Citizen Dawn (citing the dinosaurs on a card) and are they in a similar weight class? Akash'Bhuta and the Citizens of the Sun don't fight or really interact. Dawn is a little weirded out when Akash drains the life energy from the organisms there. They're not in the same weight class - although Akash is more powerful she's not at all ambitious like Dawn is. Dawn's lesser (although still impressive) power, her association with other powerful people, and her drive towards specific goals probably makes her a more dangerous villain, though.
    • We know that she takes on a few different forms/names - are there other, older names/forms we haven't been told about yet? "Akash'Bhuta" is her first name from the pages of Sentinel Comics - prior to humanity she had no name and didn't manifest in the familiar form we expect from the game materials. Going from void-spirit-guardian to the amalgamated nature spirit fighting the shadow creatures involved some major changes, but once the process settled down there wasn't really a manifested "form" to speak of until she started aping early humans' appearance.
    • What's going on in the card "Entomb"? The art implies that the heroes are being petrified (which would take them out of the fight) but the card just does damage and only even sticks around if somebody doesn't take damage, so what's really going on? It's not turning them to stone, it's turning them to wood - the process takes time (and is painful, thus the damage) and the heroes have to break out of it, which theoretically they do (which is why it goes away).
    • Akash'Bhuta seems to be an avatar of the Earth and a unique creature, why does she appear humanoid in the first place? Why female? She decided to do this - she probably doesn't see herself as female as concerns of "gender" are beneath her to begin with - as an expression of the fact that she embraced the "mother nature" label that ancient humans assigned to her.
    • How much free will does she have? Is her role of "destroyer" one that she has to play out? She didn't have much free will initially as a Void spirit, but she has plenty of it by the time she became known as Akash'Bhuta. She's represents the "chaos" of the natural world, but she's also a protector of it and therefore opposing OblivAeon is right up her alley. She does gain some measure of empathy in her transition to Akash'Thriya, but there's also a major amount of humbling that went along with that transition.
    • Her power comes from the Earth, but it's also said that she can take power from the Void, how strong is her connection to the Void and how does it differ from the connection of the Virtuosos? What happened when she became the Spirit of the Void and what did she give up to do so? What she "gave up" has kind of been discussed in that she became more like she was in her origin. She no longer has a connection to the Void since she severed her connection to the Nexus when she buried it/sealed it away. She can draw Void energy through a conduit (like from Franz Vogel), but she lacks the ability on her own for most of her existence.
    • It's been hinted that she's changing into something new; how does this affect the relationship between her and the Virtuosos? More discussion of this in the future section as the nature of the relationship differs between the reality.
    • On "Allies of Earth" we see her doing something to dinosaurs, what's going on? She wasn't killing the dinosaurs (and there are plenty of them on Insula Primalis anyway). [They don't actually specify what she was doing to them, but from the card effect I'm guessing that she is doing the life-force draining thing mentioned in the Citizen Dawn part earlier.]
    • During OblivAeon, she gives some of herself to the Void, the same source of energy as her nemesis - does this change how she looks in the future? Do we see a Sky-Scraper-sized avatar of the Void running around? No, because she dies. A lot of the impetus for this question is addressed earlier (her relationship to the Void in general).
    • It was mentioned that the Virtuosos of the Void have unique color signatures and Akash'Thriya's Spirit of the Void form looks a lot like Argent Adept's silver - are those related? Her Void form's color isn't coming from the Argent Adept, her form is coming from the Void itself and she looks a lot like she did at the beginning and the similar color is coincidental.
    • Does she come into being fully intelligent and knowing her purpose is to wreck up the place? How does the first Virtuoso defeat her? Does the rivalry start there or is it tied into her being? Most of this is covered - she came into being knowing that she needed to protect the Nexus and her personality developed more over the next 100 million years of war, leaving her with more desire for independence. The only reason she opposes the Virtuosos is because they're aligned with the force that wants her to return to her original state. The first was able to defeat her because he had direct access to the power that created her and was, basically, able to "blast her with herself".
    • Could she control a rain forest from Russia or is she restricted to her immediate area? She has a local "presence" and can't really control things that are too far distant. She can "travel" through the Earth to somewhere else very quickly, but that's not the same as controlling things remotely. She doesn't really need to manifest in order to "be" there.
    • Do her worshipers show up a villains at some point? No, that was a very long time ago in the pre-Virtuoso era.
    • What changes her from vines to lava forms? When she gets really angry. These different forms are related to the aspects of the spirits she consumed way back in the long war and she uses ones that are appropriate for what she's up to (she started as mostly "earth" but absorbed, like, a plant spirit and a lava spirit and so on).
    • Is she angry with Lifeline for trying to blow up 2/3 of the planet? Yes.
    • What city did she blow up in "Rejuvenating Entropy"? It's only a part of a city and she was doing a lot of destruction stuff as part of that Prime Wardens arc, but the specific one shown on the card is Dubai. It's not like when Atum blew up an entire city.
    • Will she still be fighting Virtuosos of the Void or are they cool now? That's another future question.
    • <ship>Akash/Naturalist?</ship> They can see a world, where OblivAeon stuff didn't happen, where it's possible that there could be a version of her that's more human where it could happen. Not in any of the canon timelines.
    • What is her motivation in destroying stuff? She represents nature overcoming the achievements of humanity over time, her personality is something of "fanatic purifier", she kind of resents all things man-made. She's not really out to "rule" the planet because she kind of is the planet.
    • It was mentioned that other planets don't have Akashes or Virtuosos, but do other planets have something like Akash? The only thing that's like her are Void Spirit guardians for the Nexus. In other realities there might be more things that followed a similar route to power (defending spirits consuming one another, etc.) but it was this weird confluence of events that led to her, specifically.
    • On "Disrupt the Field" we see her taking a swing at Young Legacy while Omni-X watches, what universe/timeline is this taking place in (is this one where Baron Blade killed Paul Parsons VIII and/or is this the one that Omnitron took over, etc.)? This card's art is from the universe leading to the Iron Legacy story as the comics showed scenes from both iterations of events (Blade killing Paul or Blade killing Felicia) that got there eventually. It's mostly just showing that, Hey, here's Felicia as Legacy fighting Akash in Megalopolis since these were all familiar people/concepts (that is, it's an isolated panel/a few panels rather than a major story). There is an Omnitron in this universe, but it's not the "same" as Omnitron X.
    • What's her motivation re: the Naturalist's backstory/initial transformation? She was sleeping - his company was damaging the environment and in her state of slumber she reached up into his dreams, threw a spark of magic at him, and went back to sleep. It took much less effort than manifesting would have.
    • She doesn't have a visible mouth, can she talk? She doesn't have any quote on game cards, but in the video game she has intro dialog, so is that a mistake? She can "talk", but it's not by forming a mouth and making sounds with those mouth parts, but she could cause vibrations in the environment to "make words happen". Progeny does not and cannot talk. She doesn't have any quotes on cards because she rarely has any reason to communicate with humans, but as Akash'Thriya she does so more often. It's not psychic communication, but it's not like "normal" hearing either - it's more that the vibrations she causes travel up your body and you hear it in your head.
    • Is she responsible for AA's original incap art? Are the skulls present from people she killed? It's a comic book cover and there's a long tradition of covers showing stuff that doesn't necessarily happen to get you to pick it up (and fake-out character deaths and whatnot).
    • What prompts her to grow/shrink or change her form? Taking a small form to caress a bound AA seems more of a human reaction and you'd think that the lava form would always be a good defense against heroes trying to smash her limbs so why not always be lava? Some of the form stuff was mentioned earlier and it's not like the vine form stuff is necessarily always going to be less damaging that lava, so she changes as appropriate for what she's trying to do at the time (plus there's a lot of artistic license reasoning going on - "which look is cooler for this image?"). Everything she's manifesting is "her" as much as any of the humanoid bodies. The size change stuff is likewise more for drama than anything - it's as much storytelling for comics purposes as anything else. She's smaller as Akash'Thriya because she's more limited in that form, but it's also easier to interact with people that way.
    • Is the change necessitated by the damage Professor Pollution was causing the first big change in her eons of existence? Pretty much already answered, but yes this is the first change to her in the pages of Sentinel Comics.
    • In the video game, the nemesis dialog with Argent Adept leading the heroes implies that she's devoured past Virtuosos; what are the consequences to the planet when she's victorious over the Virtuosos? The only two she devoured were Franz Vogel who she got sneakily after he defeated her by implanting that conduit between them as mentioned. The second was the would-be first American Virtuoso, the fiddler mentioned, who Akash was able to awaken earlier than usual and so got to her before she could even really get started (even though she wasn't a Virtuoso yet, Akash was still able to benefit through the natural Void connection present and so was able to "consume" at least something there).
    • How does a being made of earth and plant matter consume/devour anything? It's not the same as biological "eating", it's a matter of feeding on their energy and power, not their bodies.
    • What would the consequences to the world be if she were destroyed? She couldn't be "destroyed" as long as she was able to retreat into the world itself. Destroying the world would certainly do the trick. However, when she was in danger of being corrupted by Professor Pollution she chose to change her being into Akash'Thriya, a much more fragile form that lacked that safety net, but is more adaptable. However, the planet doesn't depend on her existence however - without her it goes on just fine.
  • Future:
    • The divergence of the two timelines happened before her doing the Akash'Flora thing and so the tree only exists in one of them - so therefore her trip to the Nexus and becoming the Spirit of the Void only happens in the RPG timeline. In Tactics she fights OblivAeon, takes a lot of damage, and winds up reverting to an older form - burrowing down into the Earth with an expectation that she'll be gone for centuries again while she regenerates. So...
    • Tactics - she winds up regenerating faster due to the acquisition of some OblivAeon shards. The place that she is resting happens to come into contact with a bunch of them, and this unstable power source changes her. She becomes even more unstable and dangerous. She becomes less a creature of nature and more one of pure destruction. She only really has three forms at this point. And you can see the recorded livestream of Adam doing art of Akash'Dharsha here. In this timeline, she's definitely still fighting the Virtuoso of the Void (and is particularly furious with him) and is straight-up a villain.
Tachyonicon.png
Tachyon Speeds By to Remind You!

This information is from the Sentinel Comics Universe, one of two branching universes. Products in this timeline are: Sentinel Comics RPG.


  • The Void-Form of Akash'Thriya is dead, but it's not like Akash'Whatever has a brain, so the chunk of her that was used to make Akash'Flora is still her and Argent Adept is taking care of her and she is helping him find other instruments and communicating with him a bit. There's not much else going on, but they did get spoiler questions: Is the communication between them two-way or more like talking to your dog? It is two way, but it's not like it's happening with words. At first she's even kind of dumb since she's, y'know, a tree. Is it communication in a way that anybody else could even understand? He's the only one who can hear her at present. She could communicate with new Virtuosos if any show up. Could she communicate using any part of the tree? She can sense what's going on around her through any part of the tree, but the communication gets easier the closer you are to the trunk. Does she lose leaves in autumn and/or do the seasons effect her powers? 'Powers' are tricky because she's a tree - she looks like a deciduous tree, but she keeps her foliage year-round and doesn't grow like a tree would. You could cut it but it would be very difficult given how big and tough it is, but counting rings wouldn't tell you anything. Will she continue to fight Virtuosos? There's no animosity between them at this starting point.

Sources


Ammit/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • Ammit doesn't seem to get out much (especially outside of Ra stories) - what's she doing in Bugbear's deck? She's in Bugbear's story operating in her wheeling-and-dealing of power mode - finding people with power who don't necessarily understand or appreciate their power (and Bugbear fits this to a T). In the story involving Nightmist he winds up banished from reality and Ammit made a deal with him previously that resulted in this (deals with bad consequences being a common theme with her). More on Bugbear later, but keep this in mind.
    • What is Ammit (how does she fit into how the other Egyptian-themed characters operate)? She's a monster. Not a "god" like Ra or the Ennead (or an old entity like Anubis). She kind of started out as a pet of one of the entities that they had summoned ages ago and she acquired power over the ages, but she never drew the attention of anything that would try to destroy her and so she stuck around. She's very cunning and good at flying under the radar and is only just now starting to make a more overt play. I'm sure nothing will come of/could go wrong with this.

To Other Works

  • Like Ra and The Ennead, Ammit is a figure in actual Egyptian mythology. She fills the role of "eater of the dead" - when Anubis weighs the heart of the dead against the feather of truth, if the scales don't balance the heart is fed to Ammit. This results in the soul of the deceased to be restless for all time as they are unable to continue to the afterlife.

Sources


Anubis/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • The Tomb of Anubis description mentions that not all of the Egyptian "deities" are people empowered by Relics, calling out Anubis - if that's the case, what's his deal? Does he judge over all the dead, or only when there's Egyptian magic weirdness going on? Does he have it in for Ra or the others? What happens when he's incapacitated? He's not really the "god of the dead" as there really isn't one of those in the setting - he is are guardian of the gates of the underworld and there isn't necessarily only one gate (or even one underworld), but he tries to keep things in there from escaping and to keep people from going in and out. Similar to the other "deities", he's a powerful entity from ancient Egypt that was once a person, but unlike the others, he never died to pass his power into his Relic (until OblivAeon) - that is, he didn't acquire his power *from* a Relic like Ra or the Ennead did, but once he dies that process *begins* as the Rod of Anubis becomes the same sort of empowering artifact.
    • Did Anubis ever interact with the Cult of Gloom or Biomancer? How does his power level compare to Gloomweaver? Biomancer is not raising the dead and so doesn't really factor in to Gloomweaver's or Anubis' shtick. Goomweaver and Anubis are aware of one another, but only really interact in one issue of Ra's book where Gloomweaver tries to draw on Anubis' connection to the underworld to power more zombie shenanigans. Ra intervenes.

To Other Works

  • Like Ra and The Ennead, Anubis is a figure from actual Egyptian mythology. He's the god of cemeteries and of embalming - frequently shown overseeing the process of mummification. He was later also depicted as a psychopomp, guiding the souls of the dead to the afterlife. Part of this process involved an act of judgement; the heart of the dead would be weighed against the feather of truth. Failing this test would result in the heart being fed to Ammit and the soul being unable to proceed to the afterlife.

Sources


Apostate/References

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Artwork

  • In his "Infernal Emissary" form, Apostate has only one scar, which is visible on his torso. In his "Dark Corruptor" form he has numerous glowing scars all over his body.
  • All of Apostate's cards show him smiling, as opposed to Fanatic, his nemesis, who is always frowning.
  • Apostate's "Condemnation" and "Apocalypse" cards mimic Fanatic's "Absolution" and "End of Days" cards respectively.
  • "Remorseless Provocation" Features forum user pwatson1974 as the poor mook being stabbed.

Confirmed

  • Despite having a blade for an arm, the "Relic Spirit" has no offensive capabilities, card mechanically

To Other Works

  • Apostate's status as a demon and his physical appearance paint him as an homage to the demonic villains that were popular in 90's comics.
  • The "Orb of Delirium" may be a reference to the "Orb of Confusion" from the Spongebob Squarepants cartoon series.
  • The Flavor text of the card 'Fallen Angel' is the lyrics to Dio's song Fallen Angels - Similarly Fanatic's Holy Nova is from Holy Diver

Sources


Argent Adept/References

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Artwork

Confirmed

  • Confirmed by Christopher during a Q&A session: The Argent Adept is a direct reference to the character Kvothe from The Kingkiller Chronicle by Patrick Rothfuss. In the the book Kvothe is described as having fiery red hair, and a major scene involves him playing his lute to earn an honorific, one that includes a set of "silver pipes." (A small brooch showing a pair of silver pipes, representing his talent as a musician.) A Kvothe promo card for the Argent Adept was displayed at the Vengeance release party, with the lowest starting HP (23) of any hero excluding The Sentinels.
  • Dr. Blake Washington, the alter-ego of Ra, is featured in the flavor text of "Xu's Bell."
  • This was the hero deck that required the most effort by Christopher.[1]
  • Virtuosos of the Void whose names, place of origin, titles, and instruments are known:[2]
    • Akpunku, a woman in Africa, The Amber Accompanist, Drum (AA's deck)
    • Telamon, ancient Greece, The Cerulean Sorcerer, Lyra (AA's deck)
    • Xu Li-hua, Han-dynasty China, The Jade Jinx, Bell (AA's deck)
    • Eydisar Ragnarsson, Scandinavia, The Sallow Skald, Horn (AA's deck)
    • Tomasina Musaragni, a nun in Renaissance Italy, Sister Saffron, Harp (AA's deck)
    • Anthony Drake, bartender from California, The Argent Adept, Pipes (AA's deck, but this is AA himself)
    • Franz Vogel, Germany, The Crimson Conductor, a conductor's Baton carved with rose thorns (the Carbon Adept in Biomancer's deck, plus the "Dark Dynamics" variant of AA's character card - Franz got involved with Blood Magic).
    • Ruairí O'Ceallaigh (pronouned Rory O'Kelly), Ireland, The Chartreuse Chanteuse, Fiddle (Tactics)
    • Argent Adept’s birthday is listed as February 15th which is also Christopher’s brother Anthony’s birthday. Anthony is also known for writing the “Christopher and Adam reading letters to you” theme song.

To Other Works

  • "Inspiring Supertonic" portrays Mr. Fixer fighting a robotic version of Baron Blade. This "Blade-bot" is likely a reference to the "Doombots", the robotic doppelgangers of Marvel Comics villain Dr. Doom.
  • Kvothe Six String from The Kingkiller Chronicle by Patrick Rothfuss.
  • The art on Argent Adept's Virtuoso of the Void original incapacitated side is an homage to Wolverine crucified in a similar manner on the cover of Uncanny X-Men #251.
  • The Argent Adept has some similarities with Marvel's Doctor Strange, as well. Both have alliterative titles representing a position held: Virtuoso of the Void vs. Sorcerer Supreme, both wear long capes and are often shown hovering around a conflict, both use collections of older relics to aid them, and when using their power there is often glowing effects around their hands.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page 29 - Argent Adept:
    • What exactly is the Void (we're told that there's just the one Void in the multiverse, but after OblivAeon and the timelines are closed off from one another, how does the Void factor into that)? If it's a "void" how do things live there? Why does it need a Virtuoso? Is it related to the nowhen/nowhere that Chrono-Ranger was stuck until La Comodora picked him up? Chrono-Ranger was not stuck in the Void - he was stuck outside of reality and while the Void is a weird part of reality, it's still part of reality. Every reality has its own The Void, but all The Voids are the same (as in, they always operate the same) - the Void is intrinsically linked to physical reality (each to its own physical reality). It's a place, but also an energy/force - the Virtuoso isn't required by the Void, but they're humans who have learned to use the Void; it's not like the Void calls them to a purpose. Even the border between the Void and reality is vague "like jelly in a cheesecloth" it just kind of seeps in. It's a place of magical and psychic energies, but it's not the source of psychic or magical power (except for the Virtuosos who learned to harness it) - although people like Nightmist might use it as a power source to fuel their other magical abilities. In short - it's weird.
    • In the Nightmist and Gloomweaver episodes it was mentioned that the Void is separate from, but connected to all realities - post-OblivAeon, does the Argent Adept suffer from some power loss due to the separation of all realities? Does his connection to the Void mean that he could still work out some means of traveling to another reality? This goes back to the previous question, but brings up something that may have been less than clear in previous episodes - while every reality has a Void, and each of those Voids works the same way, they are still separate instances of "Void"-ness and so the end of the Multiverse doesn't really have an effect in these ways. Also, Virtuosos have an intrinsic link to the Void that is inalienable to them - it's not like he has access to a "little" of it or a "lot" of it, he just has access to it.
    • Between AA, Nightmist, and Harpy who has the most connection to it? Have they talked about it? AA is connected to the Void. Full stop. The other two have had contact with the void and have used it somewhat, but they're just magicians who use spells and happen to have done some Void stuff - they're not "connected" to it. Void effects are different than quote-unquote "magic".
    • How does the Void pick its Virtuoso? It is not sentient and doesn't pick the Virtuoso. Being attuned to it is more of a natural aptitude than anything, and somebody has to be both naturally attuned to the Void and have a natural aptitude for music to be a Virtuoso - a rare combination even in terms of the one-in-a-million level of rare that is Void attunement itself.
    • Does the Virtuoso even have to be human? No - you'd need to be sapient. There's an argument to be had that even an AI could be a Virtuoso, but an alien with the right attributes are certainly capable.
    • Nightmist entered the Void and gained power thereby; could anybody do this or would you have to already be somebody who could use magic? You'd have to have some magical ability to survive there considering the inherent danger of being there (you'd also need magic to get there in the first place, but it's possible that somebody else could send you there if you lacked the ability yourself).
    • Can it just pick a person to give power to become a Virtuoso? No, as mentioned it's not sentient.
    • Could it be a power source for RPG characters? Yes.
    • Why is the Virtuoso of the Void a music-themed position? Does it have to do with the creative/logical dynamic involved in music? Yes, there is something about Void energy that music just tunes in to - it's an expression of both art and math and an innate talent for that is necessary to even hope to be a Virtuoso.
    • It's stated that when picking up an Instrument a new Virtuoso would learn what goes with that title, but do they get knowledge of how to play that instrument or did Anthony have to fumble around with the Bell for a while first? Do the powers come from the instruments themselves or are they more of a focus? They don't give you an automatic knowledge of how to play them, but he has an innate talent for music and connection to the Void. That's part of the deal with how long it had been between Virtuosos and the fact that, normally, the previous one is around to teach the next. It was chance that Anthony even went to the exhibition and was exactly the right person who had the attunement and aptitude to even have this work out in the first place. The bell is fairly straightforward - the Lyra took him somewhat longer to learn as it's more complicated, but he was still able to pick it up relatively quickly given his natural aptitudes/attunements. Their power doesn't come from their instruments, they create their instruments with their power (see backstory above for the creation of "Drake's Pipes").
    • In the Tachyon episode it's mentioned that magic doesn't have reproducible results, but his seems pretty consistent; what's going on? It's because his abilities are Void effects rather than "magic". Analogy to Jazz - there's a lot of precision to be found in something that's entirely improvised. Behind the scenes: Christopher and Adam learned about music together when young and their knowledge and love of music goes back a long way - it was important to them as they built out the setting details/talked about the Void, and created this character.
    • What does AA think of Nightmist and Harpy (citing the chaotic/orderly differences)? Does he ever notice that Unity's powers are actually magical? AA is not a student of "magic" and is not a teacher of anything - he's trying to learn what he can from the instruments about the Void. He might run into a magician and try to get info from them, but then quickly realizes that it operates entirely differently from what he does and so they can't teach him much. He might recognize that Unity's stuff is magic, but he's not able to tease out why and he's also not the type to even bring it up to explain it.
    • AA seems like the hero most focused on supporting others (having limited abilities to deal damage himself) - is he a solo adventurer or is he reliant on a team to be properly effective? Was this the case for previous Virtuosos? He's not really a damage-dealing sort of person, but he still is focused on neutralizing threats. What he does in the card game isn't necessarily a good representation of his non-team efforts. In solo books he rarely is dealing with "fightable" issues and so deals with it in other ways.
    • On several cards we see him shooting beams of some sort, what's going on? First a single 40-card game deck is incapable of showing off everything that a character as complicated as a Virtuoso of the Void is capable of. He can to pretty much anything with Void energy and so it's hard to encapsulate this mechanically. When we see these energy beams, they're not doing "energy damage" - they're not doing damage at all, most likely, but they're the outward manifestation of his music/Void power doing something in the aforementioned "threat neutralization".
    • Who/what is the "Silver Shadow"? It's a Void form that he can summon to aid him in the playing of music (kind of a "clone" of himself that he conjures to play an instrument). This is separate from the "play all instruments at once" trick and doesn't drain him.
    • How do his powers "Vocalize" and "Conduct" work? Vocalize represents the fact that Anthony Drake is a singer and can summon some Void energy even without using an instrument. Conduct might be using Void energy to play an instrument rather than doing so himself.
    • It's been mentioned that Anthony Drake is asexual, is that true? Has he had a romantic relationship? Yes, he is an asexual, aromantic character. This wasn't written into his character from the beginning in the '70s, though. It was the case that, unlike virtually every other contemporary hero, he didn't have a character written in as a love interest - his stories just didn't really allow for it. It was a later writer that decided that this meant that he was asexual/aromantic. He has had no relationships in the comics.
    • Virtuosos used to hand down instruments, if things hadn't gotten screwed up by Akash, who would have been Anthony's mentor? Virtuosos wouldn't be passing down instruments. There isn't any person who "would have been" his mentor - the "screwing up" of things that Akash did didn't disrupt some kind of destiny/lineage thing. The mentor would have taught him and helped him form his own instrument (and may have given him an instrument to use to get things kicked off).
    • Since "argent" means "silver" is/was there a Aurum (Golden) Adept? No. Each Virtuoso had a color associated with them for comic book reasons. More on past Virtuosos later.
    • What's the significance of the "hero" being associated with the Void opposed to the "villain" associated with Nature? Have any Virtuosos been more evil? The first bit more of a topic for next week. There has been one malicious Virtuoso - but even he stood against Akash'Bhuta to protect the world - he was just also more selfish and power-hungry; The Crimson Conductor. More on him in the discussion of other Virtuosos below.
    • How is the title/role of Virtuoso passed down? Going back farther than recorded human history there has been a Virtuoso of the Void. Occasionally there's more than one around at the same time. There's frequently one training up one or two (or very rarely three) new ones. The requirement is an innate musical aptitude and innate attunement to the Void combo is exceedingly rare which limits the chance that a Virtuoso would meet more than a few candidates in their life. Prior to the gap leading up to Anthony Drake becoming one, there hadn't been a time without a Virtuoso of the Void, but more on that next week.
    • His bio said that previous Virtuosos passed on their instruments, does that mean that each one creates their own instruments? Does he share that ability and/or if all instruments are destroyed is that the end of the Virtuosos? With the merging of the timelines, has the "main" Argent Adept learned of any other Virtuosos? It was mentioned that he met the Void-forms of past Virtuosos, but he doesn't meet any as people. Some more in the Future section, but in the card game timeline he's self-taught.
    • In the Ra episode it was mentioned that the first powered person on Earth was a Virtuoso - is there something about angry nature spirits opposed to musicians tied to Earth specifically or could there be Virtuosos on, say, Dok'Thorath? Akash'Bhuta is unique to Earth and so the dynamic happening with Virtuosos is unique to Earth too. Different planets have different things wrong with them.
    • Can we hear more about his connection to previous Virtuosos? His relationship is more with the connection to the Void that they left to him via their instruments rather than to their individual personalities/experiences.
    • How did he choose the pipes as his instruments? It's funny since he's a vocalist and he chose pipes - he realized that these instruments were a means to power and so thought back to the instrument he'd played most recently: a recorder back in middle school. He's much better at these pipes than he ever was with the recorder, though.
    • Did he have any musical experience or interest prior to the encounter with the Bell? He was in a series of bands prior to becoming a hero, but hadn't found the right group. He always wanted to do something with music, and eventually figured it out.
    • Are there any surviving instruments from prior Virtuosos that he hasn't found? Yes.
    • The Dark Conductor variant shows him with a thorny baton also wielded by the Carbon Adept, is this an actual Instrument? How did Biomancer get it? This is a good place to talk about the various Virtuosos (many of whom we see in the Toll of Destiny flashback montage and then not again until OblivAeon). The first instrument was Akpunku's Drum, owned by a woman in Africa - the Amber Accompanist. Telamon was an ancient Greek Lyra player - the Cerulean Sorcerer. Next was Xu Li-hua in Han Dynasty China - the Jade Jinx. Eydisar Ragnarsson was a Norseman - the Sallow Skald. The Italian nun Tomasina Musaragni during the Renaissance was Sister Saffron. Last we have the German Franz Vogel - the Crimson Conductor who had a baton covered in thorns, representing the darkness within him and his lust for more power. He did a dangerous thing - mixing Void power with Blood Magic. Biomancer has been around a long time and has known about the Virtuosos for a long time (ask more about him for his own episode). After fighting Biomancer and the Carbon Adept, AA gets the baton and finds it's a real "instrument", but it changes him. This isn't a comprehensive list of Virtuosos or their instruments, it's just the ones whose instruments Anthony Drake has and whom he deals with.
    • Does he ever contact previous Argent Adepts for training? First off, he's the only "Argent Adept", but no he doesn't contact previous Virtuosos beyond the events already discussed.
    • How does he feel about Akash'Thriya being "good"? He's initially wary, but overall pretty pleased with how things turned out. He's not interested in fighting opponents, but in removing threats and having his greatest foe being on his side is a pretty killer way to have them not be a threat.
    • Do Virtuosos generally get curb-stomped immediately or is he unique in this regard? He actually does worse than general given that he's self-trained.
    • Did previous Virtuosos work with a team like the Prime Wardens? There have been teams consisting of multiple Virtuosos but not typically team-ups with other heroes.
    • [Sign-off referring to The Kingkiller Chronicle by Patrick Rothfuss] This is a series (currently standing at 2 novels with a third fothcoming, a novella about a side character, and a short story about another) about a character named Kvothe who is a magic-using person who also is a magician. While there's some intentional similarities, they are by no means the "same" person and the Virtuosos of the Void as a concept has nothing to do with the books. However, because of the similarities, they did a cross-promotion with Rothfuss' charity Worldbuilders to make a promo character card with Kvothe in place of Anthony Drake. You don't need to know anything about the books to understand the Argent Adept.
    • Given that the Legacy line has been around for a long time (as has Haka, Bunker, or others) has a Virtuoso of the Void interacted with any other heroes? The Legacy line has been around for a shorter time than there was a gap between Virtuosos, so no previous Virtuoso interacted with a powered Parsons person. No previous Virtuoso was a character in the past of Sentinel Comics. None have met Haka (although the timelines could have allowed it since he's been around so long). Of the villains, probably only Akash'Bhuta and Biomancer interacted with them in the past.
    • Anthony Drake, the "Dark Dynamics" variant, and Kvothe are all gingers, but it's hard to believe that all Virtuosos were - is that a common trend with them? They're from all over the world. The Dark Dynamics variant is still Anthony Drake, none of the other Virtuosos have any reason to look like him.
    • Could there be a Virtuoso who's tone deaf? What if AA lost his musical abilities? "Tone deaf" is tough, it's theoretically possible for somebody to be naturally talented in music but still be tone deaf, but it's probably fair to say that every Virtuoso so far has had perfect pitch. It's unclear how AA could lose his musical abilities (if somebody magically did something to his mind it's likely that the Void would somehow fix it). During that period, however, he'd retain the knowledge even if he'd be temporarily unable to use it. Even if he was deafened, he'd still be able to use his abilities (look at Beethoven as an example) and probably even use the Void somehow to get around that problem (like Mr. Fixer getting around being blind).
    • How long was the Multiverse without a Virtuoso? How many instruments have been destroyed? It's been a few hundred years (and it's not just a destruction of an instrument that caused the gap in Virtuosos). Many have been destroyed. Probably more than are still extant given that up until the gap there was at least one created per generation going back into prehistory.
    • "Dark Dynamics" Adept has a dal segno symbol on his chest - is there significance to this (re: its use in music notation to mark where to repeat a portion of the music)? He's also clutching a rose so hard his hand bleeds - is this tied to blood magic? It's not a rose, it's the Crimson Conductor's baton and, yes, it's tied to blood magic. The symbol is the insignia that the Crimson Conductor used, although it's interesting that he's also kind of repeating the sorts of things that the Crimson Conductor did.
    • The Instruments are obviously important, old, and powerful, but why aren't they "Relics"? Why was Xu's bell specifically that was used to destroy one of Voss's ships? They aren't "Relics" in the game-keyword sense because they aren't imbued with power in such a way as to pass that power on to somebody - they work that way for Virtuosos specifically, and wouldn't mean anything to anybody else. Relics also have a degree of "invulnerability" that the instruments don't really have. The bell just happened to be the one he picked, no larger significance. It's a very good thing that he didn't destroy his pipes that way - destroying the bell disrupted the connection between the bell and the Void-form of Xu, leaving it as a husk of what it once was. If he'd destroyed the pipes it would have killed him.
    • How is AA able to keep all of the instruments with him and ready to use? He keeps them in the Void and summons them when he needs them.
    • Are there Virtuoso instruments that the comics writers created that we just don't see in the game? Are there some that remain hidden even after the end of the Multiverse and does that affect his abilities? There are some that haven't been recovered, some have been destroyed, the end of the Multiverse has no effect on his abilities. There are some the writers made that we haven't seen yet - they'll mention some in the Future section.
    • Compared to the Scholar, he doesn't seem like a mentor person (big agreement there) - but he's worked with Nightmist, helped exorcise Dark Visionary, and helped the Naturalist get a hang of his powers; are there other heroes he's helped? What did he do with Tachyon and Mr. Fixer in "Alacritous Subdominant" and "Inspiring Supertonic"? The two major things he's done to help other heroes are the Naturalist and Dark Visionary events. He's speeding Tachyon up and making Fixer's punch do more damage - pretty straightforward augmentation stuff. He makes people better at the stuff they do.
    • Who's the kid on "Rhapsody of Vigor"? The first (very early, not very refined) version of Idealist.
    • Why does AA transform Naturalist into other animals instead of back to a human? From a functional standpoint, the story is supposed to sound like a fable. Story-wise, he realizes that he needs to do things this way to not kill Naturalist - he speeds the process along, but he can't just undo it.
    • Does AA wind up working alongside Akash'Thriya (and Naturalist)? Not really - the other two work together more, but the three of them do all go to the Nexus of the Void together. They're wary of each other, but when they do work together it works well.
    • How does AA feel about Naturalist awakening/helping to evolve Akash? Apprehension at first with a chance to grow into something more.
    • What's the giant egg on "Instrumental Conjuration"? It's the Nether Egg in the Realm of Discord. Laid by the Nether Fiend. We see Portal Fiends in the deck and they can open portals to move around within the RoD. The Nether Fiend is the most ancient of them (and much bigger/more powerful, so much so that it's ignored humans running around). The egg is going to hatch a being capable of opening portals between the RoD and physical world (which is bad). He can't destroy it (and even if he did it would bring down the wrath of all of the Portal Fiends on humans), but he can make it so it never hatches. He has to summon all of his instruments to do this.
    • What happened to him in MMFFCC? How did the Prime Wardens find him again? He fell through the bizarre swirling thing there that was known to swallow people. This let the other Prime Wardens trace him to this pocket dimension to rescue not only him, but other people who had been lost there. All things considered this was a good things because 1. finding/helping more people and 2. if somebody's going to fall into a weird pocket dimension thing, AA is a good candidate for being able to handle it.
    • Has Anthony Drake ever put out an album? A mix tape? A YouTube channel? Not really - he likely put down some backup vocals that got used at some point prior to becoming a Virtuoso, but that's all likely in his past since he's rather more busy with other stuff now. He'd probably like to be able to do more stuff now that he's a better musician, but he's just too busy.
    • [Stuff about how, as somebody who likes playing D&D Bards, it's nice to see a Bard superhero and, even more, one that people actually like it when you play him in-game] What kind of music does he like? Do he and Absolute Zero or Writhe ever talk about music? Does he even have fun anymore? He likes Jazz a lot. He likes a lot of things, but by no means everything (not really a "modern pop" guy). He likes hearing stuff that he hasn't heard before - even if he ultimately decides that something isn't for him, he's still always open to hearing new music. He might not even be aware of AZ and Writhe's interest in music - their interest is likely very different from his. They like to do stuff like relax while listening to a record - processing and enjoying it - while he lives music. They're also not likely to seek out a conversation with him about it - it'd be intimidating to talk to him about it. It'd be like trying to talk to a world-class conductor about what they do or something - it's not really easy to talk about things at their level.
    • Does Anthony's first name have anything to do with a certain creator's brother who sings about people reading letters to us? Yes. Christopher's brother Anthony is a professional artist and so that was an obvious go-to option.
    • What is the significance to his more practical/simple costume in tactics? Yet another segue...

Sources


Argentium/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • All of Guise's nemeses seem fairly wacky except Argentium, how did this rather serious-seeming character wind up involved? Argentium is not really a Guise villain, but a writer noticed that they have similar powers (shape-changing) and it would be funny if they fought. Argentium was pulling a job at a power plant and Guise happened to be the one who stopped him. Argentium was always good as escaping when heroes had him on the ropes. Guise was just the first one to pull out a fire extinguisher and be all "Hey, it's like in Terminator. Get it?" and it actually worked, freezing him in place and allowing Argentium to be captured - thus the animosity.

To Other Works

  • Argentium's "liquid metal" appearance and the background art evoking a steel foundry brings to mind the finale of the film Terminator 2: Judgement Day.

Sources


Atum/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Aviva Natasha Aldred/References

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Confirmed

  • Aviva Natasha Aldred (the last heir to the family who ran Aldred Industries until the whole Omnitron incident) now runs an environmentalist non-profit and he approaches her - she's good at this whole business thing and he doesn't want to be stuck in an office so he can do his animal-in-nature routine. He sells his 40% share in Conteh Energy to her for $1 so he can wash his hands of it (and get the board members off his back - although he gives her the goods on them too).

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Balarian/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • Is Balarian an individual or a species (there's a few of them on an Argent Adept incap)? Both - this is a bizarre alien, extra-planar entity that has one identity spread out in multiple bodies, so there are a lot of them, but they are all Balarian. Kind of like a hive-mind without a central "core". The Prime Wardens only really interact with one or two Balarian at a time as they're mostly outside of our reality.

To Other Works

  • As a giant tentacled alien monster with a spherical "body" and one giant eye, Balarian has a passing resemblance to Robert E. Howard-created Marvel creature Shuma-Gorath. However, that loses out on the cheeky grin that Balarian has and there's no shortage of giant tentacled aliens in pulp magazines or comics.

Sources


Beacon/References

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Artwork

Confirmed

For more information, see Legacy

  • Young Legacy's death at the Hands of Baron Blade sparks the alternate timeline that causes Iron Legacy to show up in Shattered Timelines.
  • The fight against Iron Legacy, involving both Legacy and Young Legacy from an alternate timeline, altered their timeline, causing neither to be at the fight when Baron Blade set his trap; both survive into the future, with Young Legacy taking on the role of Beacon in the Tactics timeline.
  • Strictly speaking, she is only known as "Beacon" in the Tactics timeline.[1]
  • Like her father, she's an only child[2]

To Other Works

Sources


Becky Blast/References

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Nothing Here Yet

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Benchmark/References

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Biomancer/References

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Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Much like Scholar has references to Full Metal Alchemist so does Biomancer since he creates Homunculus. The Homunculi were the main antagonists in that series.

Sources


Blade Battalion/References

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Nothing Here Yet

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Blood Countess Bathory/References

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Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Blood Countess Bathory is likely a reference to the real life Elizabeth Báthory, a Hungarian Countess who lived from 1560 until 1614. She was arrested in 1610 for kidnapping and torture of young women (some estimates put the total at over 650 victims, although the "verified" count is closer to 80) and was subject to house arrest for the last 4 years of her life. She's entered into vampire folklore due to the unsubstantiated rumor that she bathed in the blood of virgins to maintain her youth.

Sources


Boris "The Bear" Sokolov/References

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Nothing Here Yet

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Borr the Unstable/References

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Nothing Here Yet

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Brianna Hawke/References

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Tachyon pulls some strings and gets the hotshot lawyer that the FF has on retainer, Brianna Hawke, to help Matriarch out (a change from Lillian's original trial when Tachyon wouldn't help because of the things The Matriarch had done). The end result is that Lillian is released for good behavior as long as she has proven, trustworthy people to vouch for/watch her.

Sources


Bugbear/References

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Nothing Here Yet

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  • The outfit and appearance of Bugbear resembles the villain Sabretooth from Marvel.
  • In addition to his appearance a lot of his cards allude to Bugbear sharing qualities with Sabretooth and Wolverine. He uses scents to track people and he can regenerate health regularly.

Sources


Bunker/References

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Artwork

  • The card "Flak Cannon" features Bunker confronting Fright Train.
  • "Heavy Plating" shows Bunker defending from an attack by Ambuscade.

Confirmed

  • GI Bunker: This is an early version of the Bunker suit that fought alongside America's Greatest Legacy during WWII.
  • Freedom Six Bunker: Engine of War: This is Fright Train taking up the Bunker role in the Iron Legacy version of the future. He does not appear to do this in the normal or "fixed" timelines.
    • Bunker suit features:
      • All versions have projectile weapons.
      • Generally able to be "reconfigured on the fly" to emphasize different functions (might be a step too far to say that they're "modular" though.)
      • Self-repair functions.
      • WWII version is more what we think of as a "suit of armor" that a person wears and could attach things to whereas the versions Tyler uses are much bigger and are more like vehicles that you climb into and are just in the "chest" cavity, Freedom Six Bunker has taken one of these huge suits and has hollowed it out so that he can wear it like a suit of armor since Fright Train is so big to begin with.
      • "Omni-Cannon" is a staple of the platform, routes all of the suit's power into the shot, although the modern iterations are more powerful and more reliable than, say, the WWII version (although this isn't really something that's a feature of the game).
    • Other wearers of the Bunker suits: Corporal Vernon Carter wore what's now referred to as the "first" Bunker suit, but it was not referred to as such at the time (just with a Project Ironclad designation), Tyler Vance was the first to be called "Bunker". Steven Graves is wearing some different version in the Iron Legacy timeline. Tyler Vance was one of the first targets to be "put down" by Legacy once his plan to take over is put into action. Graves had had noble goals at first and had just gone down the wrong path - in the Iron Legacy timeline he'd found a way back and had redeemed himself, so Tachyon recruited him when she was putting together the team.
    • Other versions of Bunker that we see are still Vance, just different suits. The one we see in Freedom Four Annual #1 is his first "superhero" story and is also the first such alternate suit we see him wear.

To Other Works

  • As an American soldier who fights crime inside a heavily-armed robotic suit, Bunker is a clear analogue of the Marvel character War Machine.
  • The various Bunker-suits pictured on "Decommissioned Hardware" are homages to the various armors of Marvel's Iron Man.
  • Bunker bears a strong resemblance to the Space Marines of the Warhammer 40,000 tabletop gaming franchise.
  • Bunker's "Indestructible" moniker is likely a reference to "The Invincible Iron Man."
  • The art on Bunker: Engine of War's incapacitated side may be a reference to the cover of Iron Man #128, the culmination of the Demon in a Bottle storyline where Tony Stark confronts his darker side in the mirror.
  • Sentinels Tactics mentions the original suit is the YS-1300t. This could be a reference to the Millennium Falcon, a famous YT-1300 transport in the Star Wars universe.
  • The flavor text of "Turret Mode" is unique among all the currently printed Sentinels cards in that it literally fills the entire word balloon.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

    • Questions * Notes from Letters Page 8::
      • Hobbies? Social life? Nope. His "hobby" would be the Bunker suit itself - think along the same lines as a guy who's always tinkering on his classic car in his off hours. In the card game timeline he's also still in the military and "on assignment" which precludes some social life stuff.
      • Where was the original suit developed (in-house military or by a contractor)? Any tech leak out for use by bad guys? The Ironclad Project dates back to the Civil War, continued development until it got to the level of person-scale armor (starting at around WWI). The original goal at WWII stage would have been to have lots of armored soldiers, but it wasn't economical. The modern Bunker suit was a qualified success, but requires an operator who's very tech savvy - could be the operator/engineer/mechanic and they couldn't get many people to fill that role. The suit was developed in-house by the Army, though. The Army could make more, but in the main card game timeline that doesn't happen. No instances of bad guys driving Bunker suits - Miss Information stole parts as sabotage, Omnitron's definitely taken some of the tech, Chokepoint's whole deal, etc., but those are all different from somebody getting into the suit and running amok with it.
      • How much do the soldiers wearing the suits know about Project Ironclad and what's the project's true purpose? The purpose is just what's been said already. The users don't really know much beyond the military history of the project, but there's not much that's classified beyond what they themselves are doing while using the suits. There's no secret nefarious goal here.
      • Different variants are different people, how are they different, why did you do it this way, any others like this? Much of this is already answered. Any other characters like this too? Legacy, kind of Unity or Omnitron. Ra and the Ennead kind of would work this way too, but doesn't play out within the card game timeline. Why did Adam and Christopher do this? They like making new characters as opposed to shuffling the hero names around as legacy characters.
      • How did the relationship with the Wraith get started? Started as just working together doing the hero thing, then the hanging out in the shop together like described earlier. They've been on actual "dates" too, though, although being out in public is a bit harder given their personalities. Dinner and a movie "at home" is better.
      • How many suits does Bunker have (and special underwater and space suits)? We see the underwater suit in the FFA #1. He essentially has "infinite suits" for story purposes due to his constant tinkering in the shop. The "suit museum" we see a few times (Bunker deck: "Decommissioned Hardware" and Freedom Tower "Vance's Maintenance Bay", foil Freedom Five Bunker's incap side) are mostly decommissioned designs. He's not making them from scratch himself, but having access to help from Tachyon and Unity gives him more flexibility when he's designing them. Other "active" suits include a stealth suit, a space suit (got up to one of Voss' ships at one point).
      • What's happening on the incapacitated art for regular and Freedom Six versions in the alternate art pack? Regular version alternate art isn't meant to represent any particular time event. Freedom Five shows the destruction of Freedom Tower during OblivAeon. Freedom Six shows Graves after Iron Legacy wrapped him up and put him on the tracks, he was then hit by the train (which derails the train, but doesn't kill him outright).
      • What's Bunker's favorite sandwich? He likes meatball subs. No food allowed in the suit, though.
      • Did Bunker form Termi-Nation? Why only Unity and AZ with him? Termi-Nation isn't a team, but a comic event dealing with the turn of the government against powered people. The shady stuff involving Fort Adamant. The major villain is Chokepoint (and Dr. Demakov) and those three heroes are major players in the event due to their reliance on technology and how that relates to Chokepoint.

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

CON/References

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Confirmed

  • Future AI that assists Chrono Ranger
  • Also known as Concordia in an alternate Universe

Sources


Caleb Greene/References

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Confirmed

  • Doctor Medico's partner.
  • Psychologist

Sources


Calypso/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • Is Calypso an actual sea nymph, somebody with a Relic like Ra and the Ennead, or just somebody with water powers who named herself after the mythological character? Any other Greek beings like this? She's the latter (just a person with powers), there aren't any other pantheons besides the Egyptian one represented in Sentinel Comics.

To Other Works

  • Calypso is named after a sea nymph from Greek mythology. Fittingly, her powers seem to allow her to transform into water. Even more fittingly, she is an enemy of Ra, a hero who uses fire as his primary weapon.

Sources


Captain Cosmic/References

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Artwork

  • Captain Cosmic was seen as far back as Argent Adept's deck. He is shown on a picture portraying (as the Flavor Text may indicate) the Prime Wardens, though his name only became known during Vengeance as one of the Vengeance Nemesis cards; Empyreon listed his name.
  • The Radioactivist is bound up by the "Sustained Influence" of Captain Cosmic.
  • "Destructive Response" demonstrates the deadly power of constructs as several Celestial Executioners from The Celestial Tribunal are impaled.
  • "Autonomous Blade" allows Captain Cosmic to go on the offensive versus Infinitor.
  • Galactra takes the brunt of a "Harsh Offense".
  • Rahazar is unprepared as Parse dives for cover behind a "Wounding Buffer".
  • Haka demolishes The Hippo with the help of an "Augmented Ally".
  • Empyreon finds out monologues can lead to a "Potent Disruption".
  • Citizen Assault and Citizen Sweat are on the delivery end of "Construct Cataclysm".
  • Setback is able to heal from the energy blasts of Revenant because of a "Vitality Conduit".
  • His Domino Mask is originally red to match his outfit and shown that way in deck. However, in the alternate artwork for the Hero character cards and the portraits in the video game it is black.

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Hugh Lowsley became Captain Cosmic after he was exposed to mysterious radiation emanating from a meteorite. This is a classic comic book/sci-fi trope that has been used so many times it borders on cliché.
  • As a domino mask-clad superhero with the power to fly through space and generate energy constructs, Captain Cosmic draws easy comparisons to the DC hero Green Lantern, specifically the Hal Jordan incarnation.
  • The energy which fuels Captain Cosmic's powers is yellow, while the energy of his archenemy, Infinitor, is green. This is a color scheme reversal of the heroic Green Lantern and his evil enemy Sinestro, the latter of whom wields the yellow light of fear.
  • The art of "Construct Cataclysm" portrays Captain Cosmic throwing a construct the size and shape of a double-decker bus at two villains. This is a reference to the first issue of the 2011 "New 52" //Justice League// reboot, which featured Green Lantern throwing a fire truck-construct at a parademon.

Sources


Catastrophe and Verge/References

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Nothing Here Yet

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Chairman/References

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Artwork

  • Forum goer arenson9 and his spouse are the basis for The Deputy and The Broker.
  • "Undivided Attention" depicts the death of Mister Fixer at the hands of the Operative (Letters Page 10).

Confirmed

  • The Chairman is secretly Graham Pike, the mysterious CEO of Pike Industrial Complex
  • The Chairman is very much the conceptual opposite of Baron Blade. Where Blade is a flamboyant super-genius that uses grandiose sci-fi tech to achieve his goals, the Chairman is a subtle planner who strikes from the shadows through real-world means. The dichotomy of the two characters is further revealed in the flavor text of "Hired Gun."
  • The shadow on the back of his character card is 'Someone Unobtrusive' Christopher on the Forums
  • The Chairman deck is supposed to symbolize the endless slough against fighting Organized Crime as no matter how much you take out Thugs new ones keep coming back Letter Page Episode 2

To Other Works

  • As a corrupt businessman and master of the underworld, the Chairman is very similar to the Marvel character Wilson Fisk, aka the Kingpin. As an immortal who rejuvinates himself in a mysterious liquid, he is also similar to the Batman villain Ras Al'Ghul.
  • The scene pictured on the Operative's "Active" side is evocative of the climax of the film Scarface. Her "Incapacitated" side is styled after the art of Frank Miller.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes on Letters Page Episode 11:
      • Does he have any hobbies? His hobbies are crime and industry. He likes running the company. If he was just the Chairman of the Organization, he'd probably be bored while waiting for his underlings to report back.
      • Where is Pike Industries going to dump their chemicals once the sewers aren't an option? Rook City's pretty old and has a pretty old sewer system and he's put a bunch of resources into digging into the old parts. It's also a pretty good system and he's not exactly likely to "fill it up" or anything. They've also just trucked tanks of stuff out of town when necessary.
      • Was Plague Rat a deliberate creation? What was the purpose of the experiments that created him? Nope. Not an important part of the Chairman's story (which is why he wasn't mentioned earlier). The experiments had a lot of parts, hair-growth serum, hair-loss serum (to cause baldness to create need for the growth serum). Lots of both pharmaceutical drugs, but also new designer illicit drugs (mega-heroin, uber-meth).
      • What other abominations has Pike created? Mutant rats, giant mutant cockroach, Spite, Miss Information (in her later appearance), Rook City itself.
      • What is the relationship between Pike Industries and Revo-Corp? Revo-Corp has a presence in Rook City and they've had above-board business dealings. It's not like the Chairman and Baron Blade are interacting with each other using the companies as proxies.
      • Which other heroes and villains have worked for the Organization (we already know about Expatriette, Heartbreaker, and Ambuscade)? The Hippo has, Spite kind of later, Equity was mentioned in the last episode but he does more for them than just that one job, Professor Pollution gets a lot of chemicals from Pike, Radioactivist. A lot of the Chairman's methods are to pay off somebody to cause trouble as a move in later to "fix" things under the guise of Pike Industries.
      • What was the Organization during Vengeance or OblivAeon? Just doing business as usual during Vengeance - the Operative was kind of involved in a minor way in the aftermath. Sending people after Mister Fixer was more just clearing up loose ends than really being part of the overall Vengeance plot. The organization was more or less not involved in anything important during OblivAeon as the Chairman had disappeared at the time. More later.
      • Does the Chairman ever get involved outside of the Rook City or Pike Industrial environments in the "main" timeline (citing a line from the Video Game trailer about him never leaving Pike Tower)? The trailer's dialog was talking about Graham Pike who is, for all anybody knows, this really old man that nobody's seen for decades who, if he's even still alive, is probably hooked up to all sorts of life-support machines up there and can't leave. He was involved in the push to get the Organization into Megalopolis, but he also made another trip to the Temple of Zhu Long after the Operative incident, so there's a canonical fight there - they're not exactly enemies or allies.
      • If heroes of other villains enter Rook City, is he keeping tabs on them? Yes. General orders are to keep out of heroes' way. For villains, he's ready to take advantage of the aftermath of any fights but he's not interested in "team-ups".
      • Has the Organization gone after Dr. Tremata and Tony Taurus? Tremata is a forensic scientist, Taurus is a private detective (and eventually becomes the villain Heartbreaker). Heartbreaker also being the person responsible for killing Dr. Tremata (on trial in the Celestial Tribunal environment), so the Organization converted one and eliminated the other through that.
      • With all of the supernatural stuff going on, does he have any connection to that? He's aware of everything going on in town, but he's not actively involved in any supernatural stuff. He'd like to have that power, but he doesn't have it (and even more after Zhu Long just waltzes into his office).
      • What's his stance on existential threats (like Voss or Omnitron threatening to kill everybody rather than the profit motive that Pike himself has), just count on heroes to save the day? Most of the time he has to just look the other way. He doesn't really care if Rook City gets blown up as he can generally profit from rebuilding. One exception...
      • Anybody he's scared of besides Mister Fixer? What team takes him down? He's not scared of Mister Fixer and there isn't a hero team that "takes him down". When you play against his deck, you don't really feel like you've won as you've just fought through a portion of his crime empire. Sure he came out to personally fight for a while, but he just makes his escape eventually. He is, however, significantly concerned by Progeny. When he sees that happening, he legs it down to his secret bunker well under the lowest sewer levels after shutting everything down. Dark Watch (plus Harpy now), breaks into Pike Industries during that escape, but they're kind of too busy with Progeny at the time and he manages to seal himself away. Other than people who die, he's the only major player completely absent from the Multiverse events surrounding OblivAeon.

Sources


Champion Studios/References

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Nothing Here Yet

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Chaos Witch/References

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Nothing Here Yet

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Char/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

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Chokepoint/References

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Artwork

  • "Stripped Resources" shows her first appearance as "Chokepoint" - breaking through a wall of the Omnitron-IV ruins just following the "birth" of Omnitron-U (Letters Page 9)

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Chokepoint’s superpower of communicating with/coercing metal is similar to the powers of Mitchell Hundred (aka “The Great Machine”), the protagonist of the 2004 comic series Ex Machina by Brian K. Vaughn. Hundred can communicate with/manipulate machinery much like Chokepoint can. Additionally, Chokepoint’s ideologies call to mind those of the Great Machine's nemesis Jack Pherson, an eco-terrorist who could communicate with animals.
  • As a villain who gained her powers (or, in this case, an increase in power) from a device created by a different, extraterrestrial villain, Chokepoint draws comparisons to Black Hand, an enemy of the DC comics superhero Green Lantern. Black Hand wields an energy-siphoning device, one which he acquired from the alien Atrocitus after the latter dropped it in battle. Chokepoint increased her powers with the world-destroying energy crystal that was used and subsequently lost by Deadline.
  • With her pink and white hair, Chokepoint bears a strong physical resemblance to the Marvel villain-turned-heroine Songbird, although her powers of controlling metal are more evocative of X-Men nemesis Magneto.
  • The circuit-covered material engulfing Chokepoint's body on “Newfound Power” bears a resemblance to the connection suit often worn by Marvel’s Iron Man.
  • Chokepoint’s “Armored Animus” form, which is composed of equipment from multiple heroes, is evocative of the Marvel character Rogue. Rogue is a mutant with the ability to absorb traits from others, including superpowers, via skin-to-skin contact. There have been many instances where she has absorbed powers from many different superheroes, altering her appearance into a collective mish-mash of their physical traits.
  • "Harvest the Mighty" is visually similar to the climax of Marvel's "Age of Apocalypse" story line where Magneto rips Apocalypse in half. Luckily, Tyler himself is spared in this case.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page 20 - Choke/Chokepoint:
    • What's the extent of her ability to make "inventions" out of metal? Could she turn a pile of metal into a tank or would she have to use tank parts to do so? Could she make a computer or gun (which have non-metal components)? She doesn't really make devices/functioning equipment as much as glom together existing equipment. She kind of has the opposite power of Unity (she destroys stuff, Unity makes stuff). For an example, see the drill-thing she has on "Kinetic Looter" - that doesn't have working parts inside of it to turn the drill, she's just smashed together materials to get the right shape and can just make it rotate around her hand with her mind. She is not good at making things.
    • Her bio mentions a "star at the middle of the galaxy"; is this referring to OblivAeon or something else? That's a star that she thinks she can chain-react to take out a bunch of other stuff (this is the whole "eliminating weaknesses" motive at work).
    • She got additional powers from something that belonged to Deadline - is that item represented in his deck? When she's defeated, does she still have that item? Does Lifeline interact with her during the Multiverse era, how does he react to her using his gear? The Zenith Gauge, mentioned earlier, isn't represented by a card in his deck, but is visible in a lot of his art as he always has it (and gear that a character always has is not likely to be represented by a card because that means it could be taken away/destroyed/etc. - for example, Parse doesn't have a card to represent her bow; it's just assumed that she has it). She keeps it after she's defeated because it's now part of her. Lifeline doesn't encounter Chokepoint in the canonical timeline.
    • In previous episodes we know she winds up at Omnitron IV eventually, but given how she takes over metal, how was that not the end of Omnitron? More in the Termi-Nation section - while she does assimilate some of the tech there, she doesn't get it all as she has other stuff going on at the time (and it would take a long time to take it all - it's also harder for her to control things that have their own mind, see the problems she had with the Celestial Tribunal).
    • She has a halo around her head once she becomes Chokepoint - is this a reflection of how she sees herself or somehow related to OblivAeon (as his messenger?)? Also, how does she hear voices from metal? The shard of crystal (from the Zenith Gauge) isn't an OblivAeon Shard - it's technology that Deadline stole from the Enclave of the Endlings and the "halo" is another component of the same thing. She does kind of see herself as a savior type figure, but she's not actively going out of her way to look like an angel, nor is she in any way related to the OblivAeon events (one of the few characters not even touched by it since she's off in space at the time). She hears the voices of metal, but it's more just the way she is aware of her power's potential - it's not that the metal is calling out to be freed, it's that she can sense the metal nearby with an understanding that she could free it (i.e. turn it back into its base components), and this manifests to her senses as "hearing" it - as a call to action, to use her power.
    • Regarding Termi-Nation (implying that it's the trio of Bunker, AZ, and Unity pursuing Chokepoint), we don't have a lot of info - can you give us detail on their exploits? Why had Bunker and AZ invested in new suits? Turning this into the general Termi-Nation explanation:
      • After the Progeny event, which is one of the final big events prior to OblivAeon, the Southwest Sentinels are hanging out in Fort Adamant where they've been monitoring some weird spacetime events using the equipment there and have been forwarding that info off to the Freedom Five. While that's happening, the wall of their bunker explodes and Chokepoint floats in to wreck their day. This is the first appearance of Chokepoint and is the reveal that Choke didn't really die - the intervening events (coma, Zenith Gauge, etc.) is told in flashback after the Sentinels are defeated (which didn't take long).
      • Meanwhile, the Freedom Five are doing stuff - some are studying an OblivAeon shard. Unity has just wrapped up the Omnitron-U thing at Omnitron IV and Chokepoint shows up here as well, although Unity and Omnitron both just leave rather than try to take her on themselves. There was an editorial push to get everybody on the same page for the big thing they were going to be doing that involved Chokepoint.
      • Bunker and AZ are back at Freedom Tower monitoring the transmissions from Fort Adamant, but things have gone silent. Unity arrives at around this time and talks about Chokepoint showing up (although she leaves Omnitron behind). The three of them go to Fort Adamant, where Chokepoint is and the fight does not go well for these three most metal-dependent heroes. This is when "Harvest the Mighty" happens and we see the Bunker suit ripped in half. They escape and make it back to headquarters to regroup. The others are busy, so it's up to them to figure something out. Bunker and Unity work on building a Bunker suit made largely of ceramics. Absolute Zero extrapolates the techniques he'd been using to patch holes in his suit with ice to basically make a suit out of it (although still using the modules necessary to regulate temperatures normally).
      • Thus reequipped, they head back to Fort Adamant, but now it's seemingly abandoned. There are a bunch of big holes in the walls/buildings, but some of these lead into large underground facilities that were unknown to the heroes to this point (where some nefarious experiments had been going on). They head in, wind up separated for various reasons, and have to deal with automated systems but also with test subjects who have gotten loose - powered people who have been experimented on and augmented by the Ironclad Project (under the auspices of Dr. Demikahv). Bunker fights the Radioactivist who's more radioactive than before - now he has a large canister-like thing on his back that's storing the excess energy he's putting out that he can use for bigger blasts. Unity fights Char. Absolute Zero fights Highbrow - she's creepy; she has a giant brain and she has to stay in a special chair because of it (well, she had to stay in the chair until her brain was removed and put in a jar that hovers around her with a cable leading to her spine). She doesn't have any psychic powers or anything, she's just really really smart.
      • The Southwest Sentinels, back on their feet by this time, are fleeing from Chokepoint elsewhere in the underground base and stumble into a room with more OblivAeon shards. They grab the shards and promptly vanish (more on this in their episode). Chokepoint, at a loss for what happened to them, goes off to find other targets.
      • General Armstrong, the main military contact for the Freedom Five this whole time, is in some records room. He's been aware of a bunch of the stuff that's been going on, but isn't involved in anything sinister personally. He sees that somebody's trying to access the Bunker files and deletes it rather than letting it get out to whoever it is. The heroes hear him yelling his defiance to somebody regarding them, and then a gunshot, but they don't know what actually happens to him.
      • The heroes eventually confront Chokepoint and the resulting fight winds up disabling most of the base. Chokepoint loses and winds up in the holding cell mentioned earlier. The overall point of the story has been to establish that the government has been up to some shady things and paves the way for the Tactics timeline (where the heroes have separated from the government) and the RPG timeline (where they're still working cooperatively, but have distanced themselves a bit).
    • Bunker and AZ have their new approach to their equipment, but how does Unity adjust to fight Chokepoint? She doesn't maintain the bots as long. She'll make one, have it do a thing, then let it go as she can't count on them doing much without Chokepoint wrecking them anyway.
    • What does Chokepoint think about Unity (power similarities, hair-color copycat, etc.)? Unity doesn't like that Chokepoint hurts her friends, but likes her hair (although would never admit it). Chokepoint thinks Unity is an annoying child and is angered that she's putting metal into a form that's not its natural state.
    • What's the nature of the alien crystal that she absorbs? Is it sentient? Its nature is already covered, it's not autonomous/there's no will behind its operation.
    • How much is Chokepoint in control of herself or does the crystal manipulate her? She's already kind of unhinged and isn't so much being manipulated as she's now just aware of the worst possible targets for her to go after.
    • Seeing as we've found out a lot about characters' hair in these things, what's the deal with Evelyn's hair? Is she using metal to give it a particular look, are the pink tips related to her aura when she uses her power? Her hair is naturally black and she just dyes it this way, possibly as a backlash against the military upbringing she had.
    • In "Shocking Animation" we see Chokepoint doing something to Nightmist's amulet, what effect does this have on the relic (or could have on other relics)? Any relics made of metal could be interacted with. Fanatic's sword could be broken down (which would do little other than make Fanatic really mad), but others have wills of their own - the amulet is one such and caused a backlash, but doesn't grant any extra abilities to her.
    • Where did "Choke" and "Chokepoint" as names come from? A choke is a part of an engine that regulates air intake, and therefore the operation of that engine, and her name was chosen because of that connection. "Chokepoint" was a variation on the existing name, plus the Zenith Gauge letting her narrow her focus to points of weakness.

Sources


Chrono-Ranger/References

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Artwork

  • Plague Rat, Akash'Bhuta, Ambuscade, Citizen Truth, and Crackjaw Crew are portrayed on the bounty cards "The Ultimate Target," "By Any Means," "Kill on Sight," "No Executions," and "The Whole Gang"[1] respectively.
  • The Illusory Demon, one of the Dreamer's projections, is featured on the card "Sudden Contract".
  • Doc Tusser is featured on the cards "Eye on the Prize," "Terrible Tech-Strike," and "Dead or Alive".
  • Chrono-Ranger is holding Akash'Bhuta at gunpoint on "Just Doin' My Job".
  • Gloomweaver appears on the card "Displaced Armory".
  • Chrono-Ranger's original incapacitated art is the period when he is lost in time and space following his encounter with Ambuscade in Wagner Mars Base when he failed to kill the villain as his bounty specified. He was eventually saved from his situation by La Comodora. His alternate-art incap shows him beginning to turn into a Rat Beast following his battle with Plague Rat before Dark Watch finished the job and he was able to return to CON to be cured.[2]. The Best of Times promo's original incapacitated art depicts Jim taking the direct hit by OblivAeon during the destruction of Rook City and his alternate-art incapacitated art shows him in Pompeii as Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD - the young La Capitan stranded him there at the conclusion of their conflict.

Confirmed

Unconfirmed

  • The rat creature that bit Chrono-Ranger's arm off is likely a descendant of Plague Rat (or perhaps even the original), explaining why they are nemeses.
  • Chrono-Ranger is briefly alluded to, although not mentioned by name, in the backstory for The Eternal Haka.

To Other Works

  • Chrono-Ranger is a clear analogue for the "Weird West" tales that were popular in the late fifties and early sixties. The genre often took wild west characters and settings and introduced super-science, time travel, and magic into the mix. One of the most famous characters to emerge from this genre was DC's Jonah Hex, a deformed outlaw who made more than a few trips into the future. Most of the Chrono-Ranger's character traits seem to be based on Hex.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • From Letters Page Episode 25 Chrono-Ranger
    • When did the heroes first encounter Chrono-Ranger, who met him, and how did that encounter go down? The first encounter is in the Akash'Bhuta fight, but they don't meet him at that time. They first meet him in the Plague Rat fight when the members of Dark Watch talk to him.
    • Did Chrono-Ranger meet Haka in the Final Wasteland before going back in time? Does he stay in the main timeline? Chrono Ranger and the Eternal Haka never meet (CON and Haka don't know about one another). He goes to a lot of different timelines and is constantly saving/altering those timelines by his presence. The times we see him in the main timeline are mainly the ones that were mentioned earlier.
    • Can CON enable time travel within the same timeline (referencing the fact that in earlier episodes the guys generally talk about time-travel as specifically reality-hopping rather than actual time travel within a timeline)? Yes. CON's main limitation was that it couldn't travel through time itself and needed an agent (up until it figured out how to upload itself to CR's gear at the end of the multiverse era).
    • As James Brooks originated in Western comics, how did readers react to the sudden change to the time-travel stuff? They didn't. The Western comics were really old and weren't in continuous publication up until Chrono-Ranger started showing up. Certainly, really observant comics historians or similar could have realized that the publishers were reusing this old character, but it's not like he was rounding up the Hayes boys one month and then dealing with time travel the next in terms of comics publication. This is similar to Faye Diamond's introduction in really old comics before being introduced as Nightmist decades later.
    • What's the coolest thing he's seen in his time traveling exploits? That's pretty subjective, but maybe watching the destruction of Pompeii.
    • Was CR able to prevent the future of the Final Wasteland? He doesn't know, but yes.
    • Questioner has a pet hypothesis that Jim kills the original Plague Rat, but then gets infected and becomes one himself - is that what happens? Nope. He (and several other heroes) get infected, but don't ultimately become rat beasts. More on this next week in the PR episode.
    • In the Prime Wardens Argent Adept's bio, it says that they would have lost the fight against Akash'Bhuta if they hadn't been helped by Chrono-Ranger, what did he do to swing the fight their way? Did he have some kind of special tech for this purpose? He just uses his normal revolver. He shows up at precisely the right moment to distract/stun her enough for the heroes to make a comeback and win.
    • What's the storyline behind Temporal Targets? That's the book that a lot of his cards' flavor text cites. Publication-wise, this was something the company started putting out to explain all of the events that Jim had been popping in and out of. By the time it was published, it was covering events that often had taken place years prior (like the Akash'Bhuta fight), just now from CR's perspective. We also get his origin story here.
    • Is there a story behind his connection to his hat or is it just a trope? This is a holdover from his original Western comics as a running character trait that "you don't touch the Sheriff's hat" and the modern writers kept it going.
    • What is the Masada? It's a ray-gun that CON put together for Jim to use in a situation when he just couldn't do any damage to something with his normal weapons. This is demonstrative of the sort of "CON supplies Chrono-Ranger with the equipment he needs" plot detail (represented in-game by stuff like "Displaced Armory").
    • Who are the people on "The Whole Gang" and how do they factor into his story? That's the Crackjaw Crew, as mentioned. More on them in the upcoming Interlude on Nemeses later this month.
    • What's with the phrase "Thunder and mud!"? It's something he would say that was retained from the old Western comics - it's sort of like Unity's "Sparks!" exclamation.
    • Jim seems to be a fan of the "solve a problem, then ride off into the sunset" trope (or in his case "solve a problem, walk through a time-portal") and he seems like he doesn't socialize with the other heroes - is there a reason for this or is he just not into small talk? Does he have any friends? Since the completion of bounties is what allows him to jump back to CON, he tends to not stick around much. He's not really much one for small talk anyway and is ok with solitude, but the nature of his story doesn't really allow him to get to know any other heroes (until the Future section).
    • Did Jim have any kids before he got dropped through time (and does he have any descendants running around)? Not that he knows about. He had a sweetheart back in Oklahoma, but she didn't go with him when he went out west. She found out after he left that she was pregnant and her telegram never reached him.
    • During his time-travels, has he ever met himself (or alternate-universe versions of himself)? No. He and La Capitan/Comodora are the only "true" time-travelers out there and he never gets sent to the same place twice and so doesn't interact with himself.
    • Does he return to CON after each mission? Yes, by the nature of how the time travel works (up until the Ambuscade incident at least).
    • How's his relationship with CON? They get along. He finds the chatty robot a bit annoying, but appreciates the effectiveness of it.
    • In the CR books, did the writers ever use time-travel as an excuse to have him meet past versions of heroes (previous Legacies, Black Fist, etc.)? Absolutely - in his solo series they did this a lot.
    • Now that he's met La Comodora, does anything happen between them (common time-travel experiences)? No - they become friends/drinking buddies given the common experiences, but they don't have a romantic relationship.
    • How are Plague Rat and Jim nemeses? Jim justifiably has a chip on his shoulder regarding man-sized rat creatures given that one ripped his arm off, but is PR long-lived enough to have been that rat creature or is it a descendant? Is he trying to stop Plague Rat to stop all rat beasts in the future? It's mostly the last bit - CON knows that Plague Rat and the infection that comes with it is part of what leads to the Final Wasteland and so needs to be stopped, but for CR this is kind of personal and that is what justifies the Nemesis status. Plague Rat doesn't know about any of this, but they've said before that being a Nemesis has to be a symmetrical motivation.
    • Why do we almost never see his mechanical arm? His original mechanical arm is rather spindly, but is rather compact when he's not using it - we generally see it while he's extending it, consciously. While in its compact state it's easily hidden at his side by his poncho.
    • Who/What is CON and where did it come from? The Concordant Harmonic Entity was created near the "end of the world" scenario that resulted in the Final Wasteland by some heroes - Unity, Mr. Fixer, and the Argent Adept. They decided to build this entity for the purpose of having it be smart enough and last long enough to figure out time travel to try to prevent this bad future. The vast knowledge of the Virtuoso of the Void and the mechanical know-how of the other two were what allowed them to build the bunker and the AI that went with it, along with the ability to self-upgrade when necessary. CON's personality is mostly due to Unity's influence, but it's largely a combination of their minds. In the thousands of years it's existed, it's worked its way up to the 4th major iteration and is finally able to send things through time when CR finds it.

Sources


Citizen Dawn/References

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Artwork

  • Card art for Citizen Anvil is based on Christopher (Confirmed, Origins 2013, and before).
  • The card art for Citizen Hammer is based on Adam (Confirmed, Origins 2013).
  • Citizen Anvil is also Christopher's Paladin from his World of Warcraft days - shield, hammer, and bright wings are very close to the Paladin spell, Avenging Wrath (Confirmed, Origins 2013).
  • Citizen Hammer is Adam's Mage from World of Warcraft - quite a bit of Fire could be a Mage spell (Confirmed, Origins 2013).
  • Citizen Anvil and Citizen Hammer are sequential cells (their card arts line up).
  • Citizen Sweat, Citizen Blood, and Citizen Tears are sequential cells (their card arts line up).

Confirmed

  • Expatriette is the daughter of Citizen Dawn and Citizen Pain. Expatriette's facial injuries are the result of Dawn's attempt to jump-start power manifestation in her daughter by blasting her in the face. Pain fought her over this action, which resulted in his death (Letters Page Episode 4).

To Other Works

  • Citizen Dawn could be considered inspired by Magneto and the Brotherhood of Mutants.
  • The Seasons can be derived from one set of Greek Horae (or the Hours) named after the four seasons Eiar (Spring), Theros (Summer), Phthinoporon (Autumn), and Cheimon (Winter) - daughters of Helios (god of the sun) and handmaidens of Hera. Depictions of the personifications of the seasons as young women is a common motif in art.
  • The flavor text on Citizen Blood's card is a reference to "The Message", the 12th episode of the show Firefly.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page Episode 5
      • How does Dawn feel towards Expat as the latter's story goes on? Prior to Expat's escape: Embarrassed by her "normal" daughter. She doesn't have a motherly bone in her body. Saw her not so much as a daughter as an expectation of great potential.
      • After escape/murder of Citizen Gate: Traitor. Dead to her. Good riddance.
      • Around the initial Freedom Five/Megalopolis scenario: Annoyed, outwardly indifferent. Represents her "only failure".
      • After the defeat at Insula Primalis: Resentment. Not only a failure, but now also humiliation. "Sure you beat us, but you cheated."
      • After OblivAeon: Tricky. No more love, probably more respect. Still full of contempt. Very few redeeming qualities for Dawn, but less hate hate.
      • How does she feel about the non-lethal ammo? doesn't care.
      • About the relationship with Setback? doesn't care (if she even knows about it).
      • Does she care if Expat has a child? Probably not, unless it had powers in which case yes. Would probably feel need to take the kid.
      • Dawn weaker at night (or on planet with a different sun or something)? She gets power from any light.
      • Adam's upside-down Citizens logo is due to a production error.
      • Her opinions on Baron Blade? No powers, but he fits the M.O. of "better than other people," including stuff involving the various serums, so what's up? They're not allies. She was skeptical of his ability to do anything as a villain because "no powers" and he's obviously gonna get stopped. After he gets powers she approached him to let him become a Citizen, but he's not playing second fiddle (the "discussion" between them at around 39:40 is pretty funny). She expressed interest in getting the reversed serum from him to allow her to create more Citizens, but he's not letting other people get powered minions. Later they go ask for an MDP, let them take an old decommissioned one.
      • Thoughts on Legacy? Traitor. Doesn't understand why he protects non-powered people.
      • Thoughts about Tachyon or other people who gained powers later? Any powered person is good to go. Plenty of Citizens gained power later in life. Technology to give you the power doesn't count, though.
      • Do she and Ra ever have a "Sun-off"? See "Drawn to the Flame" in Ra's deck. She's powered by the sun and other light sources; he's the god of the sun and the sun's "chief export is fire and that's what he's into". She's doing stuff with light and energy, he's doing stuff with fire and burning
      • Any heroes powerful enough to shut down Dawn, one-on-one every time? None. Some have a chance: Legacy, Fanatic, Haka, "characters who are good at taking a beating" can "go toe-to-toe" but would have trouble taking her down. By the end of the SotM story, Expatriette has the skills - training and experience fighting powered people and specifically her mom. K.N.Y.F.E. gets shut down hard. Guise can probably "survive indefinitely" but he's not going to do anything to her but annoy her.
      • Resources to build the Citadel? Just carves the base out of the mountain with her power. Later she has access to other Citizens with utility-based powers. Card game Citizens are the fighters, but don't represent the full group by any means.
      • Any actors to play Dawn? "Absolutely Robin Wright - specifically citing House of Cards (there's an episode where she's wearing a high-necked red outfit - I don't know what episode that would be).
    • Questions about Citizens:
      • Do Citizens get along? Outside of their themed groups? Any that don't get along? Truth and Dare are brothers who don't get along (Dare hates Truth). Assault and Battery are buds. Seasons get along ok. Overall, basically a nation more than family.
      • Does Dawn have any favorites? Hammer and Anvil are her number 1 guys (and can count on their blind loyalty), but she doesn't really care about any more than others. They are a bit unnerving to the other Citizens to the extent of their devotion. Anvil is always watching and judging, Hammer more likely to lash out at infractions. (All joking aside about how awesome they are, they're terrible people).
      • How are the names chosen? Some pick their own. Some Dawn assigns. Some non-themed just pick something (Gate didn't have a partner), not likely to have a group until high-ranking. Titles are changeable - if Summer died there could be a new Summer assigned.
      • Is it ok to feel bad about harming Citizen Spring? She's nice, but kind of got an abused thing going on regarding the other Seasons.
      • How many citizens are there? We getting a full laundry-list in the RPG? Around 100 adults, some more children.
      • Are Truth and Dare different people (one coming into play destroys the other). Why did Absolution break? Truth and Dare don't get along, that's why one leaves when the other enters play. Truth's shield, under certain circumstances is 100% unbreakable. It's manifested as part of his will and you have to shake him to break his shield.
      • How do Citizens feel about being raised from the dead? Any limit? Two ways this happens in "Return with the Dawn" (SotM vs. Tactics). First is "puppetry" - she's directly animating them. Actual raising from the dead is not something she can normally do, leaves her out of commission for a long time - doesn't even want to do it often. The Citizens do not like it - it's never a pleasant experience in Sentinels when people come back from the dead (although Spite is into unpleasant experiences).
    • Questions about Pain:
      • Who is Expat's father? As already mentioned in Episode 4, Citizen Pain, killed by Dawn. Not still alive. Not involved in any major game story arcs (as he's mostly in the backstory stuff).
      • Was there a Citizen Gain? What's their deal? Pain and Gain were minor villains (using different names) in one issue of some comic (part of the recruitment wave mentioned earlier). Pain's name is Richard Pensley (I'm guessing the spelling), Gain's is Linda Pensley (his wife). Pain's power could activate/deactivate nerve endings in a target at range. Gain is a power amplifier - can boost other powered people (passive by being nearby, but she could also focus it).
      • What's the history of Dawn and Pain's relationship? Dawn impressed by Pain's power. Makes a proposition under the logic that their child would obviously be super powerful. Pain was not into this and Gain is super not into it. Dawn basically says it's not a request - Pain will be the father or you both die, so he agrees. Dawn furious at the lack of power in their offspring and it's obviously not her fault, so she kills Pain. Gain tries to kill Dawn by "blowing out her power" by amplifying it too much, which apparently has worked on others before. Dawn is not impressed and just kills Gain. This super-charge doesn't ever really go away, though. This is what allowed her to do the "merged with the power of the sun" thing.
      • Why stop at one child? Inwardly afraid that the failure is her fault. Currently has a scapegoat in Pain.
      • Dawn do anything special for Valentines day? No! They don't celebrate "normal" holidays. Founding of the Citadel is Dawn's Day, though. Christopher should write a Citizens of the Sun Anthem.
      • What's Dawn up to during OblivAeon event? Expat goes in solo and unarmed to ask for help (see Episode 4). Dawn is at first ready to shun her, similar to her initial isolation on Insula Primalis. She sends Expat off, but Dawn does show up during fight with the Scions. Pulls out a helpful "Devastating Aurora" type thing, then disappears after the final battle.

Sources


Citizen Gate/References

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Confirmed

Sources


Citizens Assault and Battery/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Citizens Hack, Slash, and Burn/References

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Confirmed

  • Citizen slash is not Expatriette's father Adam, Gathering of Heroes 2014

To Other Works

  • Visually, Citizen Slash is similar to the Marvel character Wolverine.

Sources


Citizens Hammer and Anvil/References

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Confirmed

  • Anvil is based off Adam's Mage character from World of Warcraft, and is drawn to look like him, while Hammer is based off Christopher's Paladin (including the 'Wings of Light' and drawn to look like him)
  • Worked primarily with Biomancer and Sergeant Steel on their various plots going against Dark Watch Letters Page Episode 4
  • This duo is the best and you can read that in the show notes here Letters Page Episode 5

Sources


Citizens Pain and Gain/References

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Confirmed

  • Citizen Pain is not a character currently in any of the Sentinel Comics lines. He was mentioned and finally named in the Fourth Letters Page Podcast

Sources


Citizens Truth or Dare/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Citizens: The Seasons/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Crackjaw Crew/References

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Confirmed

  • Per the Nemeses Interlude of The Letters Page:
    • The Crackjaw Crew were a band who were given powers by Wager Master
    • Screech is the vocalist who has given sonic/yelling-based powers.
    • Deep Root is the bass player and is plant-based.
    • Blister is the guitarist who has fire powers.
    • Snare is the drummer, a paraplegic whom Wager Master also gave a hover chair, whose eye-beam is capable of grasping objects/people rather than being a "laser" or other damaging power.
    • Is Screech related to the Shrieker? Nope, they just both have yelling-related powers.

Sources


Cueball/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • Is Cueball a pool hustler that Guise interrupted a shot for? Where does one get a mask/helmet like that? He can see out - it's like a one-way mirror. It's also got a lot of heads-up-display stuff that lets him control stuff he's set up (he's a tech-based villain) which includes his suit, which includes the powers of every pool ball (what, you didn't know that each pool ball has a distinct power?). He can shift his suit to use each of them (it'll change color to match whichever one he's using at the time). The pool ball theme is one he came up with after developing this suit with different powers - he liked pool so why not?

To Other Works

  • As a villain with a sphere for a head, he resembles Spider-man foe Mysterio.
  • Conversely, as an antagonist specifically evoking a billiard/pool ball, he's similar to Doc Scratch from the webcomic Homestuck.

Sources


Cult Leader Massey/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Dana Bertrand/References

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Confirmed

  • Wife of Tachyon
    • The reorganization into the Freedom Four was in the mid '70s. A decade later, it was revealed that her roommate/college friend/supporting cast character, Dana Bertrand, was her girlfriend (a topical retcon, but still an actual "coming out" event as it was Tachyon revealing this to the team rather than it being an attempt to imply that it had "always been this way" - this was made a bit easier since the writers had never bothered putting her in any relationships before this point). In the late '90s they had a big wedding event issue (in grand comic book tradition). This was about 5 years before gay marriage was actually legal in any State in the US, but it was in the Sentinels Comics world. This was a controversial move at the time.

Sources


Dark Mind/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Dark Watch/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page Interlude 5 - Dark Watch:
    • Dark Watch (or at least members) seem to patrol Rook City whereas most other teams seem to deploy or travel to areas where they become aware that something is happening, how do they effectively travel around the city quickly given that they don't have super speed or flight? Expatriette has a motorcycle, Setback does the standard rooftop-leaping style of patrol (and doesn't fall off too often), Nightmist has portal magic (and is pretty good at doing the short-distance thing) and Harpy learns this too eventually, Mr. Fixer might have to lean on the magic-users a bit more heavily than the others.
    • Why/how did Expat become the leader and how does her leadership style differ from Legacy or Argent Adept? She formed the team (so that gives her some amount of primacy right there) but she's also the most decisive/most tactically goal-oriented, so it's kind of a natural fit. The team dynamic isn't really "leader-based" or coordinated as, say, the Freedom Five is and therefore aren't necessarily as synergistic in style as the others. No plan can really survive contact with Setback, after all.
    • When Expat and Setback fight Dark Mind and losing their memories/emotions, does Setback actually ever become a villain? Do the two of them fight? They definitely battle - "Setback without his empathy is a monster." He's so strong physically and has such an influence on the world around him, that him being heedless of what he's doing he's "a walking disaster". He's very dangerous just to be around and it's only his optimism and care for everybody that tempers this, normally. There's not a long period of time involved here, though. Faultless fixes the team in the same issue that Dark Mind messes them up.
    • Setback's insignia seems to be a reference to his luck-based powers, but if nobody knew about that until later what caused him to choose it? People didn't necessarily know how his power worked, but he was always aware that his own luck was terrible (that is, one can recognize that you have bad luck without coming to the conclusion that there's magic or some actual force behind it). Him choosing a die that's come up 1 as a way to own this aspect of his life.
    • Mr. Fixer's greatest strength has been noted as being his inner peace, but he doesn't seem to be much at peace with himself; does he ever eventually have an internal struggle to accept the various parts of his past (street kid, bombastic hero, teacher, pacifist, etc.)? Less of a "running from his past" thing and more of a realization of what his circumstances have made him - he changes over time, but don't we all? He is as his life has made him at all points in his life and he recognizes that. He's very good with the balance of past, present, and future.
    • Has Mr. Fixer taught any other heroes any of his cool moves? If so, who and what? If not, why not? We see him teach Guise. We know he taught a group of students, including the Operative. He gave up teaching because it didn't turn out well for his students. Once he's the hero Mr. Fixer it doesn't really take long before he's killed and while in his Dark Watch iteration he's not in the right frame of mind to be teaching anybody anything. It's only after Faultless fixes him that we see him teaching again (in both Tactics and RPG timelines - in the former he's mostly helping Setback get some control and in the latter he's got a dojo set up again).
    • Nightmist fought crime as part of Dark Watch - is this a change from her "magic investigations" role? Was this a comics-sales-based editorial change, story reasons, or just to fit in with the team? The word "crime" here is fairly loose given that sometimes the crime is magical in nature, it might be better to say that they fight "wrongdoing" however that manifests (although, granted that it's in Rook City there's plenty of mundane crime to deal with).
    • Now that Nightmist dissipated in the run-up to OblivAeon, is there really no way to bring her back? Could the Master and Harpy work together to do something for her? Since there are only 2 timelines after OblivAeon, shouldn't her essence be more concentrated? It sounds like she's not "dead" enough to have an afterlife, but not alive enough to, well, live; will she be like that forever? Is there still any kind of portal left connecting Tactics and RPG timelines? The portals were only able to open in the first place because OblivAeon had shattered the timelines - Nightmist was taking advantage of what OblivAeon had done to connect things and without him present she cannot open portals between realities like that anymore. The only portals remaining are in Tactics and only connect to the Block. The mists that remain are not her - in Tactics, they're just the residual magic energy she'd used to create the portals, in the RPG it's complicated: keeping in mind that she isn't anywhere to be found or to "get back", the mists are keeping her from a final rest (hints that there might be a plot involved to help her get to this rest).
    • Since the Matriarch only had one villainous outing (Freedom Five Annual #2), what are the other books mentioned in her deck flavor text (A Murder Most Fowl and Night's Plutonian Shore)? Those two books are ones that expand the story of what happened in FFA #2 - like was mentioned in the Freedom Five episode, the Annual books could be stand-alone or part of a larger arc. This one was mostly self-contained, but there were these other two things to flesh things out more. AMMF was a one-shot to go more into the setup/backstory of the Matriarch (like the vacation to Italy and whatnot) and NPS was a 3-part limited series that got into the side-events and some follow up after the event.
    • In the Lillian Corvus episode, is the prison break that happens while she's incarcerated the same one from the Chairman deck? It's not the only one - the Chairman organizes these things frequently, but it was one of them.

Sources


Desert Eagle/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Desert Eagle is a dead ringer for Spider-Man villain Vulture.

Sources


Doc Tusser/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • So, why did the troll Doc Tusser decide to become a cowpoke? He's not like a "fantasy" troll, he's just kind of troll-ish. He's as close to a "troll" as exist in the setting, though. There's this ancient offshoot of humanity that's kind of gross, but are long-lived and have great regenerative ability, but most of them do what they can to disguise themselves to hide from and/or blend into society. Doc Tusser is dressed up in his "cowpoke" outfit just as his attempt to blend into his time and place. His presence in Vengeance is a result of him being pulled forward in time. He called himself "Doc" Tusser because his explanation of why he could return healed of whatever injuries was because he used to be a doctor and could just treat himself in the interim.

Sources


Doctor Medico/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

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Dok'Thorath Capital/References

[http://sentinelswiki.com/index.php?title=Dok'Thorath_Capital

  • _"Gene-Bound_Ravagers"_shows_a_Gene-Bound_Firesworn_riding_on_the_shoulder_of_a_Gene-Bound_Guard,_both_from_the_Grand_Warlord_Voss_deck.
  • _"Abject_Refugees"_depicts_Captain_Cosmic_in_his_Prime_Wardens_costume./References&action=edit Edit this Reference]

Confirmed

  • The fighting on Dok'Thorath started because Voss' fleet was destroyed, some rebels seized the opportunity to try to take over. The Prime Wardens ended up in the midst of the fighting because they were in some way helping Sky Scraper. The fighting was occuring before the heroes showed and continued after they left. Gen Con 2016 Q&A

To Other Works

  • The card “Orbital Bombardment” shows the rebel base being destroyed by laser fired from space. This is a reference to Star Wars Episode 4: A New Hope, which had the evil Galactic Empire attempting to destroy the base of the heroic Rebel Alliance with their spacefaring superweapon, the Death Star. The composition of the art also calls to mind the alien attack in the film “Independence Day,” specifically the scene where the alien saucer destroys the White House.
  • “Dok’Thorath” may be an anagram for "Dothraki," the name given to the nomadic warrior people of the “Song of Ice and Fire” books by George R.R. Martin.
  • As an oppressed alien planet ruled by an unstable military, particularly one that has recently lost it’s de facto leader (Grand Warlord Voss), Dok’Thorath draws numerous comparisons to Korugar, the chaotic homeworld and ex-dominion of Sinestro.

Sources


Dr. Tremata/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Eaken-Rubendall Laboratories/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Eduardo López/References

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Confirmed

  • Contact of The Wraith's that she uses to solve crimes
  • Dates Sara Scott
  • Killed by Spite

Sources


Emily Parsons/References

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Artwork

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Empyreon/References

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Confirmed

  • Empyreon is the first peek we had at Captain Cosmic nemesis symbol.

To Other Works

  • Visually, Empyreon is similar to the Silver Samurai, an adversary of Wolverine.

Sources


Enclave of the Endlings/References

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Artwork

  • Black Fist, the character appearing with Legacy on "Hall of the Terminarch" is the original incarnation of the hero that later became Mr. Fixer. The scene shown was a rare appearance of both of them in the same story - it was much more common for Black Fist to be in his own stand-alone story in the back pages of Justice Comics (Letters Page 10).

Confirmed

  • In Episode 24 of the Letters Page, Christopher and Adam indicated that Jansa is pronounced "YAHN-sah".

To Other Works

  • The back art for the Enclave of Endings deck is textured with Ben-day dots. “Ben-day” was a type of color printing process that was used in the comics of the 1950’s and 1960’s. It made use of the overlapping of small colored dots that combined two or more of four basic colors, specifically cyan, magenta, black, and yellow. When combined, a variety of different colors and shades could be easily arranged to provide basic coloration for pictures. Ben-day coloration was serviceable but also very imprecise; colors would often wash out beyond their respective shapes, especially if they were small in size. It was supplanted by superior methods in the 1970s.
  • The exclamatory word balloon on the back art of the Enclave of Endings deck is a common comic book trope. Off-screen characters dynamically introduce a specific locale through such exclamations. Usually they will build up to the name of the locale with some basic exposition, trail off their sentence with “…”, and then continue with a preceding “…” onto the name on the next panel, which will typically show the locale in large scale. While not as popular in modern comics, the trope was used quite often in silver-age publications.
  • All the art of the Enclave of Endings deck is drawn to stylistically emulate legendary comic book artist Jack Kirby. The exaggerated, line-ridden shapes and circle designs interconnected by zig-zagging lines are all staples of Kirby’s work. The minimal variances in color emulate the comic art of the silver age, which was limited by printing constraints. Some of Kirby’s best known work hails from the silver age. To push the homage even further, Kirby was known for his love of drawing bizarre and fantastical monsters; all the aliens of The Enclave of Endings are some manner of monster.
  • The artwork of many Enclave of Endling card (most prominently Venox, the Last Mubbloxian) are covered in black dots which coalesce into various cloud-like shapes. These are known by comic fans and artists as "Kirby Dots", a famous visual signature of Jack Kirby’s artwork.
  • Phrentat, the Last Piunite, bears a strong resemblance to the Marvel villain M.O.D.O.K.
  • Immutus, the Last Fortian, is nearly identical to a Celestial, one of the god-like aliens who strongly influenced the ancient Marvel Universe.
  • As a world populated by the last individuals of various alien species, the Enclave of Endlings draws to mind the Marvel comics character The Collector. The Collector's obsession was collecting the last and rarest of everything, including living creatures.
  • Orbo, the Last Satellan, is a living creature shaped like a planet. As such, he draws comparisons to the antisocial sentient planet Mogo of DC fame, as well as the Marvel character Ego the Living Planet.
  • Urdid, The Last Nordid’s armor, weapon, and combative nature suggest a connection with Kaagra Warfang.

Sources


Equity/References

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Confirmed

  • Equity was an early Wraith villain who was an Assassin Letters Page Episode 2 - Wraith
  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • What's the deal with Equity? He's an assassin for hire. Nobody really knows where he came from, he's very enigmatic. If you have a grievance, he can be brought in to balance the scales. He's got a really rigid code, but not really a villainous outlook. He's just a normal guy named Andrew Jones living in suburban middle-America with a wife and three kids where he works as an insurance auditor (providing a handy reason to go on business trips all over). One power is to change form into the look he has in the card-game appearance. He can also destabilize things on a molecular level so that he can then pass through it (not like at a full run - I'm thinking more of the speed that the T-1000 walked through the bars in Terminator 2 only the environment is moving around him instead of the reverse). His other power is his "Unsettling Gaze" - if he has eye-contact with you, you cannot see him (you might look away and see him in the corner of your eye and look back, but won't be able to see him - then he slits your throat; he's very hard to fight).

To Other Works

  • Equity’s appearance is strongly evocative of the Batman villain Two-Face. While his nemesis symbol is for the Naturalist, his flavor text hints that the Wraith, the Sentinels Batman analog, has had run-ins with him before.

Sources


Ermine/References

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Artwork

Confirmed

To Other Works

  • As a nimble female cat-burglar who dresses with a feline theme, Ermine draws easy comparisons to Selina Kyle, aka Catwoman. The fact that she is a nemesis of the Wraith, a Batman proxy, furthers the resemblance.
  • The scene pictured on “Constant Prattle” is lifted directly from the Batman story “Mad Love.” "Mad Love" was written by Paul Dini and appeared in a Batman Adventures one-shot in February of 1994. The only differences between the "Constant Prattle" and "Mad Love" depictions are the pictured characters: Ermine takes the place of the Joker’s girlfriend Harley Quinn, and Wraith takes the place of Batman.
  • Tantrum is the first villain to be published with a Nemesis symbol for Skyscraper.
  • Calypso is named after a sea nymph from Greco-Roman mythology. Fittingly, she seems to have the ability to turn into living water. Even more fittingly, she is an enemy of Ra, a hero who uses fire as his primary weapon.
  • The Seer greatly resembles the Marvel hero Danny Rand, aka the Immortal Iron Fist.
  • Equity’s appearance is strongly evocative of the Batman villain Two-Face. While his nemesis symbol is for the Naturalist, his flavor text hints that the Wraith, the Sentinels' Batman analog, has had run-ins with him before

Sources


Expatriette/References

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Artwork

  • The card art of Pterodactyl Thief (from the Insula Primalis environment deck) shows a pterodactyl stealing Expatriette's RPG launcher. On her "RPG Launcher" card, Expatriette is seen riding the Pterodactyl to attack a T-Rex.
  • Expatriette features Citizen Dawn on the card "Liquid Nitrogen Rounds".
  • "Shock Rounds" are seen striking both Setback and Revenant.
  • Argentium is being blasted by "Hollow Points".
  • Citizen Slash takes several "Incendiary Rounds" in the back.

Confirmed

  • Expatriette's Father: The identity of Expatriette's father was unknown until Letters Page Episode 4 when he was revealed to be named Citizen Pain. However, very little about him is known in general. It has been stated that he was originally planned to be in Citizen Dawn's deck, but was "cut out in the first round of playtesting". In the story, Citizen Dawn killed Expatriette's father because he did not provide her with powerful offspring.[1] Prior to the revelation made in the Letters Page, he was confirmed to not be Citizen Slash, the Nemesis found in the Vengeance version of Baron Blade's deck, but his grave is featured on Citizen Dawn's "Return with the Dawn" card in Sentinels Tactics (although the tombstone is broken and the name partially obscured).
    • Expatriette's father's identity will be revealed and relevant to the story.[2]
  • On the back of Dark Watch: Setback's card, his incapacitated self involves a picture of him distraught while holding a dead or wounded Expatriette. This seems to imply that Setback and Expatriette have some sort of relationship, which was later confirmed.[3]
  • Glowing Doves - Both Pride and Prejudice have a Dove decorated on the side of them - and in cards like "Flak Jacket", "Hairtrigger Reflexes", "Assault Rifle", and "Quick Draw". What do these mean? Is it possible she has powers of some sort, given she has 2 very powerful super parents, and they just haven't manifested yet? Possible to manifest in a future Promo Version, or possibly related to the mysterious man on "Quick Draw"?... and Christopher just says "Strong Work People"...[4]
    • There is a story reason for the doves on Pride and Prejudice, the rest are just there for style/John Woo reference. They do not indicate a latent super power - her "most super power" is her purple hair. The mysterious man on "Quick Draw" was revealed to be Ambuscade.[5]

To Other Works

  • "Speed Loading" may be a reference to the climactic fight scene of the 2002 action film Equilibrium.
  • Many of her cards are, at least in part, a reference to a certain style of action movie, particularly those by filmmaker John Woo.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Letters Page Episode 4 Summary:
    • What's her day job? Well, for a while murder was her day job and she was good at it. As a hero she and Setback had a bunch of conflicts about her taking "side jobs" - but later in the SotM timeline she's more likely to either do a lot more vetting on these things or to do things like bounty hunting to track down escaped powered criminals.
    • Does she have the skill to aim to incapacitate or does she shoot to kill? Kind of depends on the era we're talking about, but she generally aims to kill, but later relies on non-lethal ammo to keep her honest when she's trying for non-murder.
    • What's the deal with the white doves on the cards? Already talked about the doves on Pride and Prejudice. They're an artistic motif, there for style. Explicit reference to John Woo and other movies. It's not a "power" or anything, there aren't always doves around when she's around. The birds "don't mean anything."
    • Where does she get her weapons and ammo? A lot of them she just buys, she can modify to some extent, but she's not an inventor or otherwise making her own stuff. Tachyon keeps her stocked in the specialty ammo.
    • Who taught her to shoot? No real mentor. She'd developed an aptitude for ranged combat, starting with a slingshot as a kid. Only real mentor was Scholar, but he's not really involved in any of the gun stuff.
    • Why the names "Pride" and "Prejudice"? Part of it's due to her upbringing around all these people with themed names. It wouldn't have occurred to her to not name the guns. They didn't have a lot of intent behind the names - but they were mentioning personality aspects of Amanda herself (she's prideful and she is prejudiced against people with powers).
    • Who's the blond man on her Quick Draw card? Ambuscade (w/ facial prosthetics) in disguise as a cop. There's some great French accents going on here at around 1:11:11 in the podcast.
    • Relationship with the Scholar? They already discussed a lot of it. She's "one of many" that he found, picked up, and put back together in one way or another. Later it's more like how you would react to running into a fondly-remembered high school teacher years later.
    • How does the flak jacket stop huge amounts of damage? Just an artifact of the game mechanics. They're nice jackets, but it's not realistic.
    • Does she really have no powers at all? What's her most super power? Purple hair. Unless Olympic athletes have "powers" due to the amount of training they've done.
    • Tactics - still tactical leader of Dark Watch (they're not really organized as having a leader, but Setback often takes points and she does the planning). Still set up in what's left of Rook City and this is a darker future, but they're trying to be a source of hope. She's got some new ammo: Gravity Rounds, Concussion Rounds, Biotic Rounds. There had been a time after the loss of Nightmist and the breaking of Rook City when the team disbanded - duo comic from this time "Lucky Shot" about her and Setback before they cycled back around to link back up with Mr. Fixer and Pinion.
    • RPG - Rook City wasn't as demolished. There's various groups doing rebuilding. Dark Watch isn't really just limited to the four of them. She and Setback act as the field operatives, a "fighting duo" and are still active "working" heroes, but the two of them aren't taking on the mentorly role that many other of the canon heroes do at this point.

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

F.I.L.T.E.R./References

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Confirmed

  • Of named members we only know of KNYFE who is a former member of this group and Sergeant Steel who is a current member
  • Their main known location is the Block

To Other Works

  • This group deals with threats to the planet and contains villains like S.H.I.E.LD. from Marvel and the Agency from DC

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page 22 - F.I.L.T.E.R.
    • Since F.I.L.T.E.R. has personnel in multiple timelines, is there only one F.I.L.T.E.R. organization? Which reality did it originate in? Only one organization, which originated in the main timeline.
    • How is the Block administered (question assumes that there are multiple F.I.L.T.E.R. organizations)? Only the one F.I.L.T.E.R. which then spiders out into various realities, but things are managed from the Block as a central headquarters, with Warden Hoefle running the Block itself, but Felix Stone running the larger F.I.L.T.E.R. group. The various realities' branch offices have "middle-management" officers in the different realities to help run stuff "locally", but the "stable" portals allow fairly quick response from the main office.
    • F.I.L.T.E.R. seems to have started as a benign "Men in Black" organization, but during the prison riots the officers fire on heroes there to help and Sgt. Steel will work with villains, at this point is F.I.L.T.E.R. evil? How about Steel himself? If there's a prison riot, and you're part of the fighting but aren't officers yourselves, the guards aren't likely to take kindly to you no matter what the situation is. Sergeant Steel is working against a hero, and therefore might qualify as a "villain" by certain definitions, but he's also working under orders. Can an organization, as opposed to the people in it, be "evil"? They're not strictly speaking a "hero team", they're locking up villains but that's more for their benefit than for some societal good, but they are keeping bad guys locked up.
    • Which reality is responsible for the creation of F.I.L.T.E.R.? Do they recruit members from different timelines? Do they recruit multiple realities' versions of the same person? The Block is outside time, F.I.L.T.E.R. is from the "main" timeline, they do recruit people from different realities (K.N.Y.F.E. for one). They don't generally recruit the "same" person multiple times - people take different paths through life, but it's also logistically tricky to do so - but it can happen.
    • F.I.L.T.E.R. Spy (from Time Cataclysm) looks like the Espionagent (from Sergeant Steel's deck) - are they the same person? Does this mean that F.I.L.T.E.R. was caught up in the Cataclysm or were they just exploiting it (or even behind it)? OblivAeon caused the Time Cataclysm. The Spy and Espionagent aren't the same individual as they're the "same" person from different realities (one of the rare exceptions mentioned in the previous answer) and they get sent on disparate missions to keep things from getting too confusing. The Time Cataclysm touches all environments, including the Block.
    • F.I.L.T.E.R. seems choosy about who they incarcerate, why do Char, Kismet, and Choke wind up there while seemingly more dangerous villains wind up in normal prisons? Given that it's an inter-dimensional prison, the stated number of inmates (under 500) seems small, is there a reason? How much to the heroes know about what all F.I.L.T.E.R. is getting up to? A lot of the more modern reasons for only certain prisoners winding up there is a general unwillingness of some heroes (who've started to catch on to the shady stuff F.I.L.T.E.R. is up to) to work with them/turn villains over to them - especially due to the lack of official governmental affiliation. As far as the number of prisoners, F.I.L.T.E.R. is a for-profit organization at this point and they'll frequently capture a powered person in one reality and will then sell that person off to another reality.
    • Is Char the most dangerous inmate? What did he do to earn a spot as the only named prisoner in the deck? Did he already have his sweet "firearm" tattoo or did he get it while on the inside? He already had the tattoo. He gets named because he already had a background due to an affiliation with Fright Train, but he's also one of the more prominent villains present there who's not already represented in some other deck (Spite, Fright Train, Set, etc. all have other, more important appearances, but some of them are from other realities too).
    • Is Sgt. Steel from the main timeline or K.N.Y.F.E.'s home timeline? How about the rest of the team? Is F.I.L.T.E.R. generally from a mix of realities or was K.N.Y.F.E. an exception? Sgt. Steel is from a timeline other than both K.N.Y.F.E. and the main reality. The squad are from a mix of realities, too, but it's not like they're all explicitly from unique timelines (the Arsonator and Mega-Gunner are from the main timeline and had fought Bunker all the way back in his debut comic - see the cover art on the 3rd page of the pdf). F.I.L.T.E.R. personnel started as being from the main timeline, but has expanded into a mix since they found the Block.
    • In Sgt. Steel's deck we get to know his team and that they're specific characters - how does one get onto the team? Do they need to replace people periodically (supposing a high turnover rate due to getting the tough jobs), how often? Would we see the recruitment happen in F.I.L.T.E.R. comics? Are members characters that readers would already be familiar with? This team was formerly K.N.Y.F.E.'s team - Jack Steel, Bomb Specialist, Arsonator, Espionagent, Field Inventor, Infiltrationist, and a few others (not the same as the rest of the team as shown in the deck as Steel added Sharpshooter, Mega-Gunner, and Battle Medic to the team once he assumed command). Arsonator knew Mega-Gunner and got him recruited, but generally you get consideration for a slot for past accomplishments (especially wet-work jobs).
    • Since Steel is a "Vengeance-Style" team villain deck, does he work with other villains considering that he's mostly out to get K.N.Y.F.E. specifically and they seem to capture her on their own? They eventually got her without help, but that doesn't mean that they didn't try to get help prior to that. On Earth they worked with Miss Information, offering to help against the Freedom Five in exchange. They hired Greazer to help once they're chasing her out in space (which did not go well for Greazer). [I'll also point out that it's mentioned that they work with Biomancer and Citizens Hammer and Anvil when they're going after Visionary back in the Expatriette episode]
    • When Setback worked in a copy shop, somebody dropped F.I.L.T.E.R. documents that he found. Who was that? What was the document? Why didn't F.I.L.T.E.R. have their own copy machine? Was the shop torn down by a real construction crew or was that a coverup? The person was a high-ranking officer from a local outpost. It was a manifest of prisoners transferred from that outpost to the Block. He wasn't there to copy that document, he was getting some personal stuff done and he couldn't use the work machine for that. F.I.L.T.E.R. used a real construction crew to tear the place down as a coverup.
    • In the Vengeful Five episode, it was mentioned that Baron Blade blew a hole in the wall to break Fright Train out, but given that the Block is in another dimension/out in space how did Blade manage this? Null Space has breathable air. Blade is a mad scientist and builds his own portal to get there and then just blows up a wall to let people out/through his portal.
    • Given that F.I.L.T.E.R. visits multiple universes, are there prisoners from different ones? Are there lots of copies of the same person? How big is it? Like with recruiting multiple versions of a person, it can happen, but not often. The Block has a fairly high turnover of inmates given their trafficking of people to different realities. They tiptoed around it earlier, but F.I.L.T.E.R. is pretty Evil by the end of the story.
    • Given "F.I.L.T.E.R." and "K.N.Y.F.E." it seems that somebody there is a fan of acronyms, is it just one person or a committee? It's a committee, Agents for Creating Robust and Original Names Yoking Meaning.
    • The flavor text of Time Crazed Prisoner implies he's aware of OblivAeon and the multiverse in general, who is he? He's just some guy, but he's been there for long enough that he's gone crazy from being there - but in one of those "only the insane can grasp the truth" kind of ways. All of the crazy stuff on his wall are true things - there are no red-herrings in the card art. F.I.L.T.E.R. figures out pretty quickly that long-term exposure to Null Space can cause a form of madness and do a good job of rotating out their personnel regularly. The Warden and other people that need to be there a lot have required periods that they have to cycle out, although Felix Stone doesn't.
  • Bonus Question Section About The Character We Didn't Know About And Therefore Couldn't Have Asked About:
    • Was Felix Stone always a megalomaniac out to meddle in these other realities for personal power/gain? No, he was always a little greedy/self-serving, but was just a normal bureaucrat.
    • What made him go off the deep end? Null Space Madness, to some extent, but also this resulted in him drawing the attention of Voidsoul ("the whispers of doubt and madness that OblivAeon likes to traffic in") who made him think that all of these crashing realities and whatnot were fine and that things would work out for the best for him. This is why K.N.Y.F.E. gets what amounts to a dismissal when she brings her worries to her superiors - the word from the top is that they are aware of what's going on and they have a handle on it, don't worry and shut up.

Sources


Fanatic/References

Edit this Reference

Artwork

  • Apostate is seen blocking a strike on "Smite the Transgressor", and is also being stabbed by Fanatic on "Zealous Offense".
  • The demon that Fanatic is fighting on "Sacrosanct Martyr" is the Illusory Demon, one of The Dreamer's projections. Curiously, it is much smaller in comparison to Fanatic than it is to Chrono-Ranger on the card "Sudden Contract."
  • "Brutal Censure" shows Fanatic blasting the face of The Idolater.
  • "Chastise" reveals Fanatic using her powers to neutralize the "Fiendish Pugilist" demon from Apostate's deck.
  • "Divine Focus" portrays Fanatic hovering over and blasting Grand Warlord Voss.

Confirmed

  • To add to the conversation on Fanatic's personality, she doesn't call herself "Fanatic". That's her hero name, sure, and it's definitely the name of her comic book, but she never refers to herself as that. Imagine the sort of person it would take to call themselves "Fanatic". She isn't that person. She calls herself "Angel of the Lord", "The Lord's Agent", and even "Judgement", but not Fanatic. That is what other people call her.[1]
  • Fanatics's Aegis and Sword have power because Fanatic believes they should have power. We did not learn the source of Fanatic's power and whether or not she is "divine".[2]
  • Fanatic's Letters Page errata her First appearance from Mystery Comics #368 to Mystery Comics #338

To Other Works

  • The flavor text of the card "Holy Nova" is the lyrics to Dio's song Holy Diver - Similarly Apostate's Fallen Angel is from Fallen Angels
  • The flavor text on "Undaunted" is a reference to the famous Black Knight scene in "Monty Python and the Holy Grail".
  • Though the images aren't complete matches, the art on Fanatic's incapacitated side may be an homage to this image of Angel from the X-Men pinned to the wall by the Morlock Harpoon's energy weapons in X-Factor #10 ("Falling Angel").
  • As a winged female superhero armed with superpowered melee weapons, Fanatic bears a notable resemblance to Hawkgirl, a DC comics superhero. This comparison is somewhat ironic though, as Hawkgirl and her species, the Thanagarians, are devoutly atheist.
  • XTREME Prime Wardens Fanatic's outfit is very similar to the one worn by Psylocke of the X-Men, though the way she wears her sash is more similar to Phoenix (Jean Grey) or Ms. Marvel (Carol Danvers). The flare of light coming from her left eye resembles the flares depicted when the X-Men Cable and Longshot use their powers.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • She was interesting to design given that she was so different from all of the other heroes in the core set. They knew they wanted somebody with wings who could fly and had a sword and so they just dropped an angel in there. She kind of worked out as an anti-hero given that she had no problems killing people - Ra might wind up burning people too, but nobody was carrying around a sword that they'd use to just straight up kill an opponent.
  • Questions: Questions Answered on Podcast Episode 37
    • When Apostate claimed to have created her, did she believe him or did it not matter where her powers came from as long as she used them for good? How long was she off thinking about what he'd said before she returned? While she and Apostate really are the "same" in that their origins are the same and neither is really an "angel", she didn't believe him and kept her faith. Her outlook and goals are different from his, and that makes a difference. As mentioned, she was off in seclusion for three days.
    • Who were her parents? Literally doesn't matter since the history of that little girl became unimportant once she died. This question is kind of abrogated by the reveal on Fanatics origins given above.
    • Did she really die when she was six? The body did, what came back as Helena/Fantic is a different "person".
    • Why did she recover so quickly/grow wings? Already covered.
    • What words did she hear in her vision? Not really words, just the concepts/visions of the spirits.
    • Did she really spend a year in the catacombs without food? How did she survive? Yes and because she's not a person.
    • How does Absolution manifest flames? Because she wills it to be so. This can take a variety of forms from the blade itself being engulfed in flames, to shooting flames from it, to using it to set other things on fire.
    • What did Apostate do/say to make her question her faith? Already covered.
    • What's the deal with Fanatic carving runes into things as she sleeps? That's a feature of how she's exerting changes on the world - the sword should have "angelic" runes, so she does so in a "miraculous" way.
    • Is Absolution breaking while she fights Citizen Truth related to her fight with Baron Blade (and his Negation Bands) during Vengeance? No, they're unrelated events and the bands didn't weaken the structure of the sword itself.
    • How did she handle the breaking of her sword? Shaken at first, but then her obstinate personality takes over and justifies it as "of course it breaks, it's just an earthly sword" and it's obviously just as good as ever in its current form anyway, right?
    • Some Vengeance art has her in non-Redeemer outfit, does this mean that the Apostate event was prior to Vengeance? No, Apostate was first. As was mentioned in the very first Interlude, the costume doesn't necessarily tell you what time it is. A lot of the costume choices can vary depending on the comic creators at the time, but other than major physical changes the appearance isn't a good indication of timeline (for example, the state of Baron Blade's scar is a better indication of when we are than what outfit he's wearing). A new outfit is typically a response to some kind of character change/event, but after that it's fair game. Even within the Prime Wardens book, while she's more likely to be in the "team costume", she still shows up in her original and Redeemer outfits occasionally.
    • What's the explanation for her first appearance being listed as Mystery Comics #368, while "Holy Nova" lists MC #367 with text from Apostate who's listed as first appearing in Fanatic #25? Another mistake on their end, Fanatic's first appearance should be listed as Mystery Comics #338. This leads us into a nice aside about the publishing history that they didn't go into in the overview:
      • She first appears in Mystery Comics and was a runaway hit right away. This resulted in her getting her solo series, Fanatic, within about six months of her introduction. That title ran for quite a while, including the Apostate story (which was always presented as "this is what Apostate is claiming is the truth" rather than "this is actually the truth"), only ending not so much because the book was unpopular but because it was kind of getting overwrought and needed a "soft reboot" to get back to basics. The new book is Absolution, which is back to her doing incredibly metal things like fighting magical baddies with a huge sword, but also deals with defining stuff like her sword and armor and more backstory stuff as her origin hadn't been clearly laid out rather than in bits and pieces.
    • Within the imaginary world where Sentinel Comics are published, how did readers respond to her character? Did people who went through incredible healing identify with her? Did people shun or embrace her based on the faith/judgement aspects or ignore her because she's just a comics character? Did people have things like necklaces with her iconic cross emblem? This world is pretty identical to our own, only with the existence of Sentinel Comics as the biggest publisher. The world reacted to the existence of a angelic/crusader/warrior lady in comics about how you would expect. Some Christian groups were scandalized that there was a "Christian" character killing people with a sword, while others appreciated that there was a Christian hero at all, and yet others were like "look guys, it's just a comic character". Her introduction was also around the dawn of heavy metal and the whole satanic panic thing and there were people coming down on either side of that with regards to her. Opinions were decidedly mixed. Sure, people wore the cross necklace, but it's not like Sentinel Comics invented that symbol.
    • Is Fanatic the kind of Angel who would destroy the Cult of Gloom or would she try to save them? She's definitely more on the smite end of things. She's a spirit of judgement, but also an entity of faith - by her nature she's pure judgement, but this is tempered by the belief system she's imprinted on to give her the concept of mercy. She judges on the basis of action - and she judges faultlessly - but if the Cult is just kind of moping around as they've realized the pointless nature of reality, she's got no reason to smite them as they're not doing anything wrong. If they've, instead, settled on doing rituals to bring more darkness into the world of course she's going to go with the smiting option. This makes her interesting in that her approach to people isn't based on their lifestyle (which she may or may not actually agree with), but on their actions.
    • She does Radiant damage and her power source is listed as Divine, so is she really an angel? Was she always an angel, even before the accident? A lot of this is already answered. Radiant isn't unique to her (Citizen Dawn for example [this is likely a misstatement as Dawn's *SotM* deck has no radiant damage, even if it might be logical for her to deal it - however, Zhu Long's True Form, Progeny, the vampire-hunter Fulepet, Scholar, and anybody with an ability to choose from any damage type like Mr. Fixer or Chrono-Ranger also deal it]), but by "Divine" it's meant that it's power from an unknown force out of our understanding in some other realm and in her case (being a spirit of the Host) it's "divine" in nature, but without defining which specific divinity is actually involved.
    • Does she do downtime? No, she does not. Unlike most characters who are fully fleshed out people, she's not people. She has some people-like characteristics (and angelic ones - "she's as much a person as she is an angel") - she looks/functions/acts like both of those things, but she's not really either. A lot of her "humanity" is what's imprinted on her by being around people. People are important to to her because of her belief system, but that's all stuff she's picked up from the world, what she brings is justice.
    • If she thinks that she's an angel, why not give herself an angelic name (going back to Hebrew, for example, to give a name that exemplifies who she is)? She was given the name Helena by people who are doing the work of the Lord (and it's a strong name, and the name of a saint), so who is she to change that? Later on, when she takes up the name "Fanatic", that's kind of the moment when she is choosing the name that's emblematic of who she is.
    • Her deck has self-damage only outclassed by Absolute Zero (whom the very air burns) and Nightmist (who's dealing with forces that man was not meant to know), so what does this model in-setting for her? Her power is taxing to her human form (which she has a reckless disregard for); the way that she fights involves throwing herself into danger and pushing her own limits - she fights beyond what she should be able to do as the spirit sustains her. She also has a serious martyr complex going on.
    • What is happening in "Wrathful Retribution"? That's a crossover between her book, the Prime Wardens book, and some of the other members' solo series. This is a fight (but not the first fight) with Akash'Bhuta and the landscape itself is the target for the damage here.
    • How frequently does she overreact/use overkill? Does this effect how she works with other heroes? She definitely often argues with other heroes and they in turn have hold her back in some way. You definitely wouldn't want her involved in foiling a simple bank robbery as she'd probably immediately just go into "kick down the door and smite the evildoers" mode, possibly destroying the bank in the process. This is a good example of comics slotting heroes into the appropriate threat levels - you just don't see her operating at "street level" as she's always going to be overkill for such threats. But if you need to kill a thousand aliens, she's your girl. It's also why Prime Wardens is a good fit for her - you need grand mythic threats if you want her to be around. Then you get the occasional issue where she is on hand for these low-level things to remind you of just why you don't want Fanatic to be around all the time.
    • What's happening on "End of Days"? Does she always have access to such face-melting power or was it a one-off? Those are Gloomweaver zombies, and lots of them. She can do that level of things pretty routinely, but she cares a lot about collateral damage to other people (herself or buildings are fair game). She might not necessarily be aware that she can just do this whenever, but when the chips are down she might stop to say a quick prayer and then come back with the strength that the Lord has given her to then nuke the site from orbit. She thinks that those steps are necessary, and therefore they are.
    • The Gen Con episode mentioned a terrible storyline where Fanatic took a tour through all religions, was this in-continuity or in titles like Disparation that have less impact on the ongoing character? That did happen in the canon timeline, but was a gross misappropriation by some writer who was trying to make some kind of statement (but it wasn't even clear what that statement was) and in doing so wrote something that completely betrayed who the character is. There's probably a story you could do about her changing her mind over time, but that's not what happened here. The story was quickly forgotten and never brought up again in the comics.
    • Why is the art of her having defeated Idolator (on her foil character card) on her incapacitated side - is it supposed to represent some emotional defeat? Definitely an emotional thing - she's just burned down a church and burned a cross into the face of a man who she'd trusted and she's sad that her judgement was as off as it was in this case. This is "incapacitating" because this is "a thing that shakes her faith" and that's really the only thing that can really "take her apart".
    • What's the character on the Seer's belt buckle? It's just a design - it's not a character from a writing system.
    • If Fanatic has met the Judeo-Christian God, how does that jibe with the tangible existence of other belief systems (like Ra, Calypso, or Quetzalcoatl)? She easily explains it away ("They're not really Quetzalcoatl, but just somebody with power claiming to be"). Even the Egyptian deities aren't really deities as they're just myths built up around people with powers who, nowadays, are just called superheroes. The question has a flawed premise, however, as Fanatic never met (nor claimed to have met) God. She's a character of faith, and if she had met and been given a mission by God, she would not be a character of faith at that point. Her faith is in that she "has a holy mission that she is sent on to make the world a better place by defeating evil" and the parameters of that are wide open and require her to make judgement calls. That faith is shaken frequently, but that's a key component: that it withstands testing and "meeting God" kind of negates testing. The guys are of the opinion that none of the facts of her origin (being a spirit of the Host inhabiting a formerly deceased body) prevent there being a God out there who is giving her power and rewarding her faith - and that's kind of the point, they're not making the statement that God does or doesn't exist in Sentinel-verse; it's a matter of faith (and regardless of everything else about her, you can't say that her faith doesn't give Fanatic power).

Sources


Fashion/References

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Confirmed

  • She predates most of Sentinel Comics, back into the '20s and '30s - they were essentially romance comics aimed at young girls used mostly as marketing tools. Several publishers of these got bought up by the company that would eventually be Sentinel Comics (this is similar to how Sheriff Jim Brooks appeared in Western comics before being brought back in the superhero era, although without the successful arc that he had). There was a book titled Stylin' Shirley starring Shirley Shane who was a model, the most popular girl with all the best clothes and boy trouble. Once she got rolled into Sentinel Comics, she'd been reintroduced a few years before Kaargra's first appearance. Now she's also an inventor in addition to a model, now called "Fashion" - she's got all these great clothes that also can turn into whatever she happens to need in her crimefighting ("her inventions are also her outfits"). She's not a bad character - the more the guys talked about her and how stupid the setup was the more they decided they liked her (Adam then explains the joke about why "fashion" is a good name for an inventor/model, much to Christopher's exasperation). Unfortunately, the readers didn't like her as much as C&A do. They used the Bloodsworn Colosseum as an excuse to write her out of the comics - she's forced to fight, she loses, and when it leaves Earth it takes her with it. She's not seen again until the next major Colosseum event where she's now barely recognizable (and is a deep cut for careful readers) - she's S'Sdari the Bloody and has developed a much different personality.

Sources


Faultless/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Felix Stone/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Fort Adamant/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Freedom Tower/References

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Artwork

  • "Caspit's Playground", being Unity's workshop, shows her creating Mechanical Golem versions of several members of The Ennead, specifically Atum, Isis, Osiris, Geb, and Nephthys.
  • "Frost's Cryo Chamber" is a repeat of Absolute Zero's "Cryo Chamber", although now effecting more than just AZ himself.
  • "Ironclad Maintenance Bay" is similar to the site shown on Bunker's "Decommissioned Hardware". Tyler Vance is shown inspecting his suits.

Confirmed

Sources


Friction/References

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Artwork

  • Friction is found on the card "Scum and Villainy" in the Rook City Environment Deck
  • “Supersonic Streak” features Friction running through an abstract environment with checkered soil, bright green grass, and towering loops. Fans of the Sonic the Hedgehog video game series will recognize this location as the GreenHill Zone from the original Sonic the Hedgehog on the Sega Genesis. Unity’s golems stand in for the “badnik” enemies which populated that zone.
  • The card “Unchecked Acceleration” features Writhe being struck through by a speedster yet again, Friction this time. This happened to him before at the hands of Tachyon on the card “Supersonic Response.”

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • As an evil super-speedster with an inverted color scheme to a heroic super-speedster (Tachyon), Friction is evocative of Eobard Thawn, the Reverse Flash, the arch-nemesis of the Flash. In addition to these similarities, both Friction and the Reverse Flash idolized their nemesis before seeking their destruction.
  • The artwork for Friction’s Incapacitated side is a reference to the Flash comics. More than one DC Comics speedster, the Flash included, has been disintegrated from abusing the power of the Speed Force, the mysterious energy field which gives all super-fast heroes and villains their powers. The best known example was in Crisis on Infinite Earths #7, in which the silver-age flash, Barry Allen, pushed his powers to the limits to stop the evil Anti-Monitor, and was subsequently withered to dust.
  • The art on “Unhealthy Speed” is an homage to the first issue of the “Flash: Rebirth” miniseries by Geoff Johns.
  • Friction is phasing her hand through Setback’s chest on the card “Blinding Surge.” Numerous DC speedsters are able to do this as well, including the Flash.
  • As a villain made of liquid metal, Argentium seems to be an homage to the T-1000 from the James Cameron movie “Terminator 2.” The fact that he is pictured in a steel mill, the same setting as the film’s climax, furthers the comparison.
  • Revenant is named after a monster European folklore. The creatures in the original tales were corpses that rose from their graves in search of vengeance on those that wronged them in life. The creatures were often impossible to kill outside of strange/magical means. Aside from his flavor text, not much about the robotic Setback nemesis bears a resemblance to his namesake.
  • As a large, burly villain who dresses like a large, burly animal, the Hippo is a clear homage to the Rhino, a Spider-Man villain.
  • Highbrow bears a strong resemblance to both members of the Brain Trust, a villainous psychic duo who first appeared in the second issue of DC’s “Kingdom Come” miniseries.

Sources


Fright Train/References

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Artwork

  • Fright Train’s appearance and fondness for train-based puns make him a dead-ringer for Augustus “Cole-Train” Cole from the Gears of War video game series.
  • Fright Train is unmasked as Knyfe smashes him through a wall on the card "Wrecking Uppercut"

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Fright Train’s powers greatly resemble those of the Marvel character Juggernaut.
  • Fright Train's incapacitated art is a visual reference to the cover of Uncanny X-Men #322 which asks the question "Who stopped the Juggernaut" (the answer eventually revealed to be Onslaught) - Fright Train, K.N.Y.F.E., Naturalist, and Setback stand in for Juggernaut, Psylocke, Beast, and Bishop respectively.

Sources


Fyodor Ramonat/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Galactra/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • As a female character with a similar power set to but opposing Captain Cosmic, Galactra has a striking resemblance to the Green Lantern characters known as Star Sapphire.

Sources


Geb/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


General Armstrong/References

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Confirmed

  • Mentioned first in Letters Page, Episode 8
    • Termi-Nation arc involves a lot of Bunker stuff as Chokepoint was being held at Fort Adamant by General Armstrong, who was in charge of the Ironclad project, but also turned out to be involved in a lot of shady stuff (there will be a Termi-Nation podcast). It results in the new, modular, mostly ceramic Bunker suit being built, though. The modular technology also plays into Omnitron V's ability to transform as much as it does in Tactics.

Sources


Glamour/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letter Page Episode 14
    • Tachyon loves dealing with Glamour since she is a big fan of magicians and being tricked. Often this irritates Glamour who is trying to get rid of her.
  • From Letter Page Episode 19
    • The Shrieker an original Freedom Four/Five member in golden age Sentinels Comics becomes the four incarnation of the villain and the one we see in Ambuscade's VotM deck
    • In the Tactics timeline Miss Information is the current Glamour
    • As Glamour Miss Information manages to kill Tachyon in the Tactics Timeline

To Other Works

  • The Sentinels Tactics bio implies that multiple people have been behind the mask at different times. This is similar to DC's Red Hood, which was initially used to make several accomplices to crimes look like the work of a single mastermind.
  • A reflective-masked villain focusing on misdirection and tricks is strongly evocative of Spider-man villain Mysterio.

Sources


Gloomweaver/References

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Confirmed

  • Richard Launius created Nightmist and his nemesis purely as a fan thing, the >G crew saw his efforts and asked if he would like to co-design an expansion with them. The previous nemesis of Nightmist can be seen here
    • Talking about Richard Launius:
      • Co-designer of the Arkham Horror board game (both the original Chaosium version and the Fantasy Flight remake) and of Fate of the Elder Gods by Greater Than Games. He had made some fan decks of Nightmist and Realm of Discord that got reimagined/redesigned when made official decks, but GloomWeaver began as the villain Key Master (made of bones, gates to other realities, etc.) but for story reasons they needed to change stuff up.

To Other Works

  • Physically and conceptually, Gloomweaver is very similar to the Marvel villain Dormamu.
  • In the flavor text of "Vast Following," Cult Leader Massey refers to Gloomweaver with the moniker "Dread." This is another reference to Dormamu, who frequently goes by that same moniker.
  • The "Grimoire of Curses" is virtually identical to the Necronomicon Ex Mortis from the film Evil Dead. The Necronomicon made it's first appearance in the short story "The Hound" by HP Lovecraft, and became a popular McGuffin in many stories of the Cthulhu mythos and it's role playing/board game spin-offs. One of those board games was Arkham Horror by Richard Launius. Richard Launius is the creator of both Gloomweaver and Nightmist.
  • The art on "Strength of the Grave" is evocative of Mike Mignolia, the artist/writer/creator of Hellboy.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page Episode 13
      • During the ARG leading up to the OblivAeon reveal we learn that the appearance of Spite Agent of Gloom was during a run of Dark Watch issues that cover the OblivAeon events - so, what were Spite and GloomWeaver's roles during the OblivAeon events? The issues of comics that are shown in the ARG are not the OblivAeon event proper, but are lead up to it. DW 13-18 are not during the OblivAeon event, so DW 17 being the appearance of Agent of Gloom is still in that run-up phase.
      • Were villains other than Spite working with GloomWeaver, in particular, is the obelisk in the Skinwalker card art the same as Apostate's "Runes of Malediction"? Any further tie-ins to other major events in the comics (like OblivAeon)? No, GloomWeaver just used Spite and doesn't really make friends to the point of working with others (other than his cultists, who hardly count). Obelisk is just an obelisk. Repercussions: it was a major event that brought in a bunch of people, introduced Lifeline as a hero, lasting importance on Dr. Medico. Good way to prep for OblivAeon without being directly related to OblivAeon.
      • Was GloomWeaver banished or destroyed? If banished, does whatever's left of Nightmist keep him from returning or would another hero or team need to step up. If destroyed, is that related to why Nightmist chose to become the gate? Neither, he's imprisoned in Dr. Medico's OblivAeon Shard. "That's probably not concerning and shouldn't be a problem for anyone." - Christopher
      • Did GloomWeaver try to contact Spite after his skinwalker plot failed? No, since there's no more GloomWeaver free in the Realm of Discord to contact anybody. More in Future section here and in Spite's episode.
      • What's up with Ophidia and the "familiar" keyword, since there's no mechanics supporting that keyword? Ophidia was the necromancer's familiar before he did the ritual to become GloomWeaver. Part of that ritual was that he had to be killed *by* his familiar, but even in the RoD he has his connection to Ophidia. That connection is what allows him to still influence things in the real world, even after Ophidia dies (and becomes a "ghost snake"). So, as an example, while Spite was stuck in his dead body for years, Ophidia is the entity in there with him feeding him GloomWeaver's power.
      • Which hero is canonically the first to fight Gloomweaver and his cult? Cult first fought by Black Fist and Wraith - probably Wraith first. First to fight GloomWeaver and the cult were the Freedom Five plus Nightmist (who they brought in for that purpose).
      • Is the Master related to all of this Gloomweaver stuff? Yes. The Master, Nightmist's trainer, is Xian Niu [spelling confirmed], a Cultist of GloomWeaver - he's around for a long time before readers find this out. He helped Massey acquire the relics, but still secretive - he's an agent for them, but keeps hands-off enough to remain apart from them. The ritual gone-wrong that gave Nightmist her power was noticed by GloomWeaver and he sent his top agent to deal with that and so the Master trains her up to increase her power, but he's also been siphoning off her power the whole time - the goal being to use that power all at once to overwrite reality with the Realm of Discord - not just letting him "break through" but making them the same place, which would essentially make him unbeatable. During the Skinwalker event, Nightmist and Harpy were off getting ready to do the Gate ritual she finds and taps into a big source of power she finds, the Master's "capacitor" that he'd been charging this whole time - she's able to tap into and use it so easily because it was already hers. She does this at a moment when he was working on the capacitor and he gets really messed up by the resulting magical explosion.
      • What does Zhu Long know about GloomWeaver (and vice versa)? They know about each other, but neither really has anything that the other wants. They both kind of have cults, but aren't rivals.
      • Who is Cult Leader Massey? He was a sorcerer, doing his own thing, but who then discovers this source of power but sees the high turn-over rate (ritual suicides and whatnot). He reorganizes things to make them run more efficiently (and to not be a sacrifice himself) with the expectation that GloomWeaver will give him power once he's brought through. This doesn't quite work out as the first thing that GloomWeaver does upon manifesting is to consume Massey's soul as a last bit of power gain as he comes through.
      • What happens to the various cultists in the decks: dead, imprisoned, elsewhere? Mostly dead. The Cult doesn't leave many alternatives.
      • GloomWeaver is a major nemesis for Nightmist, is she a major one for him? Have there been others through the ages? She's a thorn in his side, and she's been his primary barrier to entry lately, but there have been others in the past (hinted at last week). He's a slow, patient player. Things have been starting to coalesce over the last few centuries, she just happens to be the most capable to oppose him right now.
      • Are GloomWeaver/Cult stories the general content of Tome of the Bizarre and how long has it been around? Reiterating the history given piecemeal above: Horror comic in the '40s and '50s before getting shut down by the CCA rules - it was mostly sorcerers and cultists doing "shocking" stuff. Then a second run in the modern age, the one generally cited in SotM content. It's a superhero book, but an anthology one that doesn't follow a specific hero, it just has mostly magic-related stuff going on.
      • How did Joe Diamond run afoul of GloomWeaver? Joe had been a prior "thorn in GloomWeaver's side" much like his granddaughter would be later, foiling plots to bring him over. GloomWeaver eventually manages to trick him into performing a ritual nominally to lock GloomWeaver out forever, but really designed to recreate the necromancer's original one - pulling Joe into the Realm of Discord. The reason we generally see him with the glowing orb that is Joe's essence is because much of when we see him is specifically when he's opposing Nightmist and he brings it out to taunt her - it's not particularly important to him.
      • Why does he hold onto Joe in the first place? He's a magically-powerful soul and it's better to let it accrue more power over time and slowly drain it. Also works as a possible bargaining chip with other magicians later. He's also just a jerk.
      • How big is GloomWeaver, can he change size/appearance? In the Realm of Discord he can pretty much be whatever he wants (and has changed his "normal" appearance over the centuries. The Skinwalker form is about 8 feet tall, the Rotting God is about 30 feet tall. He has much less control in the real world, he can change size a little, but needs matter to do so.
      • Why does he have a reptilian tail as Skinwalker, he doesn't in his old form? Every version of him has a big weird alligator tail.
      • When Nightmists banishes foes, can GloomWeaver interact with them? She's not banishing things to the Realm of Discord or to the Void. She's banishing them outside of time and space; they are nowhere and nowhen.
      • Did GloomWeaver have a hand in other big comic events? Every villain deck is a "major event". Gloomweaver's are his "first appearance" in FFA #6 (introduced him and Nightmist, reorganized the cult's status as a thing in the comics by giving it a focus), the big fight that came out of Fabric of Despair which represents his deck and normal character cards, and Skinwalker represented by the corresponding promo.
      • With the Multiverse ended and realities blocked off from one another, does that mean that he can't cause problems anymore? He's not limited by the closing of realities as much as he is by being imprisoned currently. The deeper question here, though, is that the Realm of Discord isn't a different "reality" in the way implied by the "multiverse". It's a different dimension/realm/whatever of the same universe as the card-game-timeline (each reality has its own version of it).
      • Can the Realm of Discord be accessed easily? How close is it to the Void or the place where Nightmist became a magical creature? The Realm of Discord is the "ethereal realm", sometimes you go there when you dream, etc. The "good for doing magic" places mentioned in the Nightmist episode (swamps, old cathedrals, abandoned insane asylums, etc.) are good places to cross over as the veil is thinner in such places. It's not particularly easy to get there, but certainly possible. Nightmist got her powers from the Void - they're the same place. The Void is its own thing and isn't really related to the RoD.
      • "The Pouch of Bones" has flavor text attributed to Tony Taurus, who eventually becomes Heartbreaker - did GloomWeaver influence him into becoming a villain? Tony was driven to snap by many events. The encounter with GloomWeaver did not help, but there was no intention there.
      • Whose bones are in the Pouch of Bones, why does GloomWeaver carry it, what do they do? His bones (the necromancer). They're preserved by the ritual that created him in the first place, protected by Ophidia. The Pouch was used specifically in the Skinwalker ritual to give him a new physical form - the first mortal form he had for tens of thousands of years. It's a necromantic relic - it doesn't really do anything itself, but it makes necromantic stuff happening near it more likely to work.

Sources


Grand Warlord Voss/References

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Artwork

  • Voss' Gene-Bound Psi-Weavers are genetically modified Piunites, the last non-modified one is found in the Enclave of the Endlings, Phrentat.
  • Voss' Gene-Bound Bionauts are genetically modified Mubbloxians, the last non-modified one is found in the Enclave of the Endlings, Venox.

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Unconfirmed

  • Voss' Gene-Bound Shock Infantry are genetically modified Maerynians.

To Other Works

  • Grand Warlord Voss bears a strong resemblance to the Marvel villain Thanos, who in turn resembles the DC villain Darkseid.
  • The "Gene-Bound" soldier looks exactly like the "Grays" of UFO pop-culture.
  • Voss' emblem looks stylistically similar to the symbol of the Irken Empire from Johnan Vasquez's Invader Zim cartoon.
  • The "Quark-Drive Translocator" resembles the "Boom Tube" portals used in the DC Universe.

Sources


Greazer Clutch/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • His appearance is similar to those from movies like Grease and the Fonz from Happy Days (the former referenced by the name of his vehicle, the Pink Lady, and the latter furthered by his hitting the jukebox-like H.Y.P. Displacer to make it work).
  • His concern for his hair was pretty standard for any Greaser as damage to it was certainly a blow to their ego
  • He has a lot similarities to Lobo as they are both intergalactic bounty hunters of an alien race. They also both have a notable vehicle they use traceing wherever their next job takes them.

Sources


Green Grosser/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • The name is a play in the word Greengrocer which is a retail trader in fruit and vegetables
  • As a grinning, green-skinned villain who throws around explosives shaped like pieces of produce, he's similar to Spider-man's nemesis, The Green Goblin.

Sources


Gregory Nolan/References

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Confirmed

  • The cause of the Omega's and Isoflex Alpha
  • Doctor Gregory Nolan is doing experiments in the area of Energy Production (better, safer methods of generating electricity). He's a contemporary of Eugene, although he got funding where Eugene didn't. He builds a generator that utilizes matter/antimatter annihilation, his small-scale model works and is so efficient that they get the go-ahead to build a full-scale one. His secret is his method of generating the antimatter to begin with [and here's where we're getting into problems of "free energy" if he can just generate antimatter whenever he wants]. When he finally turns on the machine, it outputs a wave of exotic pions - atomizing him entirely in an instant. Then the machine begins operating as expected.
  • So, the deal with Nolan Generators is that every once in a while during their operation with antimatter, sometimes the particles they create are mesons - that instead of annihilating to generate power, they combine into a particle that's both matter and antimatter simultaneously (mesons, of which pions are an example, are composed of a quark-antiquark pair). They don't last long (tiny fractions of seconds), but occasionally they create "exotic mesons" which last longer (like maybe a few seconds) and are traveling at relativistic speeds and so manage to travel fairly far before decaying. Some of these, interact with the energy vortices around Ley Line connections. Some of those will result in a liquid compound being created called Isoflux Alpha. When a person is exposed to Isoflux Alpha, sometimes they'll gain powers (which is generally related to who they are and what their immediate environment is - sometimes reinforcing those traits). The amount you encounter largely just effects how quickly a reaction will occur rather than increasing odds that it will occur at all.
  • Nick and Jackson just happened to have a run-in with some jerk jocks who push them down into some mud containing Isoflux Alpha - the med-student/nurturing Nick Hernandez becomes a being of pure healing energy and the football-playing Jackson Bognetti gets bigger and tougher than he already was, but the small amount of Isoflux Alpha present meant that the change happened over the course of months. Dante Serpenta, who loves snakes, crashes into a ditch full of the stuff and comes out of it as a giant snake-man immediately. Here's where we get a new setting term - people who change after exposure to Isoflux Alpha are called "Omegas" - Dr. Medico, Mainstay, Night Snake, Quetzalcoatl, and others are Omegas (although they mostly exist in relation to the SS book as it was a tool used by the writers to explain all of the monsters and whatnot - although the backstory involving the Nolan Generator and everything was revealed gradually).
  • About the Nolan Generator - it was a thing that existed in the story for quite a while. The system creates antimatter, and that process is the secret one that Nolan didn't pass on to anybody, and so turning off the generator only stops the annihilation process. The antimatter will continue to accumulate and so, as a plot device, you can't turn off the generator given that having lots of antimatter around is a recipe for a huge explosion. As a result, it will also continue to generate Isoflux Alpha unbeknownst to anybody and therefore also continue to create Omegas.

Sources


Guise/References

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Artwork

  • The blatant reference on "Blatant Reference" is a blatant reference to the film... uh... er... hang on... it's, ah... "Pulp"... something... ah, crap.
  • The art of "Gimmicky Character" shows Guise riding a shark and embodying all thing awesome and manly. This is a double reference, or entendre, if you will, to the phrase "jumping the shark", which indicates when a series has run out of ideas, and the cover of Deadpool Killustrated #1. Please note that where Deadpool is riding a whale on that particular cover, Guise's card has him riding a shark, thus cementing his far greater levels of mojo for all eternity. [citation needed]
  • What trope could "Gritty Reboot" be referencing? Truly a mystery for the ages.
  • What trope could "Retcon" be referencing? See above.
  • "Total Beefcake". Control yourselves, ladies.
  • "Look What I Found" shows the coolest mofo ever smacking some midget alien with the "One-Shot" caption box. Please note that this is in no way a reference to the game "Marvel vs Capcom 3" and in no way pays homage to Deadpool's hyper-combo which had him smack an enemy with his super meter. Not at all. It's a completely original idea. Shut up.
  • "Where Did I Leave That..." shows Guise digging into an impossibly deep bag for something. Mondays, right? Also, this is a reference to the "hammerspace" trope.
  • The artwork of "X-Treeeeeeeeme!!!" depicts Guise with super-huge muscles and long, oddly shaped guns. These are signatures of the infamously bad comic book artist Rob Liefeld, who was inexplicably popular in the 1990's. He was also the creator of that loser Deadpool. Hah! BURN!
  • The artwork of "Uh, Yeah, I'm That Guy!" shows Guise impersonating Legacy. This is a reference to the DC character Ambush Bug, whose origin is meant to be a parody of Superman. I'm way better at being Legacy and besides my origin story is awesome so I didn't need to parody anyone.

Confirmed

  • Guise was first mentioned on Argentium as his additional effect rider. He was released as a Mini Expansion alongside the preorder event for Wrath of the Cosmos to the sound of heroic trumpet blasts and beautiful women swooning uncontrollably!
  • On the Official Forums, Christopher mentioned that Guise has been seen in art for a very very long time. It has spawned the meme of indicating that new characters in the artwork are really Guise. It has also grown to indicating certain people (Such as Ronway) is actually Guise and so on. An easy method for finding him is to ask yourself, who's the best looking person on this card?
  • On the incapacitated side of Scholar of the Infinite, we see Scholar faced with a choice of saving himself or using the philosopher's stone to save Guise, his mentee. He chooses to save Guise, and does so by pushing the philosopher's stone into Guise's body.[1] I will avenge him!
  • The Shark in "Gimmicky Character" and "Inconceivable Obstruction" in Kismet's deck are the same one as the issue Mystery Comics #292 is referenced on both cards. I'm going to count that one as jumping the shark
    • Geocaching is the best but sadly I couldn't find what I was looking for in the Ruins of Atlantis. Thankfully Kismet summoned this shark for me to get out since my breathing apparatus had broken and I needed a way to get back to the shore. Ra seemed a little shocked but I'm sure he'll be fine. Wahooooo!!!! [2] A reference for you in case you doubt me Guiseicon.png
  • From [3] we find out that the Freedom Five try not to think about Guise. That's because I'm always there in their hearts

Unconfirmed

  • No villain has ever been truly defeated without Guise's aid
  • Every game of SotM includes Guise directly or indirectly
  • If you ever lose a game of SotM playing as Guise clearly you didn't play my cards properly. I thought I told you not to make me look bad!
  • Please don't cry! Just get me some Fudge Ripple ice cream and we will get them next time
  • Someone talk to the admins about why these items are unconfirmed

To Other Works

  • Guise's ability to break the Fourth Wall makes him a kinda, sorta clear reference to some guy named Deadpool, whoever that is. Have you ever heard of him? I sure haven't.
  • Guise could also be a reference to Morph from Marvel Comics (but not the one from the X-men cartoons). Morph is a shape-shifter and often breaks the fourth wall. He's totally un-sexy though. But, c'mon, when you compare yourself to this guy...
  • According to Christopher, the inspiration for Guise was Ambush Bug[4]. Christopher is being modest, though. I was more "divinely revealed" then "inspired." Such a humble guy.
  • Guise, much like Ambush Bug, doesn't seem able to take off his costume. Besides, you know what the difference is between Ambush Bug and me? I make this look GOOD.
  • On "Where Did I Leave That...", Guise's bag is a reference to the "Subspace Suitcase", owned by Ramona Flowers in Scott Pilgrim vs The World.

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Haka/References

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Artwork

  • "Haka of Shielding" shows Ambuscade detonating a bomb (ineffectively) on Haka's back while Haka eats a sandwich and carries a balloon. This moment is foreshadowed on Ambuscades "Personal Cloaking Device" card.
  • Haka is fighting Grand Warlord Voss' Genebound Soldiers on "Punish the Weak."
  • The art on Haka's incapacitated side is a clear homage to the cover of Hulk Special #1, where Hulk holds a rocky burden on his back in a similar pose.
  • "Savage Mana" shows Haka surrounded by black feathers and the shadows of birds still overhead. This is likely a reference to The Matriarch, whose deck is much less dangerous if Haka has this in play.

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page 33 - Haka:
    • "Dominion" mentions the "land of his people", where is that? New Zealand.
    • Is his favorite food a burger? He loves them, but probably not his favorite. He likes things with a variety of complex tastes. "His favorite food is something that he hasn't tried before."
    • Are his weapons ancient and/or mystical? No. He's had his Mere for a long time, but it's not magical or anything.
    • Is he easily outwitted? No - he's very smart in general (although not super intelligent like Tachyon, he's very quick on the uptake) and while fighting in particular you're not likely to trick him as that's him in his element. He's also been around for long enough that he's very wise (maybe the wisest of their characters).
    • He seems to enjoy life, but does he get lonely/tired of life? He definitely gets lonely, but he's never tired of life. He genuinely loves his own life and he loves hearing about others' lives. He's most lonely in terms of his path in life - he knows he'll outlive most (all?) of the people he meets, but over the years he's come to terms with this. He values life more than most, if not all (it's hard to put him above Legacy), given this appreciation for the preciousness of life.
    • What are the traditions of his people that he carries? A lot of them. The Tā Moko on his face for one. The haka that he performs. His standard outfit. He sees his past as important and he's not giving it up or leaving it behind. They mention that Wikipedia is a good primer for Maori culture if you want to look into it more.
    • In your best Maori voice, can you perform all of the chants on his cards? No. Not even going to try because they couldn't do them justice. You can look up examples of people performing haka now [lots more than just the ones I linked up above before we got to this point in the podcast].
    • Roughly how old is he at the time of the card game? In the 600 range.
    • Did he have interactions with any forerunners of modern characters (e.g. previous Paul Parsons or Virtuosos of the Void)? None of the Virtuosos interacted with him (timeline would have allowed it, but it's a big world). He fought in both World Wars, but he didn't meet Paul VI or VII even though he was involved in some of the same battles. He didn't fight in an army of any particular country in these wars, but he saw a threat that warranted his attention and took part.
    • Why did the writers choose a Maori warrior as the background for a hero rather than some other culture (and does he maintain traditions of his people even though they kicked him out)? Yes on the last, as mentioned previously. The writers created him for a lot of the same reasons that Christopher and Adam did - they wanted some great big mountain of a warrior to fight stuff and they came across Maori culture in their background research and liked it. It was also something non-ubiquitous in the US culture at the time so it gave them creative space to develop the character. This is similar to using Egyptian myth in creating Ra.
    • Does Haka carry much pounamu - his mere is green, so is it made of it? Does he have other things in the traditional motifs like fish hooks? The mere is this kind of jade. In Prime War they've shown him wearing a medallion that he's had, but they haven't shown him wearing before. He's definitely got a fish hook and other pieces, but he doesn't wear them prominently much at this point because they're so old and he doesn't want to lose them.
    • In the first edition card art for "Elbow Smash" he's destroying a tank; whose is it and is this part of a bigger fight? This is something from the old Freedom Five days and he's fighting against an early Baron Blade remote-control device.
    • In which fights does he have the most and least fun? He enjoys challenging single combat the most - something that pushes his limits but doesn't involve worrying about other people around them. There was a fight with the Radioactivist that was just the two of them that stands out. Akash'Bhuta is also a good one since he can just let loose on her. He doesn't like the horde fights or ones involving civilians. The "Rampage" fight shows him as angry since there are so many people to worry about.
    • Has he ever returned to his home since being exiled? He's returned to the site of his ancestral home, but nothing's there. He hadn't returned during the lifetimes of anybody who would have actually recognized him. Good opportunities for some introspective issues, though.
    • Haka smash? No, Haka not smash. Haka speaks very good, unaccented English (or choose a language as he speaks dozens fluently) he's been around a long time and is very intelligent. This interpretation of the character is expected, but it's incorrect.
    • Why is he so adorable? It's hard to answer - why do you find him so adorable? You could also find him fearsome, or hilarious, or any number of things.
    • Are the haka text on the cards based on real haka (citing a similarity to "Haka of Battle" to one performed by the All Blacks rugby team [again, I linked to them already above])? What do they mean? Does he perform other magical haka to give him power beyond the ones we see in the game? First, they aren't magical - he performs them to boost himself up, but that's an internal process, not one granted to him by the haka. It's a method of focusing himself (and also intimidate opponents). All of the ones he performs are real haka having to do with being a Maori warrior, winning in battle, etc.
    • After his tā moko fade the first time, does he have to reapply them repeatedly as they fade again? He had to do them again once, but it was quite an undertaking (given his more robust physique at this point). He had to use snake venom (as mentioned on the flavor text of the card) to essentially "kill" a portion of his skin and then apply the pigment before it could regenerate.
    • What does "Savage Mana" represent (and why Toxic damage)? This is part of the Maori concept of mana involving defeating foes to obtain some of their power. This ties into the source of his power (that they have skipped intentionally to this point, but will get to later). When he takes the life of something, there's a bit of void (not Void) that's left and that he can draw in and store and eventually unleash on a foe as a debilitating attack. He typically uses this attack in the form of a shout or battle cry, but it's not the force of the sound itself that's doing the damage (thus not Sonic as the type), but it's this accumulated "death energy" that he's releasing, which is where the Toxic part comes in. He doesn't even really do this intentionally as he's just interpreting it as this mana concept given his cultural background.
    • What was his involvement in the Matriarch event? He was teaching near Rook City at the time (that she used to attend and is lashing out at) when a bunch of birds show up threatening the people in the area. Like in the Omnitron fight, he doesn't fight the Matriarch directly, but boy does he kill a lot of birds in order to protect the students.
    • As an immortal, how does he deal with love and loss? He does have several loves over the course of his life, but he goes into it now with the knowledge that he'll outlive them. While he was chief of his tribe he had been focused on combat and leadership and didn't allow himself a wife and so has no family from his tribe. Some of the relationships he's had over the centuries last a few years up through the other person's lifetime. Sometimes they die of old age, others it's war or sickness. He values the moment, however many of them they get together. Lovers, friends, students, fellow heroes, he outlives them and attends their funerals - he rarely speaks during them, but he'll stay afterwards until everyone leaves and sings a song for them. Continuing to experience everything connecting him to other people, including the inevitability of death and loss, is what helps him maintain his humanity.
    • Rugby or cricket? Obviously rugby. He enjoys watching cricket, but playing rugby.
    • Does he have children/descendants? Yes. No terribly recent children as he hasn't taken the time to connect with somebody in more modern times. He has other descendants that he's aware of and he's contacted them, but doesn't always tell them what his connection to them is. He wants to know about them without just making them a footnote to his story.
    • Have Haka and K.N.Y.F.E. ever attended a party and gotten into a bar brawl? They are good friends and he likes hanging out with her. He can't really get drunk anymore, though, given his powers but he humors her by keeping pace with her drinking. He likes her stories and energy. He finds a lot of her behavior self-destructive (and just generally destructive). That actually explains some of why he hangs out with her - to keep her from wrecking up the place (too much) or, if she's just got to punch somebody, maybe try to aim her at the biggest scumbag there so at least it's somebody who deserves it, and also making sure she gets home/tucks her in with some water and aspirin handy. He might be the character they've created who they'd most like to just hang out with for a weekend - he's just a great guy.
    • Has he changed world history as we would know it by heading off something major? Not really - he was involved in the world wars, but he's focused on the low-level stuff (on individuals rather than big picture). He's certainly changed stuff by being around to help people who may have otherwise died (anecdote about him working on sailing ships and, say, holding a mast together after a storm until they could make port), but it's not like he's prevented a plague or something that would have major ripple effects.
    • How does his age/wisdom impact his relationships with other heroes? Does he take a mentor role at all? He "mentors" pretty much everybody, honestly - they even mentioned this a bit all the way back in the Legacy episode that Legacy looked up to him. He's probably the Sentinel Comics "moral ideal" character. It's not like a formal mentoring relationship, though, as he's more likely to go help teach students in some underfunded school somewhere (although, he wouldn't shy away from an opportunity if it came up).
    • How does he see his teaching career? A side-gig or is it part of his overall outlook? He probably sees himself as a teacher even when he's not in a classroom. He's got knowledge that he can pass on and he feels it's a responsibility to do so.
    • What's his favorite subject to teach? Literature? "Literature" is tricky since he honestly hasn't had a lot of time to read in his travels/adventures. He likes teaching history and languages, general "social studies" kind of things. Literature doesn't really factor in until later, which they'll get to.
    • How do his students address him? He generally prefers just Aata.
    • Does he visit kids in hospitals and does he talk other heroes into going? He's not the type to wrangle others into charity work. If some kid tells him that they'd really love to meet Tachyon or something he'll say that he'll do his best to make it happen, but he's not going to force or guilt anybody into going. He might talk other heroes into going with him as a means to cheer them up about something, but phrasing it as a request to help him out. He's very insightful.
    • It's been mentioned that he'll bake small pies to bring with him to win the kids over so that they're not scared of him due to his size - what kind of pie? Is it his favorite kind or does he make a variety? He likes to bring an assortment since you don't know what people will like. He likes fruit pies, but he'll bring other kinds too.
    • Does he work with older kids too? Yeah. He subs for kids from the whole K-12 spectrum. He also works with delinquents too, trying to turn things around for them.
    • Did he bring dessert to the cookout from the picture we see a lot? Does he "backseat" cook while Legacy's manning the grill? What's his favorite food (or does he always like something new)? He definitely brought dessert (and probably sides/vegetables). He'd offer suggestions when necessary/asked, but he's not a backseat chef. "It is never 'The Haka Show'."
    • Tastes in music (mention that he likes musicals and ABBA - so does he prefer lighter/happier music)? He's got an eclectic taste given how long he's been around. Generally, he likes upbeat songs or songs that tell stories (like folk songs). He likes stuff his students made (maybe after they've grown up). He's got a soft spot for Gilbert and Sullivan stuff.
    • Does Haka like rugby? The All Blacks in particular? Does he poke fun at the Wallabies (Australia's national team) when Parse is around? Yes, definitely, and definitely. He's good at poking fun at the Wallabies without making anybody feel bad. In sports rivalries there's a certain level of poking fun that's still good-natured and he's very good at finding that line. It also helps that Parse doesn't really care about the sports.
    • Is there anything he's done in the past that was acceptable at the time that he regrets now? It's certainly happened, but they didn't really have specific examples in mind. The way he cut himself off from certain aspects of life while he was chief might qualify. There's also likely sorrow considering the people he's killed given his current outlook on the value of life.
    • Why only a substitute teacher? Do heroics interrupt his work in the classroom (like, does Fanatic ever burst into the classroom to get his help)? Does he ever scare the kids given his size and tattoos? By the nature of his existence, he's nomadic and so doesn't stay in a place for long enough to have a steady job. Also his presence also invites danger (see the Vengeance or various Ambuscade plots). Heroics interrupt a few notable times, but he takes effort to minimize them (although the Fanatic thing definitely happened). He's certainly intimidated kids. There are a lot of kids who love big strong people that they can climb all over [as a big guy who has been around friends' children, I can vouch for that], but of course there have been kids scared of him. He's good at being disarming, though (plus the whole pie thing mentioned earlier).
    • Podcast meta weirdness: The Animal Universe equivalent suggested by a listener is the quokka, a marsupial from southwestern Australia. Haka's not Australian, and they're the far side of it from New Zealand, but it's probably the closest in location/name that we're likely to get, so Christopher and Adam give him credit for this one.
    • How long has he been teaching? How did he get into it? What administrator sees somebody as big as Haka and thinks "This guy is perfect to be teaching small children"? He's got a pretty substantial record of it by this point. He was probably just around somewhere at one point that needed a teacher and he volunteered if they needed somebody, found that he loved it, and just continued when he could. His appearance only puts people off thinking he's a good fit until they talk to him for any length of time.
    • Has he had any other occupations? Work on sailing vessels as alluded to earlier. As a dock worker in Singapore (a good crossroads for meeting people from all over the world). He's never really been in charge of anything since he was chief as he's always moving on.
    • Here's an aside here about how, since the beginning of their work creating these characters, Haka has had the descriptor of "Savage" attached to him. This is an intentionally ironic misnomer as he's literally the least savage character they have. It's indicative of the first reaction that many people have upon seeing him for the first time, though. After you talk to him, you realize that "The Enlightened Haka" might be a better title.
    • Given the Eternal Haka card art, he seems to enjoy books; what other books does he enjoy or has he recommended to his fellow heroes? Has he done any promotional work to encourage young readers? He's not really a reader up through the end of the card game era as he's just too busy. The Final Wasteland version of Haka is mostly due to the fact that he's been alone for so long that all he has are the books and the time to read them. So many of them are by or about people that he knew. He likes just about everything, but the guys pick out poetry in particular ("condensed humanity") and he's not so much reading to learn, but to recall and preserve. Putting Haka alone in the Final Wasteland is probably one of the meanest things the guys did to a character.
    • What happened to Eternal Haka? Does he go back in time or just fight with heroes to wind up in the Final Wasteland? Is he involved in the OblivAeon arc? He fights along heroes in the Final Wasteland and he does manage to come back to get involved in the OblivAeon event, but he goes back. He's a different guy anyway - not just because of how most time-travel/multiverse stuff works in this setting, but because he's spent so many centuries alone that he's just different from the Haka we know.
    • Is Eternal Haka an Endling or would the Terminarch pick somebody else given his weirdness? He is, by definition as the Last Human, an Endling. Jansa vi Dero would have approached him to make the offer, but he turned her down to stay and retain his connection to humanity. If he was capable of knowing all outcomes of his decisions, he'd likely come to regret this choice because if he'd gone he at least would have other beings to interact with.
    • Does he actually die and come back from death? Haka is unkillable - he has never actually fully died.
    • How do his powers/resurrection work? Does he die and slowly regenerate over days or is it more immediate? Are there limits (would decapitation or vaporization kill him for good or would he just appear again later)? Does his strength increase each time he's defeated? So, there will be some "how" and "why" of some of this in a later episode, but here's the "what". As a result of OblivAeon, there's an entity that sees that a champion is necessary, somebody who can go toe-to-toe with these threats. "Our" Haka and an alternate reality version of Haka are bound together across space-time at the cost of all other versions of him. There are a lot of alternate versions of this person, but after this event there are only two who each have the strength, vitality, life, etc. of all of the rest. This is what gives him his heroic attributes, but the other one he's still linked to is why he's unkillable - as long as one is alive the other cannot die (taking both out simultaneously is the only way to get rid of him - generally not a worry since they're in different universes). Then OblivAeon starts blurring those lines and they both wind up in the same battles. They don't know how any of this works (but somebody does - more later in that person's story). You could not decapitate him or vaporize him as his link to the other would prevent his death. Iron Legacy just had to encase him in a block of something durable and drop him into the ocean to keep him out of his way, but that didn't kill him. His strength isn't going up based on deaths, it's just going up over time as he absorbs more life energy from the other realities' versions of him. Eternal Haka has been around so long that he can't even really be knocked out anymore (his incap art doesn't show him beaten physically, just by circumstance). The "only 2 versions of him" thing is weird as it happens over time - they talk about these different versions of him, but we see them before they get erased by these time shenanigans, and then more realities branch off due to events as normal, but eventually those versions' Hakas will get erased too.
    • Who is Arataki Wakawarewa? That's Haka.

Sources


Harpy/References

Edit this Reference

Artwork

  • Compared to other villains, The Matriarch has made the fewest appearances in the card art of other decks. Outside of her own deck, she has only appeared on Parse's "Reveal the Flaws" and the Celestial Tribunal's "Character Witness." Notably, she is never seen fighting the heroes, though some are seen being attacked by birds which could have been under her control.
  • "Darken the Sky" had a digital error on its original printing, giving the picture and flavor text-bubble a pixelated look. The Rook City / Infernal Relics reprint box corrected this flaw.

Confirmed

  • The Matriarch is one of the only characters to receive an overhaul of their deck in future printings. During the Infernal Relics/Rook City combo set, The Matriarch's Fowl Cards had their 'Play another Fowl' kicker text moved to the Matriarchs character card, changing the interaction with some Heroes ability to kill the fowls before that card text activated.
  • There will never be a hero named "The Matriarch". * However, Christopher has said that there will be other villains that turn into hero decks, so she may receive a name change. Christopher on the Forums
  • The Mask of the Matriarch was previously owned by a powerful magic user of some type. When Lillian put it on, some of the personality of the previous magic user overtook her own personality. Gen Con 2016 Q&A
  • Lillian is naturally magically sensitive, which is why she got attuned to the Mask. As the Matriarch, she is not really in control. As The Harpy and Pinion, she has more control. Gen Con 2016 Q&A

Unconfirmed

To Other Works

  • The Matriarch's cohorts, Huginn and Muninn, are named after the mythological ravens that served Odin, the Norse father god. Their names mean "thought" and "memory" respectively. However, the Norse Gods are NOT represented in The Multiverse >G Forum Post
  • Most of the scenes depicted on the Matriarch's cards are references to the film The Birds by Alfred Hitchcock.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page 15
      • First question has a long lead-in about how cool it was to meet them at Gen Con last year and that she (variaknight) was the one in Matriarch cosplay. I include this because the guys talk about how much they love seeing Sentinels Cosplay. This is right around 38:00 in the podcast.
      • The Mask was owned previously owned by a powerful magic user and their personality rubbed off on it. Does that personality override Lillian's when she wears it/is it more responsible for the villainous acts or is it more Lillian? Who was the previous owner and was this intentional? The Mask is an ancient item that creates an automatic attunement to birds and grants an ability to control them. There's a side-character in Sentinel Comics who doesn't really show up in the card game, but is still a player in the setting - Ignazio Gallo, an Italian mage who likes playing around with magical artifacts. He doesn't create them, but he likes chaos and "messing with things" and so generally puts some kind of curse or downside on the artifacts he comes across. In the 1920s he found a lighter that didn't need fuel - he added a bug so that on every thousandth use it would burst into a giant flame (this is the cause of the Great Fire of Santander, Spain in 1941 that burned down most of the city). There was a necklace with a blue jewel that would ensure the safe arrival of any sea voyage when a passenger was wearing it - until he made it so that the thousandth vessel would sink. He altered the mask so that after it was used to control the thousandth bird, they would turn on the wearer and tear them to pieces. It's not so much his personality as just an incitement for chaos - the lighter, after he messed with it, would cause the person to want to burn things. The Mask pushes the person to use them more chaotically.
      • Is Nightmist training her to be another paranormal investigator? Is there a lot of poring over the Tome of Elder Magic or more of a "learning to control wild magic" situation? Not really aiming at "paranormal investigator", more just needing "good" magicians. Nightmist herself isn't really an "investigator" by this point in her story - she has premonitions that something big is coming and they'll need all of the magical help they can get.
      • Dark Watch Harpy's incapacitated art looks similar to the room on Nightmist's "Master of Magic" card; are they the same room? What's the significance? That's Nightmist's home/magical study in both cards. Good "magical" place (not as good as a swamp, though).
      • How do the rest of Dark Watch react to Nightmist bringing in a former villain? This would have been more of a problem with the Freedom Five or even the Prime Wardens - members of Dark Watch already had questionable pasts, Expatriette was pretty much a straight up murderer before becoming a hero. Setback didn't really have a bad history, but is the most accepting of people and giving second chances. Mr. Fixer recognizes "who you are, not who you were", but has his own darkness going on by this point anyway to worry about.
      • Matriarch doesn't appear on many cards outside of her own deck, and Tachyon's the only hero who appears in her deck - does she almost never attack the heroes? As mentioned earlier, the Matriarch is only a villain once. This is why it's easier for heroes to accept her later - years have passed and she did her time (or a good chunk of it). She kind of breaks the mold of villains in the card game who, for the most part, are major villains. She's more of a major character and her villainous act was a big part of her overall arc and they wanted to show that in the game.
      • What's the relationship like between her and Tachyon throughout the story? Is Tachyon proud of her once she chooses the heroic path? Still wary of the change? They ever meet up for family time? Meredith and Lillian weren't particularly close even before getting powers - the age difference made it difficult (almost more of an aunt/niece dynamic than cousins). Major parts of this relationship were shown in the visits that Tachyon made to her in prison. Starts with (continued) resentment towards her super-successful cousin, softening over the years and by the time she's the Harpy, Tachyon is proud of her for turning her life around.
      • Her group affiliation as a villain is listed as the Undead Poets Society - who were the others? Did they also feel a pull to artifacts? That was a joke for Adam and Christopher. These were just her circle of high school friends who met in coffee shop to tell their bad poetry to one another. They're not a "villain group" like the Citizens of the Sun or anything.
      • When did they know that Lillian was destined to make the villain-to-hero transition? Was it always planned or did they create the character as one and only later decided to add the change? She was always intended to become a hero, but how/when that happened wasn't in place at first. All of the new OblivAeon heroes who used to be villains had that capacity built into their stories. Of that set, she's the one who's a hero for the longest.
      • Are the birds real birds or magical birds created by the Mask? Real birds. If it makes you feel better, there's a serious crow problem in Rook City.
      • How did Tachyon feel about her redemption? No longer any real animosity, but originally very concerned after the prison break - relieved that she wasn't going bad again. They don't really hang out as they still run in different circles.
      • Does she get over her goth phase or is she still melodramatic? She's still somewhat melodramatic, but is largely over the goth phase as an affectation (with the whole "magic" thing it makes a bit more sense). As a side note, the guys have apparently never discussed if her hair is naturally that way or not. Christopher always assumed that she had black hair and when she first put on the mask all of it turned white except for that one lock - Adam accepts this explanation. They didn't think that she dyed it that way.
      • Most of the birds in her deck are corvids, but then there's vultures. Are the corvids just her personal preferences (see her last name and general goth aesthetic choices), easier to use because of their innate intelligence, or somehow more in tune with the Mask's power? She, personally, has a bit more of an affinity to crows and whatnot, but it's also that they're clever and "grimdark" - the vultures fit into this latter part. She can control birds in general, but Rook City has a lot of these types of birds on hand already. As Pinion she uses a hawk and owl.
      • What are Huginn and Muninn? Just particularly large and smart birds? Familiars tied to the Mask? Actually Odin's ravens? They're just particularly large and smart birds - she kind of forms a particular bond with them, though (mention of them as related to her Hero deck, the RPG, and the two sides of her power - avian vs. arcane).

Sources


Hayes Brothers/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Often in Westerns you'll have sets of brothers working together as Outlaws or Lawmen. The Hayes brothers would reflect that and are setup that they can't directly attack each other.

Sources


Headlong/References

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Confirmed

  • Brandon Bradley doesn't appear in the Mist Storm Universe.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • From Podcast Episode 74
  • Is Headlong a cyborg or just in a super suit of some sort (or are the blue lines just an aesthetic thing)? The suit doesn't do anything for him. The blue lines are made to glow when he's using his powers as an aesthetic element. The power is all him (because he got accidentally cursed by something he picked up).

Sources


Heartbreaker/References

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Confirmed

  • Heartbreaker has been confirmed to be Tony Taurus Christopher AMA.
  • Heartbreaker makes his appearance during the Vengeance events with a sneak attack on Mr. Fixer while Dark Watch was busy fighting a group of Proletariat clones. He was hired by The Chairman to kill Mr. Fixer as he was still seen as a danger to The Organization. (Letters Page 10)
  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • What exactly happened to turn Tony Taurus into Heartbreaker? Was the events in the Bloodsworn Colosseum part of this? He was a cop in Rook City until he realized the level of corruption there - not so much a single event, but the years and years of futile police work just got to him, and so he quit to become a private investigator (his Rook City card appearance). This didn't stop his interactions with the worst in people, though, since he's still in Rook City. Then the Bloodsworn Colosseum shows up and he's stuck in there for a while and forced to fight. He survives, but he's lost a lot of his morality in the process. He's just a broken man by now and eventually becomes Heartbreaker - just a remorseless murderer. People are terrible and deserve to die and nothing means anything anyway, may as well make some money off of it in the meantime. It's a sad story as he was genuinely interested in helping people at the beginning, but now he's been broken in as much a way as it's possible for a person to break.

Sources


Hermetic/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • Is Hermetic an ancient alchemist kept alive by his own (red) philosopher's stone or is he just into steampunk? Any other philosopher's stones out there? Is he important somehow ("Do you know who I am?")? He *is* an ancient alchemist kept alive by his alchemy, but the red stone isn't keeping *anybody* alive. It's a blood stone (about the opposite of a philosopher's stone). His "cures" are for mortality - he's trying to cure life itself. He shouts the "do you know who I am?" stuff due to his inflated sense of importance, not because he's nobility or anything. He's been around for a long time, but doesn't do anything really notable (until he does...).

To Other Works

  • The Alchemy table on his card, and many of the herbs in it, are from Skyrim
  • Hermetic is holding a large, glowing red rock and is standing in front of vials filled with red liquid. In keeping with the visual themes of his nemesis the Scholar, we can assume that these are references to the alchemic red liquids and false philosopher stones that acted as McGuffins in the anime “Fullmetal Alchemist.” It seems that Hermetic is employing similar methods to create his own version of the mystic stone his nemesis possesses.
    • The Letters Page Interlude 7 determined this is not a philosophers stone, but a Blood Stone, possibly similar to what Bugbear has.

Sources


Highbrow/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Episode 20 - Chokepoint
    • Absolute Zero fights Highbrow during the TermiNation event- she's creepy; she has a giant brain and she has to stay in a special chair because of it (well, she had to stay in the chair until her brain was removed and put in a jar that hovers around her with a cable leading to her spine). She doesn't have any psychic powers or anything, she's just really really smart.
  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • Why is Highbrow Parse's nemesis (so far we've heard about her in relation to Setback and Kismet)? Why is she not more of a major villain given her intellect? She doesn't lack the drive, intellect, or anything to be a major villain - she's just fairly new. She's Parse's nemesis because she's largely introduced as a intellectual threat and the two of them match wits during Vengeance.

To Other Works

  • Highbrow bears a strong resemblance to both members of the Brain Trust, a villainous psychic duo who first appeared in the second issue of DC’s “Kingdom Come” miniseries.
  • Highbrow may also be a gender-flipped variant of The Leader, the high-foreheaded nemesis of the Incredible Hulk. The weapon she is shown holding on The Sentinels' card "Blackout" seems reminiscent of the Leader's odd-looking inventions.

Sources


Hippocalypse/References

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Confirmed

  • The Hippo used to play for Rook City's professional baseball team, the Rook City Renegades (Letters Page 10).
  • Hippo is probably their most insecure character - a dorky kid named Edward Wagner (surname pronounced the German way, like the Mars Base - he's part of the same family - his great aunt was some bigshot scientist) who now goes by Eddie Wagner (pronounced the Americanized way where the first syllable is the same as the word "wag") because he was picked on for his name as a kid. He geeked out on animals, specifically, and always wanted to go to the zoo. Once, when viewing the hippos and commenting on how cute they were he was informed by a person that actually they're very dangerous (one of the most dangerous in Africa). He internalized this knowledge of "hippos = vicious, dangerous animals". Years pass and he becomes a professional baseball player (a member of the Rook City Renegades, a team known for their thuggish behavior as they're all felons) - a relief outfielder and isn't particularly good. They're sponsored by Pike Industries, though, and part of the training involves the corporate water bottle, supplements, and steroids. They encourage not taking too many to not be too obvious about it, but he winds up taking all of them to give him an edge. This makes him very obviously on something and so he's caught pretty much immediately and is kicked out. The Organization scoops him up as hired muscle as an occasional enforcer (although he does his own jobs too). He wants more steroids to keep his edge in his new profession too, and the yardstick he uses to measure his own strength is Haka. He's not specifically out to punch Haka like Ambuscade might, but one of these days, if he gets strong enough, he'll be able to beat him in one of the occasional fights they wind up in (he doesn't). (Letters Page Interlude 7

To Other Works

  • As a large, burly villain who dresses like a large, burly animal, the Hippo is a clear homage to the Rhino, a Spider-Man villain.

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Idealist/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Ignazio Gallo/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Inductor/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Infinitor/References

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Artwork

  • Infinitor’s “Unstable Despoiler” side shows him wrapping himself up in a straight-jacket construct. This seems to imply that he still maintains some vestige of sanity and is trying to stop himself. The art on “Whispers to Oblivion,” which shows Infinitor clutching his head in pain as Captain Cosmic, his brother, consoles him, adds to this contention.

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • As a villain who creates monstrous energy constructs to destroy his foes, Infinitor is very similar to the DC villain Sinestro. As a madman with cosmic powers, he is similar to Superboy Prime.
  • The energy which fuels Captain Cosmic’s powers is yellow, while the respective energy of his arch enemy, Infinitor, is green. This is a reversal of the color schemes of the heroic Green Lantern and the evil Sinestro, the latter of whom wields the yellow light of fear.
  • Infinitor’s mask is very similar to Doctor Doom’s. Additionally, both characters garb themselves in green.

Sources


Insula Primalis/References

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Artwork

  • The Card art of Pterodactyl Thief shows it stealing Expatriettes RPG Launcher. On her card, RPG Launcher, she is seen riding the Pterodactyl to attack the T-Rex

Confirmed

  • The flavor text of "Enraged T-Rex" indicates that Insula Primalis has a citizenry - As this is the place where Citizen Dawn discovered in her bio, this makes sense.

To Other Works

  • The "clever girl" quote on the Velociraptor Pack's flavor text is a reference to the movie Jurassic Park (1993), where the character Muldoon gets attacked by Raptors (See this video clip)
  • Insula Primalis is a clear homage to the dinosaur filled Savage Land of Marvel lore. It may also be a reference to the numerous dinosaur isles that showed up in silver age DC comics.

Sources


Iron Curtain/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Isis/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Judge Mental/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • Is Judge Mental an actual judge? What kind of court? What kinds of truths is he interested in (tied to the Idealist?)? First off, you need to go to 23:15 or so to hear Christopher's proper pronunciation of his name. He's not an actual judge (he was a barrister in the UK at one point and wanted to be a judge, but instead became Judge Mental). He wants to "expose truths" by "implanting truths" - he has a power of suggestion and he wants people to believe the truths that he desires. He's important in Captain Cosmic's story - so get some questions in for that episode.

To Other Works

  • His name is a play on words as together it sounds like judgmental.

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

K.N.Y.F.E./References

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Artwork

  • "For the Greater Good" depicts Knyfe stabbing the villain Choke. This would be a key event in Choke's ascension into Chokepoint.
  • Knyfe is found combating villains in several of her cards. Proletariat on "Amplified Combatant", Fright Train on "Wrecking Uppercut", Major Flay on "Kinetic Neutralizer", a Celestial Executioner from The Celestial Tribunal on "Energy Burn", and Choke/Chokepoint on "For the Greater Good".
  • Knyfe's incapacitated art shows Citizen Dawn turning Knyfe's internal light against her, as was mentioned in Letters Page Episode 5 as an example of a hero who would not be able to take on Dawn one-on-one.

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Knyfe’s military background and penchant for violence were popular tropes in 90’s comics.
  • Knyfe’s powers, attire, and the intentional misspelling of her name are tropes shared by many popular 90’s comic book characters. The power to manipulate nondescript energy was very common with 90’s superheroes, most notably ones from the now defunct Malibu Publications. Intentionally misspelled names were infamously prevalent at the time thanks to their overuse in the then-popular Image Comics; examples include, but are not limited to:
    • Dreadlox (Marvel)
    • Byrd (Image Comics)
    • Bloodwynd (DC)
  • Knyfe's powers in general are similar to those of Marvel's Psyloche.
  • The green, pointed eared enemy that Knyfe is fighting on “Energy Burn” is the Celestial Executioner, one of the AI's of the Celestial Tribunal.
  • The red-garbed ninjas on “Flawless Execution” somewhat resemble ninjas of The Hand, an evil organization in the Marvel Universe.
  • The scene pictured on “Infiltrate and Obfuscate” is a reference to a similar scene in the film “Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope.”
  • The surface that Knyfe is standing upon on “Primed Punch” has circle and line designs indicative of comic artist Jack Kirby.
  • The poses of Knyfe and Major Flay on "Kinetic Neutralizer" are a reference to the cover of X-Men #5 which depicts Wolverine fighting Omega Red in similar poses.
  • Knyfe's incapacitated side may be a reference to Marvel's X-Men #25 from 1993, which was itself the fourth entry of the six-part Fatal Attractions crossover. The climax of the issue was a full-page spread depicting the villain Magneto ripping away the adamantium coating from a still-living Wolverine's skeleton. Citizen Dawn and Knyfe are posed like Magneto and Wolverine respectively, with Dawn's light powers taking the place of the adamantium tendrils bursting from Wolverine's skin.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page 21 - K.N.Y.F.E.
    • Progeny fought pretty much everyone, so why is it K.N.Y.F.E. the nemesis? This is a pairing more on K.N.Y.F.E.'s end than on Progeny's. Her story involves it heavily (it's why she left F.I.L.T.E.R., it's why she went into space, her intel is what allowed the body count to be relatively low in Megalopolis, etc.). Fighting space monsters is right in her wheelhouse.
    • Based on the Block's interdimensionality, is our Paige Huntly originally from the main universe/timeline? No. She's from a very similar one, though. The observational mission she was on when she saw Progeny defeat a team of heroes was her timeline.
    • Has she encountered different versions of the heroes out in the multiverse? Yeah, Tempest from her timeline was already mentioned (along with the rest of that team who died) for example.
    • What was the purpose of her F.I.L.T.E.R. spec ops team? Did she work with Sgt. Steel? She mostly fought alien monsters but did fight with Steel on occasion, too, but not regularly.
    • Considering F.I.L.T.E.R. doesn't seem to have an issue with locking up powered individuals, why did they have problems with the information that she brought to them (regarding Progeny)? There's some sinister stuff going on above her pay grade that will get addressed in next week's episode.
    • Was the anomaly that she found Progeny or it just a part of what she discovered that led to her leaving? It was part of a whole.
    • What shape was she in after the Progeny fight? Not as bad as most heroes - "she gave worse than she got".
    • Were there attempts by Sgt. Steel to bring her back before or after Progeny? After, as mentioned.
    • Is there only one Block? Yes.
    • What all happened in Out of Time - is this her whole backstory? This is her backstory, it starts with her gaining powers and ends with her leaving F.I.L.T.E.R. - she becomes a "rogue agent" here, but this isn't where her Rogue Agent variant shows up.
    • The flavor text on the OoT quotes are more coherent than on her other cards, writers having trouble with her accent and/or how thick to make it? Her accent fluctuates based on writers/which book she's in. Since OoT required a lot of storytelling from her point of view (and if she's the main character in other books) they dial it back. Canonically she has a particularly thick Scottish accent (they even note that they're aware that there are a variety of Scottish accents - although they don't mention a specific one for her).
    • What's the deal with her nemesis icon? It's a torn F.I.L.T.E.R. emblem.
    • What's her personal view on aliens? How about people like Captain Cosmic who got their powers from cosmic sources? Robots? Magic users? Initially, when fighting mindless monster beasts she was on-board. Once she starts running into sapient aliens (like Tempest) she reevaluates. She's still wary of non-human entities, but she also spends a lot of time as a space-based hero (as the only human) and this is all part of her character arc.
    • Does K.N.Y.F.E.'s clan/family factor in at all? She's a member of Clan Gordon and no other heroes are, but there is one member who's important to the world of Sentinels [they don't specify who - maybe either Adam or Christopher themselves?].
    • What's the story with her tattoo? Does she keep in touch with her old military contacts? The tattoo is the Clan Gordon emblem. She doesn't have any ties with her old military people - it's been a long time and it's in a different reality.
    • Is she seeing anyone? She's single and not really looking for a relationship, but is open to the occasional dalliance. She'd likely bristle under the idea of a commitment.

Sources


Kaargra Warfang/References

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Artwork

  • Soulslayer Perith’s design, attire, and mannerisms may be a reference to the popular Adultswim.com game “Lesbian Spider Queen of Mars.”
  • S’Sdari the Bloody is designed around the popular “steampunk” motif.
  • The man depicted on “Title: ‘Stonejaw’” is Rook City detective Tony Taurus.
  • The suit of armor Haka is wearing on “Title: ‘The Unbreakable’” is identical to the one worn by the Hulk in the “Planet Hulk” miniseries.

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Kaagra’s powers, motivation, personality, and the brutal Colosseum games she sponsors are all evocative of the DC villain Mongol, specifically the version which debuted in the 2001 Justice League cartoon series. She can also be compared to the Red King of the 2006 Marvel mini-series “Planet Hulk,” who also had similar characteristics.
  • As a cyclopean parasite which takes control of its victim’s minds, Orim Hiveminded is similar to the DC villain Starro the Star-Conqueror.

Sources


Katie Vance/References

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Confirmed

  • Main supporting cast member for Bunker was his sister Katie who served the purpose of exposition; a lot of the storytelling conceit was in the form of excerpts from letters back and forth between them that would be overlaid on the action.

Sources


Kismet/References

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Artwork

  • Her nemesis symbol was first seen on the chest of a character on the Shock Rounds card from Expatriette. Before his name was known, the forum refereed to him as 'Twitchy', due to the flavor text of the card. He is Setback
  • Her cards "Imminent Destruction" and "Inconceivable Obstruction" (featuring Visionary and Ra, respectively) show events from the confrontation between Kismet and the heroes in the Ruins of Atlantis, following her first escape from the Block. "Lady Luck" and "Scattered Mind" have cited issues for their flavor text in the same run of issues, but the art doesn't place it necessarily in the same place.
  • "Violent Trickster" shows Kismet punching Setback with a roulette wheel, dice, and playing cards as accompanying imagery. This could place it during their first confrontation as adults, during a casino heist also involving The Hippo (and planned by Highbrow).
  • The shark in "Inconceivable Obstruction" is the same shark Guise is riding in his card "Gimmicky Character".

Confirmed

  • The artwork for Unstable Kismet shows the environment Madame Mittermeier’s Fantastical Festival of Conundrums & Curiosities in the background

To Other Works

  • Kismet was the submission of Alex Franklin during the Create a Villain contest. This submission won first place and was revealed as a new villain during the Shattered Timelines kickstarter campaign on November 20, 2012.
  • Kismet is a word, derived from Arabic, Sanskrit, Urdu or Hindi, meaning fate or destiny, a predetermined course of events. - wikipedia reference
  • "If people are curious, her family's last name 'Adhin' is a corruption of 'ádh,' which is Irish Gaelic for luck/fortune. Her (original) first name is the female equivalent of a good friend of mine's name." - Alex Franklin via the Official SotM Forums
  • As a probability manipulator, Kismet is most similar to the Marvel characters Domino and Scarlet Witch.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page Episode 7:
      • Why is she a criminal given what we know of her power (game bio/what we see in the cards) - why not just win the lottery etc.? The backlash effect mentioned - if she uses her power to win the lottery directly, something bad will happen to negate it.
      • Setback/Kismet dichotomy seems to be a passive/active one - Pete accepts things as they happen, Gabrielle cheating fate when she can get away with it, is that accurate for their rivalry? Kind of. They don't really have a rivalry. They've crossed paths a few times and he just sees her as somebody from his past, while she hates him. It's kind of a confirmation bias thing for her - he's only really done 2 things to her, but she feels that he ruined her life.
      • What's the deal with the shark? [this is a pretty funny question at around 51:00] Shark is coming up through the floor in Atlantis. Ra had Kismet cornered and dead-to-rights, but then the shark bursts in to distract him. We find out that Ra, Visionary, and Haka (and others) were there to fight her. Guise just happened to be in the Ruins of Atlantis doing some geocaching and needed a way to get back up to the surface, so he rides the shark back up.
      • How do you get rid of Jinxes? Does she know about the curse on Setback? Could she remove it? Jinxes largely wear off automatically (and have good things happen to them in the meantime), although some heroes could do something about it themselves (e.g. Visionary). The curse is something else and is much more powerful and permanently a part of him. She's not aware of that, though. She might be able to do so, but only if she put enough power and effort into it as her teenage angst did to create it. She'd probably want to if she knew about it, if only to keep it from thwarting her later but also to study it to see how she could use it.
      • What does the Scholar think of her? He's tricky as an omnipresent figure who shows up to help lots of people, but then just goes away again. He's part of so many character's stories, while always pretty much being the same. Other characters grow or change over the years, but he's always himself. He doesn't really have any interactions with Kismet, though, in the primary continuity. He probably would put a lot of effort into changing her if he met her, though. Stay tuned for the Scholar episode in a long time.
      • She can see threads of fate and causality - does she see OblivAeon coming? More power talk: yeah she feel the strands of fate and can push on them, but it's not really "seeing" the future of reality. It's more of a feeling that "if I push here, something good will happen" more than seeing the nature of what the good thing would be. Since she's not really seeing the future, she has no way of seeing OblivAeon coming. She has some inklings of something bad approaching, but not what it is.
      • Unstable Kismet seems to have ties to Madame Mittermeier's Fantastical Festival of Conundrums & Curiosities, does that imply relationship with Glamour and Cueball? Yes, they're people she's worked with before and called up for her "hero side-show" plot. There's also been a Baron Blade event that happened there and some Argent Adept stuff, but Kismet is the "main" event for the location.
      • What's the deal with her tattoo? Started out relatively small on her shoulder- got it the first time she used her power and didn't see the repercussion. She adds to it on similar occasions, memorializing major events (for her, we don't see all of them in the comics) where she used her power without experiencing the backlash.
      • Which other villains has she interacted with the most? Has Dawn tried to recruit her? Most is probably members of the Slaughterhouse Six (separately before they teamed up). Dawn wouldn't have bothered - too much liability being around her.
      • Has she tried dating since she and Pete broke up? Yeah, it's been years. On-again, off-again thing with Re-Volt. Nothing notable story-wise.
      • Curse repeatable? Already covered, she doesn't have enough knowledge about how her power works to repeat it as well as the need for some big upwelling of power/emotion to get it going in the first place.
      • Did she do anything interesting during OblivAeon? Very much so. In the Block when it starts, sees stuff is going down (and the Block is in a precarious situation in the first place given the crashing realities). She escapes into the "card game timeline" and she seals the portal to the Block behind her - more in the Future section.
      • "Unstable" variant named for her power or her personality? Yes. Power backlashes are unpredictable and personality has never really been particularly stable, but a lot of time in the Block hasn't helped. She never really got out of the teenage temper tantrum level of growing up.
      • Repercussions of her being a fan-created character on the setting? They liked the probability shifting aspect - they hadn't really planned to have somebody filling that role. Setback was waiting in the wings already and it made sense to combine their stories. They shied away from "probability" powers due to the nature of a card game, but they liked how Alex approached it/worded how her effects played out, needing to be "outwardly focused".

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

La Comodora/References

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Artwork

  • The art of "Raiding Party" portrays the crew of La Paradoja Magnifica attacking the Freedom Five headquarters, hinting that the ship can somehow travel over land.
  • In "Temporal Thief," La Capitan has Legacy's ring, Tachyon's goggles, and the Wraith's Impromptu Invention.
  • The weapon that Chip is holding in "Plunder" is Absolution, Fanatic's sword.

Confirmed

  • La Paradoja Magnifica is Spanish for "the Magnificent Paradox."

Unconfirmed

  • All of La Capitan's crew, with the possible exception of "Final Breath," are armed with anachronistic weaponry and equipment. (though that could be a laser pistol in La Capitan's hand)

Sources


Legacy/References

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Artwork

  • Most of Iron Legacy's cards are thematic inversions of Legacy's:
    • "Final Evolution" - "Next Evolution."
    • "Superhuman Redirection" - "Superhuman Durability."
    • "Armored Fortitude" - "Fortitude."
    • "Rule From the Front" - "Lead From the Front"
    • "Iron Fist Strike" - "Back Fist Strike."
    • "Beat Down" - "Take Down."
    • "Former Allies" - "Bolster Allies."
    • "Flying Assault" - "Flying Smash."
    • "Demoralizing Presence" - "Inspiring Presence."
  • The scene pictured on "Galvanized" is mentioned in Iron Legacy's character profile.
  • Legacy is locked in combat with the Proletariat on "Lead From the Front."
  • The man that Legacy is punching on "Motivational Charge" is Citizen Anvil.
  • The Bizarro Reference on "Thokk!" is likely Dark Hero out of The Dreamer's deck
  • The scenes on the Incapacitated side of both versions of America's Greatest Legacy's character card show the death of the hero at the hands of Baron Blade. This was the villain's first major comics appearance.

Confirmed

  • In the main timeline of SOTM, Legacy is eventually killed by Baron Blade, after which Young Legacy assumes his role as a member of the Freedom Five. In an alternate timeline, Young Legacy dies instead, prompting Legacy to become Iron Legacy.
  • Counting "Young Legacy", there have been four Legacies. Current (America's Finest) Legacy, his daughter (America's Newest), his father (America's Greatest), and his grandfather, who was the first Parsons to take up the Legacy mantle. * Please note that these are not the only Parsons family members to have superpowers; they are simply the first ones to use the "Legacy" moniker.
  • Iron Legacy has the lowest HP of any solitary villain who can be defeated by dealing damage to him. (Despite this, he is generally not what you could call an easy fight.)
  • Iron Legacy is the nemesis of all the Freedom Five...except Legacy. (More specifically, he is the nemesis of the Freedom Six, an alternate-future version of the team in which Legacy has, obviously, left the team or been expelled from it, with Tempest replacing him and Unity upgraded from an intern to a full member.)
  • Powers for various Legacy family members per Letters Page for Legacy The Letter Page Episode 1 (Thanks to WalkingTarget who wrote this up)
    • Joseph Parsons - Revolutionary War - Danger Sense
    • Paul Parsons I - War of 1812 - Exceptional Athletic Condition
    • Paul Parsons II ("Lucky Paul Parsons") - No war/conflict - Super Speed (not Tachyon-level, but capable of moving noticeably faster than he should be able to)
    • Paul Parsons III - Mexican–American War - Super Strength
    • Paul Parsons IV - Civil War - Single Attack Negation (like, taking a cannonball to the chest, but has a recovery/recharge time before he can use it again)
    • Paul Parsons V (family moved to Chicago) - Spanish–American War - Vitality ("especially robust", recover from disease faster, age slower, hold breath for 10s of minutes, etc.)
    • Paul Parsons VI (first to go by the Legacy name) - World War I - Flight
    • Paul Parsons VII (America's Greatest Legacy, "Grandpa" Legacy) - World War II and Korean Conflict - Keen Eyesight
    • Paul Parsons VIII (America's Finest Legacy, founder of the Freedom Four/Five) - No wartime service (too young for Vietnam), certainly major conflicts as a Superhero - Bulletproof Skin (better against many small wounds as opposed to the Single Attack Negation they already had)
    • Pauline Felicia Parsons (America's Newest Legacy, Beacon in the Tactics timeline) - No wartime service - Laser Eyes/"Atomic Glare"
  • Mr. Fixer was originally a Blaxploitation character created in the '60s called Black Fist. He typically showed up as the "B" story in the back pages of Legacy's main comic book, Justice Comics, but they rarely interacted with one another.
  • Paul Parsons VIII and Pauline both have no siblings, but that's not true for previous generations. In such cases, only the first born of every generation gets the powers. Some of the non-powered siblings would be jealous, but it was more common for them to be relieved that they didn't have the responsibilities that came with the gift (Letters Page Interlude 3).

To Other Works

  • Paul Parsons' (Legacy's alter-ego) name is alliterative, i.e. his first and last name both begin with the same letter. Alliteration was a common device in the early Superman comics, most notably with the characters of Lois Lane, Lana Lang, and Lex Luthor. Clark Kent, the alter ego of Superman, did not technically share in this pattern, though his first and last names both started with a hard c/k sound. Peter Parker, the alter-ego of Spider-Man, also shares in this tradition; fittingly, Legacy borrows his danger sense from Peter Parker's spider-sense.
  • It should be noted that Paulina Parsons, Legacy's daughter, and Baron Blade, his nemesis, both follow the alliterative naming pattern.
    • Stan Lee has said that the reason he used alliterative names for so many early Marvel superheroes (e.g., Peter Parker, Reed Richards, Bruce Banner, Susan Storm, Matt Murdock) was because they made it easier for him to remember. (I've seen this in a video interview, probably attached to one of the X-Men or Sam Raimi Spider-Man films.)
  • The sunrise-sillhouted group shot on "Bolster Allies" may be a reference to the opening title animation of the "Justice League" animated series.
  • Legacy is fighting a doppleganger of himself with an inverted color scheme on "Thokk!" This is a reference to Bizarro, the backwards duplicate of Superman.
  • Legacy's "Danger Sense" is a clear homage to Spider-Man's "spider-sense." The "sense lines" that emerge from Legacy's head on the card are identical to the ones that emerge from Spider-Man's head when he senses danger.
  • Legacy's costume, powers, and demeanor are all clear references to Superman, the DC Comics superhero that started the superhero genre.
  • Appropriately enough, Legacy is the founding member of the Freedom Five much in the same way that Superman is the founder of the Justice League.
  • The lasers that Paulina Parsons is shooting from her eyes on "Next Evolution" are similar to those used by Superman.
  • The art on Greatest Legacy's incapacitated side appears to be an homage to this picture of Captain America when he was shot to "death" during Marvel's Civil War storyline.
  • As a corrupted, despotic version of a Superman analogue, Iron Legacy is similar to the oppressive Superman of the Justice Lords, an alternate version of the Justice League who protect the world through oppression. He is also similar to Regime Superman, another alternate Superman hailing from the Injustice video game and comic series; this version of the character went mad with grief after the Joker tricked him into killing Lois Lane, and subsequently established a dictatorship over the world to ensure that such a tragedy could never happen again.
  • The scene on "Vigilance" is likely a reference to Superman: Red Son by Mark Millar, which featured a Superman raised in communist Russia who became a dictator.
  • April 18th is listed as Legacy’s birthday which is also the date of Paul Revere’s ride who is the namesake for Paul Parsons.

Sources


Leviathan/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Lifeline/References

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Confirmed

  • Using Blood Magic Lifeline was able to take out the intial form of Skinwalker Gloomweaver Letters Page Episode 13. This occurred at the same time as Nightmist was opening the gates.

To Other Works

  • As a sympathetic villain who feels the need to destroy worlds in order to save others, Deadline draws comparisons to the Marvel villain Galactus. His motivation is also similar to the DC villain Relic and the Marvel anti-hero Black Swan.
  • Deadline’s costume design and body coloring are both evocative of Beta Ray Bill, a Marvel superhero who is in turn evocative of Thor.
  • Deadline’s “head-fin” is similar to that of the DC villain Despero.
  • Deadline’s overall design, including the “hover disk” he rides, evoke the character designs of Jack Kirby.
  • The red beam being fired into the Earth on Deadline’s “Remorseful Eco Vandal” side is similar to the “Red Matter” doomsday weapon employed by Nero, the Romulan villain of the Star Trek 2011 reboot movie.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • From Letters Page Episode 24 Deadline/Lifeline
    • Where does he appear in regards to the comic publication history (while he's in the Silver Age Enclave, he himself doesn't seem particularly Silver Age appropriate)? Was he introduced early, but later given motivation? How was that motivation received by the audience? Did different writers show him as more or less sympathetic? What's his relationship with other Endlings like (incap art shows him with Bloogo for example)? There's only one, fairly recent, "Deadline" event, that includes several fights with different heroes. Tarogath as a character predates this by a little, but not back into the Silver Age. He was a background filler character in the Silver Age (as were some of the other aliens), but didn't have any dialog or anything - they were only fleshed out my later writers. Tarogath just turned out to be the most important such character. He was introduced to push that feeling of "everything is going wrong" that was the run-up to the OblivAeon reveal and so there weren't "different writers'" take on him. He was also introduced knowing that he'd become a hero after the horrible actions of his introductory story. As mentioned up top, he's kind of an outsider within the Endling community, but he does have a friendship with Bloogo, who does die when the Enclave is damaged leading up to his becoming Lifeline (there will be an Enclave of the Endlings Episode).
    • What does he know about OblivAeon? Initially, nothing. It's only after Jansa retrieves him after his villain arc that he's told about him (Jansa knows a lot).
    • Was it actually OblivAeon who destroyed his people? It was an ancient entity who has not had a name for the majority of its existence, but is known as Faultless (as it is not at fault for its actions). It used to be the personification of Order, but has been (to simplify) been twisted into a being of Chaos and is eventually a Scion of OblivAeon. It destroyed the Procitors due to their manipulation of ley lines to almost perfectly order their planet and so Faultless was drawn there to destroy them.
    • How did Jansa know this was going to happen, did she warn anybody, why did she allow it? The "early warning" systems in the Enclave kind of gave her a heads-up. Tarogath was a fairly young Procitor (which partly explains his impulsiveness) but was also pretty introspective and just happened to be the one she picked - she has her reasons for who she picks, but it's not necessarily logical from our human perspective. She allowed it because she's not a fighter and can't prevent destruction, she just has her duty to preserve a selected representative.
    • We know that Deadline precedes Progeny, how much damage had Deadline done and what was left for Progeny to really destroy? Was the Chairman concerned about the damage Deadline was doing? As stated, lots of people died and Deadline caused a lot of damage, but he didn't really destroy anything completely. He did damage Rook City, but nothing too far out of what the Chairman would put up with as acceptable collateral from any other super-powered fight and figured he'd still manage to profit from it in the end. If Deadline shows up and you see it on the news you'd think, something like a distant terrorist attack ("that's terrible, those poor people") whereas Progeny is more like discovering that a series of nukes have been set off all over the country - its a bit different of a scale.
    • After Deadline was defeated did he retreat to the Enclave or did Jansa come get him? Jansa, as mentioned in the overview.
    • Did F.I.L.T.E.R. try to intervene? No, they wouldn't go after something as major as Deadline seemed to be. There would be a bunch of cost-benefit analysis before they'd commit.
    • What did the Endlings think of his actions? There are a lot of them, and they have their own reactions, but most probably think it was an awful thing to have done (although some Endlings aren't nice people to begin with and were probably fine with it, but not for his actual reasons). Why he did what he did was hard for anybody to understand.
    • Can we take a moment to recognize that Tarogath is adorable? Sure, why not, I guess.
    • What kind of planet did the Procitors inhabit? Very similar to Earth before all of the ley line manipulation to give it the orderliness that eventually brought Faultless to them. The similarity is part of what made him think that he knew how to save humanity (by killing a bunch of them).
    • What was he like, personality wise? Different as Lifeline? Pretty similar, but as Lifeline who has more information, he's a bit less sad but more arrogant.
    • Did he get any friends as Lifeline? He teams up with Void Guard, and is allies with some others, but he's always standoffish. Might change a bit in the future. Nobody's really had time to get over his villain turn.
    • Why didn't he skip straight to "help fight OblivAeon" instead of trying to kill a bunch of us for our own good? Did he and K.N.Y.F.E. discuss the terrible future they both saw? He didn't know the actual threat - he assumed it would be more like what happened on his world and is "super misguided". Even after he knows what's happening, he still tries to do everything himself rather than working with others and didn't even really meet K.N.Y.F.E. until they're already on the battlefield.
    • Does he see himself as a hero, or does he recognize that he's "sacrificing his soul" as it were? Deadline is one of the few villains who knows that what he's doing is evil (and not "for the sake of evil" like Gloomweaver or Spite). The Chairman and Baron Blade act selfishly, and know that what they're doing will be bad for others, but it's not just mustache-twirling villainy. Deadline isn't out for himself and recognizes that the heroes are right to try to fight him, but he needs to to it anyway.
    • We've been told that the Naturalist is his nemesis due to the thematic relationship to the Earth as a system, but what did the other heroes think about Deadline's reasons for his actions? Who are the other heroes most involved in the Deadline event? Naturalist is a nemesis, in addition to the theme reasons, they have a big scene together in one of the comics during the fight to point out their relationship specifically. Scholar and Visionary have strong reactions too (Scholar regarding ley lines, Visionary on the theme of trying to stop a bad future). Since there were many fights that were part of the event, most heroes were involved in one way or another (all of the major teams are namechecked), but since there wasn't one climactic fight scene ending of the event, there wasn't anything as meaty as the Naturalist's scene to vie for the "nemesis" title. Later, as Lifeline, there's a lot of reticence to accept him, but also not much time for them to come around. Seeing his actions working alongside them during OblivAeon goes a long way, even if they don't actually forgive him.
    • How was his reception by Jansa after his defeat? As stated, he was in a lot of trouble - she considered locking him up like one of the dangerous Endlings. "His story is one of no forgiveness." Given his willingness to act, she allowed him to go out to help during OblivAeon, though.
    • What does the Pandemonium Key do? It shows potential futures - it's part of the "early warning" systems of the Enclave. It's very powerful, but dangerous tool to use - the Varusiod who created it went insane pretty quickly afterwards.
    • When trying to destroy the Earth, did he make efforts to avoid destroying the Maerynian Refuge? He doesn't really know about them at this point. Their homeworld showed up briefly on the Enclave's systems, but since some managed to escape they fell off their radar. His methods of finding important points to destroy never would have brought him to the Refuge as they're not important to the survival of the planet.
    • Did he make any apologies to heroes as Lifeline? Any offer to have one of the heroes to become an Endling if things go wrong? He shows contrition and accepts all blame placed on him by others, but since he still thinks he was acting correctly given the information he had, he offers no apologies and expects no forgiveness. Has has not and cannot forgive himself, so why would anyone else do so? He can't make any offers regarding Endlings - there is a separate story involving a human Endling (Interlude fodder - my guess is Eternal Haka).
    • How does he feel about Tempest? He's not an Endling, but they're still a race that's almost been wiped out. How does Tempest feel about him? Lifeline learns about Tempest's people later. Tempest sees how Tarogath got to where he is and how he made the decisions he did. Lifeline sees Tempest as "not strong enough" to do what it takes to save his people. This came up in the Empyreon fight and culminated in the "teamwork" lesson.
    • Is Lifeline a Vampire (given the Blood Mage connection)? What's the difference if not? Vampires are "creatures of blood magic", but he "uses blood magic". Vampires have gone through specific rituals to basically "become" blood magic. Lifeline is kind of an "energy vampire" in that he can draw energy from others, but he doesn't need to do so to live/doesn't drink blood, etc.
    • One of the preview Lifeline cards shows him fighting Skinwalker Gloomweaver in Dark Watch #18, which is also when Nightmist becomes the gate - how long was Skinwalker around that he's still around in the middle of the OblivAeon events? What are the similarities and differences in the types of blood magic involved? First off (as has been mentioned previously, but possibly after the question was submitted), the ARG events are not during the OblivAeon events, but lead up to it. Skinwalker, Void Guard in the Colosseum, and other events all happen in this lead-in time. The blood magic for Gloomweaver here has more to do with the reanimation of tissue - not keeping things "alive" for an unnatural time (like the vampires). It's a pretty broad category of power and could also have just been called "gross magic" considering that it pretty much covers all of the gross magical stuff that goes on.
    • Deadline's species looks familiar, is this a crossover with the Reptilian Sulph-Orcs from Galactic Strike Force? No, the Sulph-Orcs are not Procitors. That being said, the GSF setting is the same setting, only very far in the future (and shouldn't be seen as the "ending" of either the Tactics or RPG timeline - it's its own thing).

Sources


Luminary/References

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Artwork

  • Vengeance Deck
    • There appears to be a Biometic Plasma Vat behind Baron Blade on the active side of his villain card.
    • The card “Regression Darts” reveals that Nightmist is actually a brunette.
    • Visually, Citizen Slash is similar to the Marvel character Wolverine.
    • Visually, Empyreon is similar to the Silver Samurai, an adversary of Wolverine.
    • Zhu Long is an homage, both in character and design, to classic “yellow peril” villain Fu Manchu. Zhu Long first appeared on the Mr. Fixer card “Pipe Wrench.” His card art seems to confirm that Long and the dragon pictured on Mr. Fixer’s “Overdrive” card are the same being.

Confirmed

  • In the one timeline, Baron Blade eventually kills the current Legacy. In an alternate timeline, Young Legacy dies instead, prompting Legacy to become Iron Legacy. It is heavily suggested that Legacy kills Baron Blade in this alternate timeline.From Iron Legacy's Background

To Other Works

  • As the science-based arch-enemy of a Superman esq. hero (Legacy), Baron Blade draws many easy comparisons to Lex Luthor. As the facially scarred despot of a small nation however, he draws more comparisons to Doctor Doom.
  • Baron Blade has a goatee, a common facial styling for many classic twentieth century villains.
  • The glowing serum (Regression Serum) that Blade is using to harm Legacy on "Hasten Doom" is meant to evoke Kryptonite.
  • The robotic suit that Blade is wearing on his "Vengeful Mad Scientist" side is similar to Lex Luthor's various "Lex-o-skeletons."
  • Much like Lex Luthor has become a hero on occasion Baron Blade will be doing the same with his Luminary persona
  • Vengeance Deck
    • The card “Old Tricks – New Allies” is a parody of the Legacy card “Bolster Allies.”
    • This new version of Blade is much more “hands-on” then his previous incarnations. He is pictured fighting heroes directly on his card art rather than simply through technology and underling proxies.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page Episode 3"
    • Luminary has a mechanical arm. He amputated his own arm to replace it with a "mostly nanotech" gizmo tied into his nervous system. He can turn it into a blade, electrify stuff with it, interface with devices. Derivative of his Flesh-Repair Nanites from his original villain deck. He also helps develop tech for other heroes (although generally with dangerous implications), notably Sky-Scraper (Extremist). He also pulls some old doomsday devices out of mothballs for the event.
    • Some former-villain heroes for OblivAeon are clearly "here's a hero who used to be a villain". Luminary is not one of them, he's acting alongside the heroes against OblivAeon, but he's by no means a hero now. He's not really a central figure in the event (although with a few big hits) but gives up his life to save some heroes (notably Legacy). (See the incap side of the Luminary card, though, as he faked his death).
    • Recruitment of minions: most are from Mordengrad who follow either due to being true-believers or are drafted. Blade Battalion card represents the grunts/conscripts, MDP environment goons with better gear or are working on stuff are the volunteers.
    • Scar hi-jinks - cut scar from Soviet soldier as a teen, burns after his suit explodes in the Ruins of Atlantis fight, exacerbated by the serum that gave him powers, all removed by the Positive Energy Field. Tactics timeline he didn't get any new scars after that, but RPG timeline resulted in a new facial scar in the event of him faking his own death.
    • Funds his Mobile Defense Platform and other stuff by selling weapons to whoever will buy them. After setting up Revocorp that earns him money too.
    • Death of Legacy stuff: in "primary reality" of the game, nobody dies as both Parsons are injured due to the Iron Legacy fight and neither go on the mission that Blade had set as a trap for them on Mars. This plot happens at different times in different realities - in the "successful" ones it's more along the time of when the Terralunar Impulsion Beam plot happened in the primary reality.
    • Revenant is the public-facing CEO of Revocorp in a power suit - initially just a lackey of Blade, but takes more initiative after Blade loses interest.
    • "Beacon" should be used strictly when talking about Felicia's role as a hero in the Tactics timeline - in the Iron Legacy reality she would have been using the Legacy name.
    • On Luminary's incap side, what's in the casket? It's not important. Just note that the heroes present are genuinely saddened since, as far as they're concerned, he died a hero.

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Maerynian Refuge/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Magman/References

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Confirmed

  • Surprisingly, Magman is NOT a member of the Magmaria Race

To Other Works

  • His appearance is close to DC AU villain Magma

Sources


Magmaria/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Mainstay/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Major Flay/References

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Artwork

  • Major Flay is seen grappling with Knyfe on the card "Kinetic Neutralizer"
  • Major Flay was first seen in Visionary's deck on the card "Decoy Projection"

Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Episode 31 - The Visionary:
    • First encounter with Major Flay when Visionary breaks into Project. Cocoon
    • He is one of the Project's early successes - he has tendrils that he can extend from his arms and electrocute people with.
    • He's a true believer and fights her when she shows up to disrupt the project. She's mostly defensive in physical fights, so this is a bit rough for her but she eventually wins (despite having to hold her mental hitchhiker in check the whole time).
  • Seen again in Vengeance. Baron Blade was aware of Project Cocoon (and vice versa) and contracted out Major Flay to capture Visionary to take back to the Project. During the big fight with everybody, Flay finds her and calls her out. She just tears him to pieces, which is a bit of a shock to everybody.

Sources


Man-Grove/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • As a dangerous, shambling monster made of trees and with the word “Man” in its name, Mangrove most resembles the Marvel anti-hero Man-Thing, but also greatly resembles DC's Swamp Thing.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • From Letters Page Nightmist
    • Man-grove is a nemesis, how did they meet as why would she need to go to a swamp? Swamps are great places to go if you're a sorceress. Lots of places of power there (like it's a top spot to go - others include old libraries, abandoned cathedrals). That's why Man-grove even exists in the first place - he was a grove of trees, then a bunch of bodies and toxic waste were dumped there (because Rook City), and then some Gloomweaver cult activity happened there and all of this combined to create Man-grove.
  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • We first see Man-Grove in Nightmist's deck in a swamp which makes sense, later we see him in Fright Train's deck in a sewer - how did he get there? Man-Grove originated as a grove of trees in a swamp near Rook City where a bunch of chemicals were dumped by Pike Industrial and where a bunch of Gloomweaver cult activity took place (because swamp magic). Between all of this, the trees animated into a man-like entity. It eventually wanders into Rook City's sewers. It started out pretty mindless, but developed some sentience over time.
    • We know some of what happens to Man-Grove in the Tactics Timeline, but what about the RPG timeline? In RPG, it's still around, but has a different direction taken. In both timelines it interacted with young Vanessa Long, which coaxes it out of just being a swamp monster - in the RPG timeline it doesn't find what it wants with either people or trees. It's still a villainous character and very protective of plants, but kind of is a wandering entity.
    • Who would win in a fight, Man-Grove or Plague Rat? They've encountered each other in the sewers, but neither has anything the other wants and so they've never had any reason to fight. If they *did* fight, Christopher thinks that Plague Rat has more direct offensive ability, but Adam counters that there's plenty of thorny/constrictive things that Man-Grove could do to kill Plague Rat in a battle of attrition while it would be difficult for Plague Rat to actually do enough damage to it to "kill" Man-Grove. Christopher concedes the point.

Sources


Mayor Overbrook/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • Jim Brooks has descendants that he's not aware of, Rook City was founded by the Over**brook** family - it's a longshot, but is Mayor Overbrook related to him? No, that's a clever theory, but they're unrelated.
    • Does Mayor Overbrook generally run unopposed? If not, does he have them eliminated or is he just more charismatic/less corrupt than the alternative? Why doesn't he have a publicist as "The Barber" is a terrible nickname? To explain this last one, he's called "The Barber" because he always takes a little off the top - meaning he takes a cut of whatever shady dealing are going on in the city. The Overbrook family had been out of power for a while, but when Chairman Pike came to power, he made a deal with the future Mayor Overbook to help bring them back to prominence in exchange for help. He doesn't run unopposed as there are always other candidates, but it's a rigged game (more through voter intimidation than actually tampering with ballots, although that probably happens too). It's all Pike Industrial and the Organization, though, and he's more of a figurehead.

Sources


Megalopolis/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Michelle Hausmann/References

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Confirmed

  • The reporter on Paparazzi on the Scene shows up occasionally; does she have a name and/or are there stories involving her? Is she really a paparazza or a more "legitimate" reporter? Michelle Hausmann is a recurring side character. She does occasionally get in trouble and has to be saved, other times she's involved in doing investigatory things. At the time of that card she's a member of the paparazzi, getting footage of heroes and putting up sensationalist stories about them online, but later she becomes a more mainstream reporter for the Megalopolis Daily Post. Different writers had different takes on her and so she has inconsistent characterization with regards to her reporting and it's gone back and forth a bunch (champion of the truth vs. hack reporter), but by the "present" of the comics she's seen as a legitimate reporter and is seen as more helpful than harmful.

Sources


Miss Information/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Miss Information was known as The Assistant during Playtesting. This was a bit of a 'miss information' ... Kickstarter Update
  • Miss Information was a 60k stretch reward for the Shattered Timelines Kickstarter. "Aminia Twain is actually the second place winner from our Create a Villain contest, though it was a tentative victory as it wouldn't happen if we didn't hit this Stretch Reward! So, you can all thank Ashley Wagner for her fantastic concept" (Christopher, >G) Kickstarter Update

Sources


Mittermeiers/References

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No Clarifications for any Game System regarding this character/environment yet


Mobile Defense Platform/References

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Artwork

  • It was stated somewhere by the creators of SOTM that after Baron Blade was defeated, the MDPs were seized primarily by the Citizens of the Sun as headquarters for their movement. The art of the Bridge card supports this, as it shows several Citizens setting up shop in the control room of the Platform.

Confirmed

Sources


Mordengrad/References

Edit this Reference

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Mordengrad is to Baron Blade what Latveria is to Doctor Doom in the Marvel Universe. At this location they are hailed as the leader and can do no wrong.

Sources


Mr. Fixer/References

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Artwork

  • Fixer is fighting the Dreamer's Granite Oni projection on the card "Hoist Chain."
  • The scar on Dark Watch:Mr. Fixer promo card is the same place that The Operative is striking Mr Fixer on the card 'Undivided Attention'
  • The villain on the back of DWMF striking him is called Heartbreaker, and he will be part of another deck. Christopher on the Forums (he wound up appearing in the Vengeance-style Miss Information deck).
    • The scene shown is during the Vengeance events when Heartbreaker ambushes Mr. Fixer while Dark Watch is busy fighting Proletariat clones.

Confirmed

'

  • The Kanji on Mr. Fixer's Incapacitated Side reads "Owari", or 'End'. The other is a signature block, and is written in katakana, a Japanese phonetic syllabry that is typically used for foreign words. It reads "Adamu Rebotaro", i.e., Adam Rebottaro. In addition to his Nemesis symbol (to fix/mend), the other Kanji on his cards is on the style cards; they may be for the appropriate animals Forum Post by dpt
  • Mr Fixer has Always been Blind >G Forum Post
  • Dark Watch Mr. Fixer's "Bitter Strike" power still counts as a "strike." Forum post
  • DWMF In Progress - Photo taken at Origins 2013. Overheard Adam speaking that the scar is from where The Operative hit him on the card Undivided Attention and that his beard would have less grey in it due to him 'Coming back' - Mr. Fixer is killed by the Operative, but he is reanimated by Zhu Long (Letters Page 10).
  • Due to the fact that he and The Operative are nemeses, as well as certain commonalities in their back-stories, it can be assumed that the martial arts school The Operative attended as a child was the same one that Mr. Fixer used to run (Confirmed Letters Page 10).

Unconfirmed

  • The dragon that Mister Fixer is punching on "Overdrive" is the villain Zhu Long transformed. Zhu Long was later made into a Nemesis card in Baron Blade's Vengeance deck. His human form is portrayed on "Pipe Wrench."

To Other Works

  • Zhu Long is visually similar to the pulp villain Fu-Manchu, one of the characters to kick-start the "yellow peril" character stereotype. Such villains were common in low budget martial-arts films of the sixties and seventies, an era which Mr. Fixer strongly emulates.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page Episode 10:
      • Does he carry around these mechanics tools with him? Does anybody suggest he use more traditional weapons? Are the tool cards just placeholders for whatever martial-arts or improvised weaponry he winds up using? The tools aren't specific to his fighting style, they represent the idea that he's improvising with what's available. He's not using traditional weapons (Black Fist would have), but now he goes in unarmed and just makes use of whatever's available.
      • Why not start using the Black Fist name again? How does he feel about fighting alongside other heroes (before and after resurrection)? Modern writers changed the name - the Black Fist name is a product of a specific time and modern writers didn't want to dredge that back up. Beyond that, there's an outlook change between them - Black Fist was pretty ideological, Mister Fixer is more cynical (even the name is kind of ironic, he can't fix everything, but he tries to fix what he can). This is the first time he's really working with heroes as he was mostly a solo hero up until Dark Watch. He liked having allies on the occasions he worked with others before his death; after he's just angry about literally everything.
      • Does he have any wuxia/chi abilities or is his skill just 100% martial arts? His abilities are 150% martial arts, he's elevated his skill beyond what you would normally call "martial arts". Sure, you can call it "chi" or whatever, and you could say that he has superpowers, but the powers are in the form of "is so good at kung fu that he's able to do stuff that we kind of have to call super powers because what else are you going to call them". It's not "magic" that he can Grease Monkey Fist his punch into doing fire damage or something, it's just down to his martial arts training.
      • During the first fight with Expat he just disarms/blocks, no attacks - would he have taken that approach with anybody or did he see something special in her? Prior to his death, when being attacked by an unknown assailant he probably would have at least *started* with this approach, moving on to defeating (not killing) them if necessary. With Expat he could tell that there was something else going on and started asking the questions (which could have happened to other people too, but still a different reaction than random thugs would have gotten).
      • Is Mister Fixer's fighting prowess something he adapted his mechanic skills to? Prior martial arts training/extra powers other than that? Prior training, see previous discussion/answers. But they want to be specific on this, his only other "power" would be his ability to sense things around him with his aura. It's what makes him such a good mechanic too, but if he'd focused his life on being a mechanic he'd be light-years beyond his current mechanic-skill level.
      • The Organization is big in Rook City, why not more focus on the Wraith given her presence? Why is Fixer the Nemesis of both the Chairman and Operative? Operative has a personal connection with him and that history is the source of the animosity. A difference with the Wraith is a matter of focus - she's dealing with symptoms (individual crimes) while Fixer is going after the source (going after the Organization directly). She's an annoyance, but also has the rest of the Freedom Five to back her up if they take her out. He's just a guy operating on his own.
      • How many heroes know that he's blind? Most that he's worked with know because they have seen his eyes - the shadows are just a stylistic art choice. He still moves in a way that might give it away, but they can't really show that in card art. It's not a secret, but the guys liked not giving it away up front and giving clues over time.
      • Did he have a family or romantic relationships? "Slim" never had any romantic relationships, "Black Fist" had a ton. This is a result of the type of comics he was appearing in. Opening the school was a way for him to have surrogate children.
      • Does Fixer have any problems with Nightmist's magic in opposition to his martial arts thing? It's complicated due to the fact that he was never part of an official "team" until after his death, at which point he doesn't care. [Aside here about how Zhu Long's reanimation process is dealing with stuff older and darker than anything Nightmist is working with - Zhu Long "has forgotten more magic than Nightmist will ever know."]
      • [Another Arcanus Lupus limerick] Why is he Black Fist in the Enclave of the Endlings? The Enclave is a '60s event (and this is a flashback scene), thus the style, so that's why he's Black Fist. It's a rare crossover story where both he and Legacy appeared in the same story instead of Black Fist being in a separate "B" story in a Justice Comics issue.
      • Is it true that if he's shown not wearing his hat in the card game, that he's dead? Yes.
      • What happened to him in Freedom Six timeline, how did Unity get the hat? He was killed in that timeline. Prior to that, when Unity was injured and was dying, he helped her transfer her mind into the Unity bot. He didn't have the heart to tell it that wasn't really Unity and maintained their friendship. When he died, she kept the hat as a memento.
      • Who/what are the Rook City Renegades? It's the title of a comic series that is used as a source for the quotes on many cards. The book itself is an anthology series dealing with Rook City events, but isn't the name of a team. Well, not a hero or villain team - it's the local baseball team. They're all jerks. The Hippo used to play for them. Fixer's hat is actually for this team.
      • Any specific philosophy? His is largely informed by his master, Shuen Zhang. There's definitely some Buddhism in there, but it's beyond just that.
      • Is he the most skilled hand-to-hand combatant in the game? If not, where does he rank? Does this change after his death and resurrection? Who else could "go the distance" with him? Yes, the most skilled. Others may punch harder. Fanatic and Haka are both really good melee combatants, but Fixer is the most skilled/trained/precise. Part of it is if you're above a certain threshold in strength, skill starts to not matter quite as much. Operative can go the distance, Fanatic and Haka could but not because of their skill and more just the ability to take punishment, K.N.Y.F.E. is quite good but is more of a bar-room brawler type. It's hard to do one-to-one skill matchups - Expat is *very* skilled, but all of her training is in ranged combat (but even then, there's a question of how far away do they have to start from one another before that would give her a definitive edge).
      • The Scion Faultless "fixes" him during OblivAeon, what is he fixing here? As has been established earlier, Fixer has reason to be furious about - his body is broken/dead, his soul is stuck haunting his own corpse, etc. Faultless was able to restore him, he's actually alive again after this point.

Sources


Muerto/References

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Confirmed

  • Muerto is Thiago, from 'Potential Sidekick' in Spite's Deck.
  • Thiago goes on to take up the mantle of Ra in the Miststorm Universe

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • From Podcast Episode 74
  • Why does Muerto look so haphazardly put together? He's a pile of wreckage and wasn't so much "constructed" as "cobbled together into the best approximation possible".
  • What's Muerto's deal [enters a bunch of options in quick succession]? "Ghost possessing a robot" is pretty close. Also, when he possesses other devices the skull motif lines goes with him.
  • How does a cyborg relate to the teenager situation? Because he's a teenager's ghost haunting a robot. He does the brooding, sit in the corner and mope teenager thing, only with much better reasons for doing so. He really is one of the most heroic members of the team, though, as he's the one who's there for all of the right reasons. The cruel irony is that he's the one that had such a crushing loss to get him there.

Sources


Muse/References

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Artwork

The Dreamer

  • The Dreamer and her projections have more cameos in hero decks than any other villain.
  • The "Treacherous Ape" is, in reality, the doll floating at the Dreamer's side on her "The Dreamer Dreams" side. The Treacherous Ape first appeared on Tachyon's "Lightning Reflexes" card. Tachyon is in the Flavor text of the "Treacherous Ape" card.
  • The "Dark Hero" projection looks very similar to the villain that Legacy was fighting on "Thokk."
  • The Dreamer is incapacitating Sky Scraper in "Projected Paralysis."

Confirmed

The Dreamer

  • Mainstay has a line in the flavor text of "Whipacorn."
  • The Dreamer has the lowest HP of any Sentinels villain.
  • The Dreamer is one of two base-set Sentinels villains to have a non-promo time-line duplicate, the other being Omnitron. Greatest Legacy and GI Bunker are the Hero Versions.
  • The Argent Adept's dialogue in the flavor text of "Grotesque Arachnoid" hints that the Dreamer's condition may stem from an outside source, namely "another world."
  • Her Teddy Bear (on Night Terrors) is named Noah >G Comment from the Gathering of Heroes 2014
  • "The child is the center" refers to The Dreamer. A hint at this can be found on the infamous card "Fixed Point". The "Fixed Point" is that in every reality, young Vanessa Long manifests powers. The Visionary came from her time to prevent the Vanessa Long of this reality from going through what she did, and yet, this reality's Vanessa Long STILL manifested powers. This is important, because these "Fixed Points" across spacetime is how OblivAeon is destroying everything. The more points that realities have in common, the more they draw "close" and if multiple realities are too close, they act as cosmic anti-matter, destroying each other. The Child is the Center

To Other Works

The Dreamer

  • The Illusory Demon bears a strong resemblence to the Marvel villain Venom.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

The Dreamer

  • Notes from Letters Page 31 - Visionary
    • Why did the Dreamer have such strong nightmares? What's the new awareness of the world mentioned in her bio? It's connected to OblivAeon - the young Vanessa has these psychic powers and when the timelines shatter it affects her.
    • Is there a reason her dress changes on her flip side art? It's there to represent how casually her power can change physical reality. The progression of the "fight" is Sleeping -> Waking up (which is her flip side and is the most dangerous time) -> Awake (victory). The heroes have to get her through the waking up phase. It's like the old wives tale about how you're not supposed to wake up a sleepwalker.
    • What's the importance of the Teddy-Ape since it shows up so much? It's her favorite toy. All of her projections are derived from things she's seen or are afraid of in life.
    • Her "Decoy Projection" card is a Distortion and therefore half of the Realm of Discord's cards destroy it, what's the in-story reason? Her powers don't work as well there due to the general weirdness there that interferes with her projections.
    • Is the crystal in the toy orangutan an OblivAeon shard? No.
    • Are the Dreamer's projections foreshadowing things to come (Dark Hero for Iron Legacy, etc.)? Nope, they're all stuff from her life and her psyche. The Grotesque Arachnoid is because she's afraid of spiders. Dark Hero is her fear that these superheroes out there in the world could turn bad and come for her. The tooth fairy is her interpretation of what her parents told her about a tiny fairy that comes for your teeth. The Whipacorn is because unicorns are too good to be true - there's no way they're not up to something. The Treacherous Ape is treacherous because the toy is her most trusted friend, but what if it turned on her? The Toy Master's flavor text about it being the thing that Visionary wanted to avoid is because in Project Cocoon a lot of the tests they put her through involved toys - the primary trainer guy in that process, and the memory of him, is what the Dreamer is pulling on to create this twisted version.
    • What do each of the Dreamer's projections represent? Most were already covered. Illusory Demon is a manifestation of her general fear of the dark/evil - standard "monster under the bed" kind of thing. They're all based on her experiences.

Muse

  • Notes from Letters Page 74 - Daybreak
  • How does Muse view the Dreamer event? How do the other heroes feel about having her around given memories of the event? She's aware of it, remembers it, and it's a source of trauma due to her parents' reaction. The other heroes aren't worried about her now (well, a few might think that it is a little weird that she's around after everything, but nobody thinks she needs to be locked up or anything). The awareness of everything Visionary has gone through gives people perspective.
  • How do Visionary and Muse feel about one another? It's not that weird for them because nearly all of their life experiences have been different - they're different people from very different worlds. "Testing performed on them as babies" and "psychic powers" is pretty much the common experience for them. They also don't really interact all that much or have much in common besides the psychic thing. Visionary very much wants all the best for Muse, but knows that being around isn't the best thing for her.
  • Do Muse and Rockstar fight crime in heels? Isn't that uncomfortable/dangerous? Muse doesn't do a lot of the running/jumping style of heroics, and Rockstar wears the sorts of shoes she would wear on stage (and has the whole rock protection thing going on in the first place). Adam takes issue with the idea that heels are always going to interfere with movement - look at dancers who can move just fine in heels.
  • What prompted Muse to join a hero team (is she making up for things, was she involved in the OblivAeon fight and got a taste for it, etc.)? Does she deal with a lot of distrust or were the details of the Dreamer event not well known? There were some heroes that knew what really was going on, but the world at large has no idea what was behind the nightmarish events in Ravenwood. She became a hero because she always wanted to do something good with her powers (with Visionary as a role-model), but she didn't have a home any more and the Sentinels of Freedom welcomed her in.
  • Muse looks a lot different than expected; is she eternally grumpy or was the picture we were given just of her on a bad day? She's not grumpy, but she is very serious and tends to concentrate on things (plus has a resting face that just looks kind of grumpy, that's not her fault, though). She's not mean.
  • How much control does Muse have on her powers? An okay amount of control, but also an extremely high fear of losing control and so she tends to be vigilant about them. Sometimes her powers key off of fear, though (her own or others) and so sometimes that can backfire.
  • Why is Muse's outfit so creepy? She likes to prey on people's fears (although she boosts her friends' morale). It's also brightly colored, so it's not really meant to be scary.

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Naturalist/References

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Artwork

  • The triceratops on “Blend into the Pack” are from Insula Primalis.
  • The birds attacking the Naturalist on “Cornered Beast” are servants of the Matriarch. The card keys on being outnumbered by non-hero targets, a common occurrence against that villain.
  • The tentacles attacking Doc Tusser on “Environmental Allies” hail from the ruins of Atlantis
  • "Hyperactive Senses" shows the Naturalist seeing through Glamour's illusions.
  • "Indomitable Force" shows the Naturalist protecting Idealist from Deadline's Atomic End-Glaive.

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • The Naturalist’s shapeshifting powers are evocative of Beast Boy and, to a lesser extent, Animal Man, two DC Comics staples. The fact that his animal forms are tinted green furthers the comparisons with Beast Boy.
  • The Naturalist’s views on nature preservation, as well as his distaste for environmental destruction, are common character tropes for superheroes that emerged during the 70’s.
  • The Naturalist’s symbol is a West African adinkra symbol called "sesa wo suban", which literally means "transform your life". It represents the journey toward perfection.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • From Letters Page Episode 23 - The Naturalist
    • What's the extent of his powers/how many animals can he turn into? It's very nebulous, he's got a magical attunement (as mentioned in previous episodes like Nightmist and Matriarch), but not really in a "spell casting" sense. He's powered by "earth magic" via his connection to Akash'Bhuta). We see him turn into the three canonical animals in his deck, plus the Vulture form during OblivAeon. He does get a few more, to be mentioned later. There is an alternate-timeline version of him shown in La Capitan's VotM deck that shows him as a small bird (like a parrot), showing that different universes' Naturalists wind up with different forms since they're tied to specific circumstances that impart important life lessons to him.
    • The alt-art version of Hunted Naturalist's incap art shows him as a hyena, can he turn into other animals besides the 3 in his deck, if not what's going on here? When he went to save Akash'Bhuta from Professor Pollution, she did not initially respond to him and he went off by himself and tried to create another form. He managed to turn into a hyena, but couldn't change back. He returns to her and she agrees to help him and changes him back, but this is the "Eureka!" moment that convinces her of the need to change. The hyena form's lesson is "don't reach for things not meant for you" (the vulture form's lesson is something like "don't have expectations about what you need").
    • Based on his bio, he seems to be on the periphery of the major events of the Multiverse, mostly being tied up in his own struggles and transformation, is that an accurate read on his situation? Are there major events where he's more central (and if so which)? This has mostly been answered, but the guys really wanted to drive home this question's initial statement - he's a side-character, but there's still a lot for him to do over in the sidelines. He's still involved in some major fights, but as mentioned this results in kind of a disjointed feel for him as written.
    • Is he only able to transform into animals or can he change into objects or other people? Just animals (and specifically, just those animals). He's not shape-shifting in the same way Guise does where he's just moving his body parts around into a different shape, he's magically becoming these other animals (although with the weirdness involved in his "Hunted" era he can do strange combinations of attributes between them). In the same way that Legacy is "a guy, but with other weird powers", when he's a crocodile he's "a crocodile, but with other weird powers".
    • Where was he during Progeny's assault? Already mentioned, he's off with Akash'Thriya, getting her up to speed as a "hero".
    • In his bio, it's mentioned that he's pretty mad at Argent Adept by the time he's through his initial "training" phase, does he retain any of that animosity later after his journey back to humanity? He's certainly furious at Akash'Bhuta and AA during the initial crocodile form event (that form being one of fury to begin with), but it's worth noting that his journey isn't really one "back to humanity" rather than one forward into something new. He and AA get along well now.
    • His original costume, with its clean lines and classic "superhero spandex" look, kind of seems odd for him given his naturalistic power set, why did he choose this as his look? He doesn't seem to care about his identity being secret, so why the mask? He's definitely trying to protect his identity - see all of the assassination attempts. People who know him as Michael Conteh, former head of this big oil company and people who know of the shape-changing hero known as the Naturalist do not know that they're the same person, although they both have enemies. He chose the outfit because he likes green and it's a useful color for camouflage (and is very different from anything he wore in his civilian life).
    • What's the deal with his "star" logo? It's a West African (specifically the Akan people in what is now Ghana) Adinkra symbol meaning "change" or "transformation", implying a personal change (rather than the literal shape-shifting he does).
    • Why did the Argent Adept not invite him to join the Prime Wardens? He did, Naturalist didn't want to be on a team because he had his own stuff to do on earth specifically and the Prime Wardens are off-planet periodically.
    • Why did he not seek out the Argent Adept when his powers started to lose control? He was kind of busy with the whole "being hunted" thing, but it's also not particularly easy to track AA down as it's much more likely that AA will find you - which is what happened when they found Naturalist on Dok'Thorath.
    • What caused his powers to go wild? La Capitan's meddling and the severed ley lines mentioned previously.
    • What was offered to Ambuscade as a reward for capturing him? Money ("over a million dollars" "less than a billion").
    • Does he ever regain control or at least left in peace? What a good segue into...
  • Future:
    • He and Lifeline work together to repair the ley lines to help stabilize the world. This more or less happens during the OblivAeon event, so strictly speaking isn't the "future" yet, but it's necessary to set up the other stuff where the Naturalist's story is kind of bound together with Akash'Thriya's fate.

Sources


Nephthys/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Nexus of the Void/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • The Nexus of the Void is also known as Spirit Island in another universe, referencing to one of GtG's other products, Spirit Island

Sources


Night Snake/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Nightmist/References

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Artwork

  • The card "Mists of Time" has numerous Easter Eggs and references in its artwork. From the bottom-left moving clockwise, it portrays:
    • A statue of Grand Warlord Voss
    • Legacy cradling the battered body of Paulina Parsons, an event which foreshadows the origin of Iron Legacy and visually refers to the cover of DC Comic's //Crisis On Infinite Earths// #7.
    • Akash'Bhuta's face dominating the surface of the planet Earth.
    • An unknown cosmic being gripping the Earth in the palm of its hand. As a purple cosmic entity of more-than-likely malign intent, this character is probably an analogue to the Marvel character Galactus, the eater of worlds.
    • Paulina Parsons cradling the battered form of Legacy, an image copied from the incapacitated side of Legacy's character card.
  • The silhouetted figure on "Astral Premonition" is Apostate.
  • "Oblivion" offers a glimpse at Nightmist's struggle to prevent Gloomweaver access to this dimension.
  • "Mistbound" shows Grand Warlord Voss being restrained by mist.
  • Nightmist faces off against The Seer on "Heedless Lash".
  • Adam drew this in 2014 showing Nightmist taking on a Nazi ghost GtGAdam Twitter

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • The pentagrams shown on "Amulet of the Elder Gods," "Elder Ring," and "Oblivion" are Elder Signs. They are potent symbols of magic featured prominently in Fantasy Flight's Arkham Horror board game based on the horror stories of H.P. Lovecraft (and others). In Arkham Horror, Elder Signs are gathered by players to permanently seal portals to horrific alternate dimensions. Nightmist is using an Elder Sign to seal a portal shut on "Oblivion."
  • The inclusion of Elder Signs in Nightmist's artwork is just one of her many references/connections to the Arkham Horror series:
    • Nightmist is the descendant of Joe Diamond, the private eye character featured in the Arkham Horror base set.
    • Nightmist's powers stem from the Mists of R'lyeh. R'lyeh is an ancient underwater city that plays a prominent role in many Lovecraft novels and short stories. It also appears in Arkham Horror as an alternate dimension.
    • In addition to the above, "Mists of R'lyeh" is also a spell card in Arkham Horror. The card increases a player's stealth abilities, allowing them to sneak past enemies with greater ease. The card's artwork features a silhouetted man wearer a fedora and suit. The artwork for Joe Diamond's character card shows him wearing a fedora and suit, furthering the connection between the Mist's of R'lyeh and Nightmist.
    • Nightmist's goal of sealing Gloomweaver from the SOTM dimension mirrors the central goal of the Arkham Horror games, i.e. sealing away the Elder Gods.
  • The references above are intentional Easter eggs planted by the Greater Than Games staff and Nightmist's creator, Richard Launius. Richard Launius is the author of the Arkham Horror games
  • The card "Mistbound" includes two street signs in its artwork which read "KIRBY ST" and "TIMM BLVD." These are references to Jack Kirby, a pivotal artist of the Golden and Silver ages of comics, and Bruce Timm, the director of the Emmy-winning Batman animated series and its various spin-offs.
  • Several elements of Nightmist's backstory are clearly inspired by or references to the Cthulhu Mythos:
    • Nightmist's hometown, Arkham, Massachusetts, is a common setting in media related to the Cthulhu Mythos. It is town in which Miskatonic University, another famous Mythos setting, is located. Miskatonic University first appeared in the 1922 short "Herbert West: Reanimator" by HP Lovecraft. Arkham was first named in Lovecraft's "The Unknowable" in 1923.
    • R'lyeh is the name of the lost underwater city in which the elder god Cthulhu is imprisoned. It was first mentioned in HP Lovecraft's "Call of Cthulhu" in 1928.
    • Tome of Elder Magic is reminiscent of various books of forgotten or dangerous lore in the Cthulhu Mythos, most notably the Necronomicon, but there are many others.
  • Richard Launius created Nightmist and his nemesis purely as a fan thing, the >G crew saw his efforts and asked if he would like to co-design an expansion with them. Examples of the first Nightmist can be seen here, here, here and here
  • As a side note, the name "Arkham" was paid homage by DC comics with the now famous Elizabeth Arkham Asylum for the Criminally Insane, colloquially known as "Arkham Asylum," which first appeared in Batman #258 in 1974.
  • "Master of Magic" and "Oblivion" tie into a separate continuity, that of Marvel's Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme. He's often depicted making hand signs resulting in various ring-shaped glowing effects around his hands.
    • Likewise, the "Tome of Elder Magic" also has a Doctor Strange parallel with the Book of the Vishanti and its evil counterpart, the Darkhold.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page Episode 12
      • What happens to her after OblivAeon? She is gone, for real. Noble sacrifice and probably the most important such sacrifice that allowed the event to be winnable.
      • Due to Joe Diamond tie-in, does Sentinel Comics share a setting with Arkham Horror? Nightmist and Gloomweaver were co-created by the guys and Richard Launius, one of the designers of the Arkham Horror board games. Mutual fandom got them all talking and they adapted some of his fan-created decks and ideas into the Nightmist, Gloomweaver, and the Realm of Discord decks for SotM. So, yes, they're tangentially related.
      • Is Faye Diamond becoming the gate a "fixed point" across realities, or are there still some out there in the multiverse? There are still realities with Faye Diamond, there are still realities with some version of "Nightmist" (not necessarily Faye), but as both the RPG and Tactics timelines branch off from the main card game timeline, she's not present in either.
      • What's The Curse book and how does it fit into the other titles? Already explained, backstory mini-series just after her introduction in FFA #6.
      • When/how does she get all of her artifacts? What happens to them after she becomes the gate? Amulet of the Elder Gods is the amulet she found in the storage unit mentioned previously. Tome of Elder Magic was given to her by the Master. Starshield Necklace was given to her by the witches before they kicked her out. Elder Ring was recovered from some Gloomweaver cultists who she defeated in The Curse books. Harpy uses the Amulet, the rest are kept by her but aren't something she uses.
      • What's the nature of her magic? We know that Zhu Long has older/darker magic, for example. She has artifacts, which could help just about everybody. Some people are naturally attuned to magic, and lacking that makes it very very difficult (like a lifetime of study). Having artifacts makes that process easier even without the innate ability. Faye has some innate ability, but the curse makes things easier too.
      • Where is the Kraken? We see her using "Planar Banishment" on one (there is more than one of them), sending it into another reality.
      • Her incap art shows her being locked behind her own magic, what's going on here? This is her banishing herself into the ethereal realm after her first battle with the Ennead and finding herself locked out of her own reality.
      • She seems focused, does she relax/have hobbies? She likes going to a local diner, doing the crossword, having black coffee and some pie.
      • She seems to have a lot of mentors (Grandpa Joe, the Master), is she the most mentored? Joe isn't a mentor for her as she never met him. She feels a connection to him (through his case files, from being near his essence when confronting Gloomweaver), but that's it. She wouldn't be the "most mentored" - Unity gets a lot of hands-on help, for example. Black Fist and the Operative get more mentoring. She's more "trained" than "mentored".
      • Had the witches had any presence other than in her backstory? They're fairly friendly, but haven't been present outside of the Nightmist book.
      • Has the Master been around much outside of her backstory? He shows up regularly in her solo book, more near the beginning, but less so after her training is complete. He's weird, we don't learn much about him.
      • Does she ever find out what happened to Joe (and what's up with the age disparity)? His essence was captured (and eventually destroyed) by Gloomweaver. We know that her parents were already on the older side when she was born and that Joe had disappeared when Thomas was pretty young. Also Comic Book Time - "Nightmist" debuted in the 1970s and she's still in her 20s.
      • In "Mists of Time" we see a few other events we recognize, Legacy incap stuff and OblivAeon, but what about Voss and Akash'Bhuta images? Voss is a statue from the reality where he conquers earth (also seen in Visionary's deck), Akash'Bhuta is one where she's succeeded in taking over the earth.
      • Man-grove is a nemesis, how did they meet as why would she need to go to a swamp? Swamps are great places to go if you're a sorceress. Lots of places of power there (like it's a top spot to go - others include old libraries, abandoned cathedrals). That's why Man-grove even exists in the first place - he was a grove of trees, then a bunch of bodies and toxic waste were dumped there (because Rook City), and then some Gloomweaver cult activity happened there and all of this combined to create Man-grove.
      • What's her relationship to the [Rod] of Anubis? While in the Tomb of Anubis she channels power through the Rod of Anubis, but Anubis is right there so there's not a role to her to fill like what happened to Ra or the Ennead (more detail on how that stuff works in their episodes). The Rod of Anubis and the Staff of Ra operate differently in the card game timeline.
      • What's going on with her using "Enlightenment" on Argent Adept? What kind of bond do they have as magic users? She spent time in the Void when she was doing her power-up stuff. The Argent Adept is the Virtuoso of the Void and his power comes from there anyway. Her magic isn't Void-based, but having been there she learns a lot about it. Since he's still trying to figure out his powers, she uses her expertise to help him learn and imparts this magically since explaining it verbally wasn't working. They get along well, even though they have different paths in magic. They consider each other colleagues. She has to study a lot while he's more into improvisation.
      • She has an "Astral Premonition" in Absolution #18 ("I shall not allow you to ravage this world as you have others!") what's going on here? Fighting Apostate (and how does she handle his type of magic)? What's Fanatic up to? They talking about Earth? This is an early appearance of Nightmist in other heroes' books. She shows up, sees Fanatic and assumes she's a baddie who needs to be stopped. She'd had a vision of the world in flames and a winged figure in charge. Classic hero vs. hero event. Nightmist eventually recognizes that Fanatic isn't the same entity that she'd seen in her vision, but predicts that Apostate is gonna happen and winds up being one of Fanatic's allies during that fight (more in the Fanatic/Apostate episodes).

Sources


Nixious the Chosen/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Nuit/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

OblivAeon(Villain)/References

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Confirmed

  • "The child is the center" refers to The Dreamer. A hint at this can be found on the infamous card "Fixed Point". The "Fixed Point" is that in every reality, young Vanessa Long manifests powers. The Visionary came from her time to prevent the Vanessa Long of this reality from going through what she did, and yet, this reality's Vanessa Long STILL manifested powers. This is important, because these "Fixed Points" across spacetime is how OblivAeon is destroying everything. The more points that realities have in common, the more they draw "close" and if multiple realities are too close, they act as cosmic anti-matter, destroying each other. The Child is the Center

To Other Works

  • OblivAeon based on size and near invulnerability seems like a reference to Galactus from Marvel. Adding onto this is the fact he sends out those he has empowered before he fully arrives in Scions much like Galactus had the Silver Surfer.

Sources


Omnitron-X/References

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Artwork

  • Omnitron-X: The card "Disruptive Flechettes" is a reference to Omnitron's "Sedative Flechettes," with Citizen Dawn taking the place of Haka in the character artwork.
  • Omnitron-IV: Omnitron’s appearance on “Overcharged Systems” and the divider card is a reference to GLaDOS, the unsympathetic-yet-passive-aggressive AI villain of the Portal video game series.
  • The incapacitated art on the Omnitron-U foil card represents the "mental" battle going on between Omnitron-X and Omnitron-IV at the moment when Unity returned to the latter site to "bury" her Omnibot. The moment depicted is when Omnitron-X's programming latched onto the returned chassis that Unity had built, giving it an edge over the other Omnitron systems present and the "birth" of Omnitron-U.

Confirmed

  • Many of Ominitron-X's flavor text quotes are inverted versions of Omnitron's quotes.

Unconfirmed

  • Omnitron
    • The "S-84 Assault Drone" card has flavor text that mirrors Haka's "Rampage" card.
    • The being that revived Cosmitron will be a villain in a future expansion From Christopher OblivAeon??

To Other Works

  • Omnitron
    • Omnitron's closest "real" character parallel is DC's Brainiac, Superman's robotic nemesis that was based on a Kryptonian supercomputer. Like Omnitron, Brainiac can rebuilt itself from even the smallest fragment of its technology, has upgraded itself many times, and a future version of it became a hero -- Brainiac 5, founding member of the Legion of Superheroes in the 31st century -- when it discovered compassion. Omnitron also takes elements from Ultron, a maniacal robot villain from the Marvel universe that had also been altered by cosmic forces, and possibly Marvel's "Master Mold" Sentinel.
    • The flavor text for "Electro-Pulse Explosive" is a reference to the film Batman starring Adam West.
    • The S-84 Automaton Drones resemble Terminators.
  • Omnitron-IV
    • With the release of Omnitron IV, Omnitron is the only character in SOTM to be represented with all three deck types (Villain, Hero, and Environment).
    • While Omnitron IV is not truly the fourth iteration of Omnitron to be published by Greater Than Games, he is the fourth in terms of story canon. His in-story predecessors are the original Omnitron, Cosmic Omnitron, and Omni-Blade. In terms of the Sentinels of the Multiverse card-game publication, he was preceded by Omnitron, Cosmic Omnitron, Omnitron X, and Omni-blade, making him the fifth card-game incarnation of the character. However if the Sentinels Tactics game is included in this history then he is actually the //sixth// incarnation, following the versions mentioned above and the Tactics version, Omnitron V, which was released after Omnitron X.
  • Omnitron-X
    • Omnitron-X's design and card artwork pay reference to Capcom's Megaman X video game franchise:
      • Both Omnitron-X and Megaman X are blue robots that change color when they use certain equipment.
      • Both characters have arm cannons.
      • The font used for Omnitron-X's name on his character card is virtually identical to the one used for the SNES Megaman X game titles. Both use metallic chrome letters for the characters' main names, with the letter X enlarged and colored gold.
      • Obviously, both characters' names end with "X."
    • In terms of his personality and character biography, Omnitron-X is very similar to the DC Comics' Braniac-5. Both characters are future versions of robotic super-villains which seek redemption for their sordid legacy. Both have very logic-driven personalities. Also, both make use of time travel on a frequent basis.
    • Omnitron-X's physical appearance is very similar to that of Zeta, the central character of the DC Animated series The Zeta Project.
    • "True story: When we first invented him, we hadn't locked down what we were calling him, so for a few weeks he was Omni-Ron." Adam on >G Forum

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page 9:
      • What part of human society does X find most fascinating? Empathy doesn't automatically allow him to understand the illogical nature of human behavior, so that's a big one. Human reproduction is also weird - why don't they just grow them in vats or something? Jokes are hard, but Unity tries to help. Food that isn't just a nutrient slurry. Why do you waste the nutrients in dead people by just burying them?
      • What happens between Omnitron V and Omnitron X? The guess is that the question is about the version that appears in Tactics, but take a look at the chart - there isn't a succession between the Tactics version and Omnitron X due to time travel shenanigans. Even if there would be successive versions in the main timeline to get to a tenth iteration, it would necessarily be a different entity than our Omnitron X hero.
      • Will we see VI, VII, VIII, and IX eventually? There is the possibility to see something like this in the Tactics timeline eventually (more later), but not in the RPG timeline (for reasons), and we aren't likely to see the versions of these present in X's home timeline.
      • From Omnitron's perspective, what is the most absurd/funny thing humans do? See the earlier question. More answers: keep pets, swim (or any exercise) for fun, having yards around the house (because of lawn maintenance), entertainment media (they imagine a case where X downloads a book and just assimilates all information at once until Unity tells it the proper way to go through it sequentially).
      • How aware of his surroundings is Omnitron IV? Has keen awareness of its surroundings, but it's limited in comprehension/care to "Can [x] be assimilated/is [x] a threat to the production process?"
    • Future:
      • Tactics - Omnitron V is what was left over of the programming in the IV factory after U leaves. The Chokepoint battle got this remainder stirred up again and able to continue. The battle also greatly damaged the Termi-Nation Bunker suit and the bits of it left over at the battle site got assimilated - the highly modular nature of this suit being incorporated into the design features of Omni-V. When V came online, it was incomplete and so needed further components. In this timeline, Omnitron U had also been destroyed later in an unrelated battle. V managed to find the chassis, stripped out the programming, and created the Omni-Reaper to complemented its incomplete nature. The two of them together comprise Omnitron VI in this timeline.
        • Omnitron-X/U is eventually defeated by Omnitron V and incorporated into the next iteration. The remaining software (plus the memories of the reality that Omnitron-X came from) formed the basis of the Omni-Reaper component of Omnitron VI (Letters Page Interlude 3).
      • RPG - Omnitron U is in rough shape to begin with and the fight with OblivAeon doesn't help, but following that it gets some time to repair/upgrade. When that process is done, it's simply known as Omnitron and remains a hero. The Omnitron IV code is still around, but inactive. Possibilities for future stories.
    • Notes on the diagram in the show notes:
      • Nodes are the points where Omnitron versions are created, X's are destruction.
      • Blue line is the villain versions from the card game timeline.
      • Green line is the alternate reality that we don't really see except for the fact that it's the one that Omnitron X is from.
      • Brown line represents Omnitron X being created, the "Slip Through Time" back to just before the initial battle with Omnitron I in the "main" timeline.
      • Pink line is the return as Omnitron U after the convergence of the blue and brown lines.
      • Red line is the RPG timeline.
      • Orange line is the Tactics timeline, including Omnitron V and the Omni-Reaper.
      • Purple line is the fact that in the RPG timeline, the remnants of Omnitron IV that in Tactics became Omnitron V are still around but haven't become active yet. Plans in the future.

Sources


Osiris/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Parse/References

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Artwork

Confirmed

  • Parse did work for Revo-Corp and Revernant in the past
  • Spite originally was killed by an arrow shot by Parse when she determined Wraith would not be able to do it The Letters Page - The Wraith

To Other Works

  • As a hero that uses archery to fight crime, Parse draws many easy comparisons to DC Comic’s Green Arrow and Marvel Comics' Hawkeye.
  • Parse has Aspergers syndrome, a form of autism. Those who suffer from Apsergers often have difficulty connecting with others, expressing emotions, detecting sarcasm, or understanding what is considered “socially acceptable” in certain public climates. People with Aspergers also demonstrate an enhanced awareness of detail and strong cognitive reasoning, sometimes to the extent of obsessive compulsion. All of these traits apply to Parse’s character.
  • Parse’s calm, direct, matter-of-fact way of speaking is another indicator of Aspergers syndrome. Her somewhat haphazard attire is also an indicator (people with Aspergers syndrome tend to put little focus on personal appearance in favor of other pursuits.)
  • As a hero whose disability has been re-purposed into an advantage, Parse is very similar to Daredevil, a blind hero with hyper-enhanced senses.
  • Parse’s ability to see the weakest point is a power shared by Karnak, a member of Marvel’s Inhumans team.
  • Parse wears a leather jacket over her other clothes, a common “superhero fashion” of the 90’s.
  • "Exploit Vulnerability" shows Parse incapacitating a member of the Crackjaw Crew with a move reminiscent of Mr. Spock's Vulcan nerve-pinch from Star Trek.

Sources


Pike Industrial Complex/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Chairman Episode
    • Chemist Jonathan Pike started a company in the early 1900s - Pike Biotech. The idea being to make lots of stuff to make people healthier and happier. Pharmaceuticals and other medical stuff, not snake oil. He was even fairly philanthropic; making a profit, but not price gouging. The Pike Industries name change happened after some years of success, accompanied by the building of the Pike Industrial Complex. A few years later, in 1924, Jonathan died in his early 50s (kind of weird - he was in good shape). His son, Graham, who was in his 20s steps into the leadership role. Graham is much more selfish, greedy, covetous, envious, etc. The guys confirm outright that Graham poisoned his father.
    • Under his leadership, the prices go up and things become shady. The company makes drugs, but they now also make drugs. Human experimentation is common. Toxic waste/smog from Pike Industrial Complex are polluting Rook City - contributing much to the dank aesthetic that comes to mind when we think of the city (a far cry from Jonathan's vision). The illicit drug market in town is pretty much all his doing and between the drugs being present at all, the dealers on payroll, and the bribes and other corruption involved in keeping the authorities at bay he's contributing to the societal decline as much as the environmental one. He makes a deal with the Overbrook family, who'd fallen out of favor/power, to put them back into power for concessions.
    • The Chairman generates his Elixir here that he bathes in to give him longevity
    • There are still two things that Pike is more hands-on with (having delegated so much of the Organization to his Operative). Pike Industrial Complex itself and it's more secretive Barzakh Wing, an off-the-books offshoot. Part of the processes going on here are dealing with growing human body parts (Biomemetic Plasma Vats being a starting point of that process) with the eventual goal (unrealized in the card game timeline) of growing his own army, filling out the ranks of the Organization with perfectly loyal troops. The Supercooled Trisolvent Vats are used to freeze serums and other materials for later use (such as the elixir that he's got to have under constant production as mentioned earlier). He's got large stockpiles of stuff in a secret bunker.

To Other Works

  • Pike Industrial is similar in atmosphere and content to the Ace Chemical Plant of Batman lore. It was in one of Ace Chemical's buildings that a simple burglar fell into a vat and became the Joker (according to one version of the Joker's "multiple-choice past").

Sources


Plague Rat/References

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Artwork

  • The card "Plague Locus" shows Plague Rat's nest. It is littered with various items from all over the Sentinels universe, including:
    • Chrono Ranger's poncho
    • Spite's hypodermics
    • A golden idol, most likely stolen from Dr. Blake Washington (Ra).
    • One of Gloomweaver's voodoo dolls, shaped like Legacy.
    • A can of soda/beer
    • Three hard to identify glowing orbs.
  • Aside from the title, header, and author credit, the text that makes up the newspaper on Plague Rat's card backs is pure gibberish (specifically [wikipedia:Lorem_ipsum Lorem Ipsum]).
  • * "Shadowy Ambush" features the Chrono Ranger's first appearance on a Sentinels card.

Confirmed

  • Originally a man named Randy "Rot Mouth" Burke. (See Letters Page 26)
  • The rat creature that bit Chrono Ranger's arm off is likely a descendant of Plague Rat, explaining why they are nemeses. (confirmed in Letters Page 25)
  • Between his and Chairman's villain bios in the Rook City rulebook, it can be concluded that the criminal organization that forced him into the sewers was The Chairman's criminal empire. (confirmed in Letters Page 26)

Unconfirmed

  • In the post-apocalyptic future depicted by The Final Wasteland, Plague Rat's descendants have become the dominant species.
  • It is hinted in his character bio that Plague Rat had an encounter with the Chairman.

To Other Works

  • As a mutated human who lives in the sewer, resembles an animal, and feeds on human flesh, Plague Rat is most similar to the Batman villain Killer Croc.
  • The flavor text for "Noxious Bite" is a reference to the video game Resident Evil 2

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page 26 - Plague Rat
    • How is the infection spread - like is it some kind of venom in his bite or a kind of gas or what? It's carried in his saliva, so bites are really bad but even his claws give a chance for infection because there could be some on them from when he licked his fingers while eating earlier or something. He also belches toxic gasses, but that's not part of the infection.
    • Art shows that Legacy, Tachyon, and Ra have been infected and they're pretty powerful, is there any way to resist it? No. That's kind of what makes it so terrible until Revo-Corp makes an antidote (not a vaccine). If you had some method of preventing him from breaking your skin you might be ok, but we see him ripping a Bunker suit apart, so good luck with that.
    • What are the cures? As mentioned, Revo-Corp's cure. One seeming exception is that in the fight where Legacy, Tachyon, and Ra all get infected (in the Megalopolis sewers), Tachyon is able to shake it off herself with a hand-wavy "fast metabolism fought it off" explanation. This is later ret-conned in a La Comodora story when she shows up and takes care of it for her.
    • Why was Chrono-Ranger not infected since he took his arm off? First, that was a Rat Beast in the far future, not Plague Rat himself. He was infected during the fight in the sewer that the Dark Watch heroes came across (see CR's alt-art incap side), though. In both cases CON is able to take care of things (being in the future and having access to Revo-Corp's info on the matter).
    • Are there any long-term effects of the infection for the cured? Not really beyond the expected psychological trauma.
    • How sentient is Plague Rat? Does he have a particular goal? He's pretty much just a beast. He can say English words, but the guys compare it to parrots or "what a dog would say if it could talk" - it's the subconscious remnants of his past humanity that he's retained as these sounds, but he's by no means communicating.
    • In-game, the infection can affect everybody, but does that carry over in the stories to things like Absolute Zero, Omnitron-X, Haka, Dr. Medico, or Dark Watch Mr. Fixer? Haka is susceptible, but the others mentioned aren't (DW Mr. Fixer before being "fixed" by Faultless) as they either don't have blood or aren't "using" it to sustain them.
    • Because of his bestial nature preventing him from recognizing the difference between "hero" and "villain", has he infected any of the latter? Have any villains (Ambuscade or Bugbear for example) hunted him? Other than Revo-Corp has anybody tried to capture him to use as a weapon? Miss Information used him as a distraction in one of her plans, as mentioned previously (although she didn't capture him herself). No primary villains (i.e. those with their own decks) were infected, but some minor ones certainly were during the big infection event. Powers don't really matter when you're infected, though. When the Hippo was infected he wouldn't be a "super rat creature" just a larger one, infected Ra wouldn't be a fiery rat creature, etc. It's really just the closest we get to "zombie-apocalypse" style zombie threats (although "fast zombies") rather than the "voodoo-zombies" like in Gloomweaver stories.
    • When PR was captured, did they try to cure or weaponize the plague so they could then profit by the cure? Definitely onto something - they did develop a cure, but they didn't wind up selling it - it was more of a public-relations coup they went for by giving it away. We don't see them weaponizing the plague in the Multiverse, but they've got it ready somewhere.
    • Do people in-setting call him "Plague Rat" or something else? What did Revo-Corp call him? There are other descriptive terms that probably get thrown around, but "Plague Rat" is the general term. Revo-Corp has a subject number for him: 18-PZ4 (they've got a lot of projects and everything gets this kind of number).
    • Can he recognize people who may have been nice to him (citing Setback interaction text in the Video Game)? Not really. I mean, he has a memory, but he really just wants to bite and rend stuff. Setback wasn't involved in finally freeing him from the handlers either, as mentioned.
    • Does his infection actually turn people into rat beasts or is it just a mental affliction? If the former, how many rat beasts are running around Rook City? If there's a cure, why hasn't it been given to Plague Rat? It does turn them into rat beasts. There weren't many in Rook City to begin with and aren't likely any left now given the limited nature of that story - it's more likely that there are some running around in Megalopolis, but even that's suspect given Revo-Corp's efforts there to dispense the cure. Plague Rat's own mutation was a bit more complex than the infection mechanism and so the cure doesn't work.
    • Does Revo-Corp have any kind of legal claim to Plague Rat? Why does his VotM version not have infection powers? The infection was successfully engineered out of him by Revo Corp. They don't have much of a "legal" claim to him, but he's this large dangerous animal and so it's not really contested that they took him (it's not generally known that he was once a person - sure he's got some humanoid elements, but so do a lot of monsters).
    • In VotM, Plague Rat is Setback's nemesis, does this mean that Chrono-Ranger's gotten over his problem with rats? Chrono-Ranger never shows up in stories involving Plague Rat after he got turned into a "bloodhound" by Revo-Corp (by then he was lost in time and/or tracking down La Capitan). The stories in the "bloodhound" era were focused more on Setback and so that's who wound up as nemesis. However...
    • Chrono-Ranger's status as nemesis was explained by his (not Plague Rat's) motivation based on what happened to him with the Rat Beasts in the future, but then why is Setback the VotM nemesis given that Plague Rat probably couldn't care less and Setback certainly doesn't have a grudge? This is another example of asymmetrical nemeses. Chrono-Ranger wants to kill Plague Rat for specific reasons, but PR doesn't care. Similarly, Setback has no grudge with Plague Rat, but PR is being sent after Setback by his handlers (it's not personal).
    • PR's VotM card's incapacitated side shows him as a human again, how'd he get cured? Uhh... that's not Plague Rat, that's a handler. You can see Plague Rat's tail leading around the corner as he makes his escape.
    • Is the spreading of his plague an intentional goal or incidental? He doesn't care about spreading the plague. He'd probably be less likely to attack/eat another rat beast if anything else was available, but it's not like he wants more around specifically.
    • The art for the handlers are obvious references to a popular "spook-chasing" franchise - are they and the Sentinels brand related? They're not familiar with these "spook chasers" and there's no crossover happening here. The handlers just look like what they look like. They're not afraid of no rats.
    • Is there any chance for him to be cured/returned to some semblance of normality? Let's talk about the future...

Sources


Prime Wardens/References

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Artwork

  • The artwork for the Card Silver Shadow (out of the Argent Adept deck) shows five members of the team, a masked man with a red and gold costume the only still unknown. As of Vengeance his name is known as Captain Cosmic

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • The Prime Wardens bare a lot of resemblance to Marvel's Defenders: As a powerful magic user, and the organizer of the team, Argent Adept fills the role of Doctor Strange. As the Super Strong, Super Tough physical combatant, Haka fills the role of the Hulk. As the Aquatic-themed member, Tempest fills the role of Namor, as a mythical/religious warrior, Fanatic fills the role of Valkyrie, and as a superhero of cosmic power, Captain Cosmic fills the role of the Silver Surfer. Interestingly, this team is even more closely akin to the defenders analogues from Justice League episodes, The Terror Beyond and Wake The Dead: Tempest's lost arm from his incapacitated side, as well as from the Iron Legacy Future, are more reminiscent of Aquaman than Namor, Fanatic is a closer match to Hawkgirl than Valkyrie, and Captain Cosmic, as the last hero, on the team, to be introduced, mirrors Amazo, who appeared in Wake the Dead, but not the previous episode to feature that team, The Terror Beyond.

Sources


Professor Pollution/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Episode 23 - Naturalist
    • One of the things that Professor Pollution is doing, as a side-effect, is leaching toxicity into the dormant Akash'Bhuta (dormant, recovering from the fight with the Prime Wardens). This results in something like a cancer in her which Michael becomes aware of due to his connection to her (from when she cursed him). He communes with her to convince her that she needs to change in order to survive - paralleling his own origin story - and this is what results in the creation of Akash'Thriya and they kind of become an odd "team-up" duo, fighting against Revo-Corp and Plague Rat, Omnitron IV, and others.
  • From Letters Page Episode 30 - Akash'Thriya
    • Professor Pollution happens to be messing up the area that Akash is recovering in. The Naturalist comes to wake her up/help her with the result that she emerges, but not just to move to a different area to slumber some more, but coalescing into this humanoid form and becoming something of an anti-hero as Akash'Thriya and working with Naturalist
  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • Given the backstory, why don't Professor Pollution and Akash'Thriya share a nemesis symbol? Is she a radiation-based mutant? Is she actually a professor or just a fan of alliteration? She's not a professor. The OblivAeon-based heroes all have the OblivAeon as their nemesis because it's the general reason for all of them becoming heroes. While the backstories touch on one another, Professor Pollution isn't really in any fights with Akash'whatever (like how Akash'Bhuta is involved in the Naturalist's backstory, but they're not nemeses). She's highly irradiated and has mutated based on that enough that she can survive it, but Sentinel Comics doesn't really have "mutants" as a specific category.

Sources


Progeny/References

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Confirmed

To Other Works

  • As a near-unkillable engine of destruction bent on the annihilation of everything it sees, Progeny is similar to the DC villain Doomsday. As a shapeshifting creature which can mimic various forms and superpowers, he draws comparisons to Amazo, another DC villain.
  • Progeny is meant to be the forerunner for an even more powerful force, referred to in his character bio as his “Progenitor.” This trait is likely a reference to the Silver Surfer, the herald of Galactus, the Eater of Worlds. The fact that both characters have a silvery continence furthers the comparison.
  • The flavor text of “Beginning of the End” is a reference to the “Death of Superman” comic event, which had Doomsday advancing at a seemingly unstoppable rate towards Superman’s hometown of Metropolis. The flavor text replaces Metropolis with Megalopolis, Legacy’s hometown.
  • As a metallic shapeshifter, Progeny is similar to the T-1000, the villain of the film “Terminator 2.” This is further referenced on the card “Obvious Futility,” which shows Progeny shapeshifting into a form which mimics Mainstay after Mainstay punches it. In “Terminator 2,” the T-1000 could mimic a person after they made physical contact with it.

Sources


Project Cocoon/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Proletariat/References

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Artwork

  • Proletariat is found on Scum and Villainy in the Rook City Environment Deck
  • Proletariat’s costume is meant to evoke the flag of the USSR. Numerous villains from the fifties through the eighties bore this design due to real-world Cold War paranoia.
  • Proletariat’s villain card art is reminiscent of a Soviet propaganda poster.
  • Several Proletariats are being attacked by Knyfe on the card "Amplified Combatant"

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Unconfirmed

  • As Proletariat is a communist themed villain, it is hinted that he may have been created in the early years of Sentinel Comics as the creators of the game, Christopher and Adam, mentioned in their podcast that a lot of the early villains in their comic universe were communists.

To Other Works

  • As a villain with the power to create and re-absorb clones of himself, Proletariat is very similar to the Marvel character Jaime Madrox, the Multiple Man.
  • His being cryogenically frozen by the USSR with plans to thaw him out when needed is similar to the backstory of Marvel's Winter Soldier, Bucky Barnes.

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Quetzalcoatl/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Quetzalcoatl is a figure from Mesoamerican myth. The name means "feathered serpent".

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Ra/References

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Artwork

  • The original Horus of Two Horizons promo incap side shows a bound Ra being watched by Set.
  • The Variant Art Pack Horus of Two Horizons incap side shows Ra speaking to Ammit.
  • The Setting Sun incap side shows Fanatic mourning over Ra's body.
  • "Drawn to the Flame" shows Citizen Dawn weathering a fire blast.
  • "Imbued Fire" shows Legacy with glowing fists, representing that he does Fire damage instead of Melee now.
  • "Scorched Earth" shows Anubis standing on the ground that Ra has caused to burn.

Confirmed

  • Ra has the most nemeses of any Sentinels hero (The Ennead (9), Calypso, Ammit and Anubis.)
  • The new Ra in Tactics is Thiago and the Staff in the Freedom Tower called out to him allowing to bypass security Q&A from Gen Con 2016

Mechanics of these gods in Sentinel Comics:

    • In ancient Egypt, thousands of years ago, there were powerful entities who referred to themselves as gods (identified with these specific gods), although they weren't actually "gods" in the sense that all of these stories about "being the sky" or similar were true, although they certainly encouraged such stories in the populous. Each of them had items tied to their own iconography that eventually became Relics (the Staff of Ra, Atum's Scarab, etc.). These entities had once been human, and were long-lived, but were not truly immortal (most died in combat, but some could still die of old age), and so eventually they're all dead (except one). However, all of their power and knowledge/memories, upon their deaths, would wind up in their Relics (not their minds though, again: Ra and Blake Washington Jr. aren't different people - just that having a ton of extra memories dumped into your head might have an effect on your personality somewhat).
    • The Relics don't automatically impart the power on whoever touches them, though. They have to have some kind of resonance with the person and will kind of "call out" to them ahead of time. This is why notable archaeologist Dr. Blake Washington Jr. picked up this ancient artifact almost immediately instead of following best practices - he was almost compelled to do so.
    • This all fits except for Anubis, who's the original Anubis - part of his powerset as the "gatekeeper of the underworld" was to be immortal and so the original never died. His role was also to be the guard of the underworld and to keep stuff in there from getting out (otherwise we'd have zombies "every damn where") and he wasn't interested in ruling the world, which is probably for the best. Ra manages to convince even him to come help against OblivAeon, and so dies for the first time (leaving the Rod of Anubis around with the rest of the Relics, although most have been scattered and are unaccounted for).

To Other Works

  • Many of Ra's character traits are homages to the Marvel Comics incarnation of Thor, the Norse god of thunder:
    • Both are gods that switch places/identities with mortal men.
    • Both have powers that draw from an elemental source (fire for Ra, thunder for Thor).
    • Both use a mystic relic to channel and enhance their powers (Ra's staff, Thor's Mjolnir hammer.)
    • Both speak in a quasi-Shakespearean manner.
  • "The Staff of Ra" first appeared in the film Raiders of the Lost Ark/ In the movie, main character Indian Jones used it to find the lost Ark of the Covenant.
  • The Cairo Sphinx is famous for missing its nose. The sphinx in the background of "Living Conflagration," however, still has its nose.
  • The flavor text on "Excavation" is an homage to the film Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page 27 - Ra
    • What is the War of Heliopolis arc? It's the story when Ra makes his return as Horus of Two Horizons, taking down the Ennead.
    • Who was the first superpowered human on Earth; we know that Haka has been around a long time, as have the various Virtuosos of the Void, and there are mythological entities like Ra around whose origins are a long time ago, so who was first? Why? The first was a Virtuoso of the Void, but one whose name (and instrument) has been lost to time (more in a few weeks!). Haka was much later by comparison - only a few hundred years old, he was born more recently than La Capitan was. A Virtuoso of the Void has to be around to counter Akash'Bhuta, and so has been around for a long time. Ra and the other mythology-based guys only date back to when those cultures/legends got started.
    • How many wielders of the Staff of Ra have there been/how much control do they have over the Ra personality? First, the "personality" is more of just the result of the wielder's personality now having more knowledge/memories and so is still the same person (as has been mentioned). There have been "several" people to wield it over the centuries during the Egyptian culture, thousands of years ago, but then none at all after that until Blake found it again (then another in the Future section).
    • Can he repair/restore the Staff after it was destroyed by Baron Blade (see Blade's Vengeance card "Vengeful Assault")? The Staff has a physical form, but the power isn't just contained by that physical manifestation - even if the staff was burned and the headpiece melted down, it would re-manifest somewhere. This is also part of the implication of the mechanic in the game that Ra can throw the Staff and then re-summon it. There are things that could theoretically damage this power intentionally, but it's never happened.
    • Guise can use other characters Equipment cards ("Lemme See That"), has he ever used Ra's Staff? What would happen if he did? Does Ra become Blake again if he drops it? Ra can operate without holding the Staff, it's not what gives him his powers on an ongoing basis - it's just a "trigger" to set up the connection. While Blake is Ra (that is, he's the one connected to the power even if he's not actively being Ra at that moment), nobody else can be Ra. The Staff is a focus for him and he likes having/using it, but it's not a necessary condition and it wouldn't impart that power to others, even Guise (especially Guise - the Ra-entity would have no interest in Joe King).
    • Ra is the Sun God, Citizen Dawn gets her power from the light of the sun - what's their relationship like? Did she ever try to recruit him? Would she consider him an equal/rule with him? Citizen would not rule with him, doesn't consider him an equal, doesn't care that he's the "god of the sun" or whatever. They've only met a few times and it's always been antagonistic as neither of them is the type to be subservient to (or even a peer of) anyone else. Possible world in the multiverse where Citizen Dawn approaches him on bended knee to offer him a crown as the ruler of the Citizens of the Sun that he would accept, but there's no way that any Dawn we've seen would do that. They both draw on the sun's power, but that doesn't mean that they'd "get along" because of it - neither really even "gets along" even with people they like.
    • Does Ra ever leave Earth? How would his powers work in space? Has he been to Magmaria where everything's immune to fire damage? How would he do in a fight there? Ra has never left Earth, nor has he been to Magmaria. He draws power from the Sun, but it's interesting to think about if he could do so with other Suns (or, say, on Dok'Thorath where there's more than one). To fight Magmarians, maybe he'd try to use fire to destabilize some rocks that would then fall on them, or maybe somehow draw the heat from them (probably the most effective method) - he's smarter than the average Magmarian, but they're also mostly not very antagonistic.
    • Do the other heroes see him as a god? Why not work with the Prime Wardens? He calls himself one, but it's not like the other heroes worship him - although the positions held on what he is are kind of all across the board. Many think he's just an arrogant jerk. Nightmist has more insight to what's actually going on with him regarding ancient magic. Chrono-Ranger is probably like "Sure." with a shrug.
    • Can Ra fly/levitate or just move around on foot? He can, as a manifestation of "power", kind of levitate, but he can't move around with that.
    • Does Blake Washington Jr. prefer his fish grilled, steamed, or RAw? He prefers it charred.
    • What does the world think happened to Dr. Washington? If the question is about "while he's Ra", then the answer is "nowhere" as he's around just as much as he ever was (which includes going off on expeditions/out of sight for long periods). If the question is "after OblivAeon kills Ra" then it's just assumed that he was one of the millions of casualties due to OblivAeon in general.
    • Does Ra ever get hate-mail from firefighters? If he had an address that he could be reached at, he probably would have.
    • How many iterations of Ra have there been in the "main" Timeline? Just the two "modern" ones.
    • A bio for him mentions that he "trad[ed] his spirit for another chance as a defender of the physical realm", what implications does this have for Ra (or the Ennead) going forward? This was skipped over in the overview:
      • After his initial defeat by the Ennead and his wanderings in the desert, he eventually heads to the Tomb of Anubis. There he calls upon Anubis to make a deal for additional strength. Anubis explains the whole "this is the payment exacted for helping Marty" thing and tells him to take a hike. Ra tries to leave, but Ammit calls him over (pretty funny voice for Ammit at around 57:45) and takes him to her realm and weighs his heart against a feather (this is more Egypt myth stuff) - she only gets to eat his heart if the heart is heavier than the feather of Truth and so far he's coming up on the good side of that arrangement. She wants to make a deal to give him power in exchange for her getting to eat his heart anyway, once his time has come (this scene is the Horus of Two Horizons incap art in the variant art pack).
      • The heart represents some aspects of the "soul" in Egyptian myth - Ammit gets to consume his Ka and Bâ (roughly the "spark" that differentiates the living from the dead and the essence of his personality, respectively - there are three more parts to this "soul" business in Egyptian myth too). In exchange, he must take on two burdens that will allow her to get these two parts of his soul in exchange for the power she'll give him. He thinks he can outsmart her, and so hears her out.
      • First, he must blight a field that many people rely on for food and then he has to turn a desert oasis that people depend on into a lake of fire. He takes some time to think about this, and all of the implications of these actions (i.e. a lot of people will probably die because of this). Being in this spiritual place, he can actually interact with these parts of his soul - he winds up using them to act in the world. His Ka is sent to cause the field to be extra fertile and to bloom overnight, speeding up the harvest, and his Bâ in the form of a hawk to the oasis, where he kills an ox and causes its rapid decay to poison the oasis, but people see this an know that they need to go elsewhere.
      • The next day Ra agrees to Ammit's terms. He goes to this freshly-harvested field and blights it (but given that the harvest is already in, so people won't starve because of it) and to the oasis and does the whole lake of fire thing, but the people are already all gone. He returns to Ammit, thinking he's successfully tricked his way out of this, but finds that now his heart outweighs the feather anyway - while he did what Ammit asked of him, he defrauded her to do so and that trickery is bad. He gets the power anyway, though. This is a major reason that he's "gone gone" after OblivAeon - Ammit ate his soul when he died.
    • On the Ra: Horus of Two Horizons promo card, he looks a lot like Citizen Anvil, is this a coincidence? Anvil has brown hair, Ra has black hair. They're not the same person or related. It's just a coincidence.
    • How many deities from Egyptian mythology are walking around around? We see 100% of the Egyptian deities in the setting. The mummies in the Tomb of Anubis are magically-reanimated corpses related to the fact that they're close to the entrance to the underworld and are being used to guard those gates. That being said, other deities existed, but their Relics are unrecoverable (more next week).
    • How are Ra and Blake Washington separated? Have all bearers of the Staff gone through all three "stages" that Blake did? Does the Staff impart an allergy to shirts? The connection/differences between the Ra/Blake personalities has already been discussed. Every Ra has gone through/will go through the Dawn-Zenith-Sunset sequence. As for shirts, they catch on fire easily and get between him and the sun, so Ra just tends to do without.
    • How did Ra and Fanatic wind up friends considering the differences in theology surrounding them? "Friends" is generous - they're friends but not friendly as they get under each others' skins even if they care about one another. They were both "freak of the week" kinds of characters and wound up in a few stories together in their own books, plus interactions in crossover events. The main crossover for them specifically was the Baptism by Fire limited series. They fight well together even though their very natures contradict one another, but that doesn't get in the way of making out. They are "frenemies with benefits" - not a "couple" as you'd normally think about things.
    • How much of Ra's personality is Ra vs. Blake? Does he seem himself as two entities? Blake is a bit brash already, decisive and reactionary, but his temper is under the surface (as a human adult who's managed to navigate academia), but Ra has no "under the surface" setting and his temper is right out there on display.
    • How does Egypt react to his (and the Ennead's) appearance? Well, Ra's book was never about the political/legal situations, and so it doesn't show up much. Egypt's "official" position is that these aren't really deities and it's not like Ra tries to rule or anything, but Egypt kind of does adopt Ra as a kind of "mascot" for the publicity and his presence does spark an increase in interest in Egyptology. There are stories that involve people starting to worship him, which he doesn't seek out, although he seems pretty cool with it (seeing it as right and proper that people do so, but does have to then deal with the responsibility of having this kind of following.
    • How/why does Ra convince the Ennead and Anubis to work with him? He goes to Anubis first and lays out the whole "end of all reality" problem to get him on board pretty quickly. He and Anubis go around to track them down, but we'll get into the rest of that story in next week's episode given that it's more about the Ennead and their varied reactions.

Sources


Radioactivist/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Unity Episode
    • His odd appearance really is just his gross, orange skin (caused by the nuclear energies that power him) - he was a weird creepy fanboy of the Freedom Five, and became kind of a stalker with regards to Unity once she joined the group. In an event where a bunch of robot drones were attacking a nuclear plant, the FF and Unity went to stop them, he followed them there. He got dosed with a bunch of radiation when the drones caused some part of it to overload. That turned him into the weird creature he is now - for which he blames Unity and the FF.
  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • Did any of Radioactivist's stalkery fan letters and what not make it to Unity, or does the Freedom Five have a robust screening process? His letters and whatnot weren't graphic or anything and weren't really a problem until there were too many of them - the volume was more alarming than anything. He's a creep, but not a pervert. He stopped writing letters after he became the mutated radioactive creature - it's hard to hold a pen when they melt.

To Other Works

  • The Radioactivist is quite reminiscent of Radioactive Man, a villain in the Marvel universe (not to be confused with the character of the same name from “The Simpsons.”) Ironically, as indicated by his name and his flavor text, he seems to have a great dislike for nuclear energy.

Sources


Rahazar/References

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Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • How did Rahazar (and Galactra) get involved with Greazer? Why is he Parse's nemesis? Rahazar is a something like a "minor landed Baron" where his "land" is a planet. Kind of Voss-lite he takes over this planet and sets up a mining operation to send resources back to his own people (he's not important there, he's just a guy who went off and is now sending materials back). He's set himself up as a "ruler" type in his new planet's area and demands tribute of people passing through, etc. - Parse is hanging out with Captain Cosmic at one point and they wind up encountering him. They realize that he's really subjugating the people and stripping the planet and decide to do something. She kind of dismantles his whole operation (because she's able to see the weak points, naturally) and he hates her because of this.

Sources


Ray Manta/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • As a somewhat schlubby-looking man with an animal-themed costume and appropriate name, he could be a reference to Spider-man villain Otto Octavius, Doctor Octopus.

Sources


Re-Volt/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • There are many electricity-based villains that could serve as inspiration, but given the similarities between the Slaughterhouse Six and the Marvel villain group the Sinister Six, it's likely that Re-Volt is a parallel to Spider-man villain Electro.

Sources


Realm of Discord/References

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Artwork

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Dimensions of unrelenting chaos are common locales in comic books. One of the most famous examples is DC comic's version of the Fifth Dimension, which is home to the Superman villain Mister Mxysptlk. John Romita Sr., a quintessential silver-age artist, heavily utilized bizarre mystic landscapes of this sort in the Doctor Strange comic; time and gravity anomalies, ribbons of land stretching through starry voids, and phantasmal visions were all common tropes in such settings.

Sources


Revenant/References

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Confirmed

  • Revenant, along with Setback were the two earliest ideas for superheroes and villains by Adam Confirmed Gathering of Heroes 2014
  • Revenant is the CEO of Revo-Corp in power armor Letters Page 3.
  • It is implied in Letters Page 3 starting at the 21:18 mark that the suit worn by Revenant is a later iteration of the Battle Suit created by Baron Blade and then was confirmed in Letters Page 32

To Other Works

  • Revenant is named after a monster from European folklore. The creatures in the original tales were corpses that rose from their graves to seek vengeance on those that wronged them in life. They were often impossible to kill outside of strange/magical means. Aside from his flavor text, not much about the armored/robotic, energy-blasting, RevoCorp-owning Setback nemesis bears a resemblance to his namesake.

Sources


Revo-Corp/References

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Confirmed

  • Revo Corp has pieces of Omnitron within it's storage.
  • Benchmark is an employee of Revo-Corp
  • Parse had worked for Revo-Corp and Revernant before getting her powers
  • Baron Blade founded RevoCorp before he was arrested due to the Mad Bomber Blade events Letters Page Episode 3 and it was initially tasked with the development of the serum that gave him powers leading up to the Vengeance events.

To Other Works

  • Revo-Corp is similar to Roxxon Corp in Marvel Universe. They're big corporations with some shady ties.

Sources


Rockstar/References

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Confirmed

  • Rockstar, Megan Lee doesn't appear in the Mist Storm Universe.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • From The Letters Page Episode 74
  • Who tends to take the leadership role and why? The easy answer is "not Aeon Girl or Muerto". Headlong tends to be the most decisive. Rockstar wants to be the frontman and tends to lead with her face. Muse isn't really a leader, but she's the "soul" or "backbone" of the team.
  • How old is everybody? Rockstar and Headlong are seniors in high school. Muse is a freshman. Muerto finished one year of high school and then died. Aeon Girl is a number of months old, but presents as a teenager.
  • Do Muse and Rockstar fight crime in heels? Isn't that uncomfortable/dangerous? Muse doesn't do a lot of the running/jumping style of heroics, and Rockstar wears the sorts of shoes she would wear on stage (and has the whole rock protection thing going on in the first place). Adam takes issue with the idea that heels are always going to interfere with movement - look at dancers who can move just fine in heels.
  • Is Rockstar an actual rock star? Is that a star tattoo? Is she seeing anyone? She wants to be a rock star. It's glitter makeup (and she changes both that and her hair tips all the time). She's not seeing anyone currently.
  • Does Rockstar manifest her powers through music or is she just a rocker who got powers? The latter (although note that she's a wannabe rocker - and to address a common question, music has nothing to do with her powers). She wants to be a guitarist for a rock band, but is also not really putting any real work in towards that end goal (say, by practicing guitar or writing songs).
  • Did she write and anthem for the team? Not yet (definitely thinking about talking about working on it, though).
  • What kind of music does Rockstar like? What kind of rocks does her power make? She makes crystalline things typically (she can make cruder types of rock if she wants, but she typically wants to make shiny/flashy rocks that people will talk about later). Musically, she likes stuff on the glam/pop continuum of rock (not heavy metal or classic rock). Her music player will have a lot of modern pop, pop punk, etc.

Sources


Rook City(Environment)/References

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Artwork

Confirmed

To Other Works

  • Rook city is an almost exact recreation of Gotham City, the gritty and dismal home of Batman.
  • The backs of the Rook City cards show a red letter "C" spray painted on the city's "welcome" sign, making it read "Crook City." (Originally the community was founded as Overbrook City.) With the exception of a few background lights, which are also in red, the entire picture is in black and white. This is very evocative of artist Frank Miller, who wrote and drew the famous crime noir comic "Sin City" in just such a way. The setting of the story, Basin City, was commonly known as "Sin City" by it's residents, partially due to it's overwhelming crime rates, and partially because the "B" and "A" on the city's welcome sign were crossed out with spray paint.
  • Tony Taurus and Dr. Tremata are both textbook examples of the "lone upholder of justice" trope. Commissioner Gordon of Batman lore is another such character.
  • Tony Taurus' last name is evocative of the Minotaur, a bull/human hybrid that patrolled the maze of Tartarus and guarded it from intruders. Similarly, Tony Taurus patrols the corrupted streets of Rook City as a private investigator.
  • The art for "Blighted Streets" shows a wealthy family being accosted by a mugger. This is reference to the traumatic event that shaped young Bruce Wayne into Batman.
  • The gargoyle on "Falling Statuary" greatly resembles Etrigan the Demon, a character created by legendary comic artist Jack Kirby.
  • The combination of the name of the bar, The Wretched Hive, and the card it appears on, "Scum and Villainy", is a reference to Obi-wan Kenobi's description of the port of Mos Eisner in the original Star Wars film.

Sources


Ruin/References

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Artwork

  • The Argent Adept is shown freezing Ruin's head on his card "Scherzo of Frost and Flame."
  • Ruin is the Nemesis whom V5 Baron Blade summons on his card "A Taste of Vengeance".

Confirmed

  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • In Gloomweaver's episode, it was mentioned that he had sent Ruin after Nightmist, but Ruin sensed the Virtuoso of the Void's presence and went after him instead. However, since Nightmist does a power-up-in-the-Void thing, wouldn't he have been attracted to that as well? Argent Adept is more innately attuned to the Void rather than Nightmist simply siphoning power from it and so Ruin would key into that more easily - he also just encounters AA before Nightmist at all. Also, Nightmist doesn't really do her Void thing until after Vengeance anyway.
  • Notes from Letters Page Episode 13 - Gloomweaver
    • Next major event isn't even involving GloomWeaver directly: During Vengeance, another Realm of Discord entity is brought forth. Ruin was one of those beings that GloomWeaver had defeated during the process of becoming ruler there, but is now just a lackey. GloomWeaver sends him in, basically, as a proxy to get in on the fun the other villains were having and to beat up Nightmist.
    • Stuff about Ruin: was originally an entity of the Void and gets power from there. Was a small fish in the Void, but a big fish in the RoD until GloomWeaver took over. Ruin gets sidetracked in the real world, though. He was sent after Nightmist, but runs into Argent Adept (you know, the "Virtuoso of the Void") and goes after him instead. Defeating AA and taking his power would give him a shot at taking down GloomWeaver back in the RoD later. More in the Argent Adept episode, but short version is that AA has no trouble obliterating Ruin entirely.

Sources


Ruins of Atlantis/References

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Confirmed

To Other Works

  • Atlantis is a location in both the DC and Marvel universe. In DC, it is the home of Aquaman. In Marvel, it is home to Prince Namor. Fittingly, the ocean-based hero of the Sentinels universe, Tempest, is tied to the city's history.

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Sanction/References

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Artwork

Sanction

Celestial Tribunal

  • The holographic images pictured on “Found Wanting” display Dr. Tremata and the Fence. Both are shown with a projectile (a dart and an arrow respectively) jutting from the left side of their chests. The human heart is usually located on the left side of the chest. It is very probable that both of these characters were killed by such an injury. Based on the facial structure and hairline, the silhouetted figure on the third image to the right may be Tony Taurus.
  • Relating to the above, the villain accused for the assaults/murders depicted on “Found Wanting” is referred to by the flavor text as “Heartbreaker.” Based on the methods of dispatch the holograms depict, it is clear that his name is a pun on his method of killing. The fact that heartbreaker uses various thrown projectiles to attack may make him an homage to the Marvel villain Bullseye.
  • "Character Witnesses" shows the Dark Watch team coming to the defense of Harpy (in her solo hero costume, rather than either her Villain or Dark Watch costumes).
  • "Called to Judgement" shows Sky-Scraper as a defendant and Tempest as a witness.
  • "Paragon of Sentience" shows the Celestial Adjudicator observing The Scholar and Guise in a battle withAeon Men.
  • "Representative of Earth" shows Omnitron-X being watched by the Celestial Adjudicator and Celestial Executioner.

Confirmed

Sanction

Celestial Tribunal

  • The tribunal was the only deck in SOTM that can draw cards from decks not used in the current in-play game (“Representative of Earth”). Until the Guise variant Completionist Guise was released.

To Other Works

Sanction

Celestial Tribunal

  • A court of powerful aliens judging humanity is a well-known science fiction staple. Perhaps the most popular example is the 1987 pilot episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation “Encounter at Farpoint,” in which the human race was judged by an omnipotent race called the Q. In the episode, a small handful of humans were selected to represent the entire species, an M.O. shared by the Tribunal.
  • The spaceship which houses the Celestial Tribunal is shaped like a massive sword. This may be a reference to the Sentient World Observation and Response Department (S.W.O.R.D.) from Marvel comics, a global defense group dedicated to protection from extraterrestrial threats. Additionally, the tribunal ship bears a strong resemblance to S.W.O.R.D.’s orbital base of operations, the Peak.
  • The font for the Celestial Tribunal card backs is nearly identical to the one used in the 2011 superhero film Green Lantern.

Sources


Sara Scott/References

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Confirmed

  • Killed by Spite

Sources


Scholar/References

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Confirmed

Sources


Sentinels/References

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Artwork

  • The Idealist's "Incapacitated" side shows her disintegrating into small square pieces. This is a reference to Marvel's 2005 "House of M" crossover event, in which the insane ex-heroine Scarlet Witch rewrote reality to serve her desires. Whenever the Scarlet Witch "unmade" something in her created world it disintegrated in the same way.
  • Mainstay's "Incapacitated" side shows him being held prisoner in The Block (the pink energy "bars" are similar to the ones seen on The Block cards "Lock Down" and "Defensive Displacement").
  • Writhe's "Incapacitated" side is an homage to a famous Spider-Man cover which shows Venom besieged in a church bell tower. It is also possible that the Venom-like creature shown attacking Setback on "Cause and Effect" is actually a berserk Writhe, and that these pictures come from the same story arc.
  • The boy pictured on "Human Shield" may be Thiago from the Spite card "Potential Sidekick." He and Mainstay appear to be under fire from some of the Chairman's hit-men.
  • The female villain of the Crackjaw Crew (pictured on "Sentinels Tactics") is in a wheelchair almost identical to both Charles Xavier's (aka Professor X) in the 90's X-Men cartoon. It is also similar to the one driven by Alistaire Smythe in the Spider-Man cartoon from the same decade.
  • The card "Sentinels Tactics" is likely a reference to the strategy game of the same name published by Greater Than Games.
  • As a symbol for medicine and healing, the Caduceus emblazoned on Dr. Medico's chest is actually incorrect. The Caduceus, representing the staff of the Greco-Roman messenger god Hermes, is a symbol for commerce and trade, not healing. The Caduceus is often confused with the Rod of Asclepius, an actual medical symbol which features a single snake coiling around a wooden rod.
  • The giant robot projection pictured on "Dark Delusions" is a parody of the Megazord from the 1993 Americanized Super Sentai show "Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers".
  • The Idealist is standing next to the Dark Watch version of Expatriette on "Aura of Vision".

Confirmed

  • Dr. Medico is one of two openly known LGBT heroes in the Multiverse. The other is Tachyon.
  • The Sentinels are the only SotM heroes to have a Setup card.
  • Dr. Medico absorbed the second form of Skinwalker Gloomweaver[1] into his OblivAeon Shard and it was a major factor leading into his Malpractice variant. In the Tactics timeline this lead to Gloomweaver taking over his body. In the RPG timeline Gloomweaver was exorcised from Dr Medico early on but his fate was left unknown.

To Other Works

  • As a quartet of superheroes, the Sentinels draw easy comparisons to Marvel's Fantastic Four. However, as a team composed of people from disparate walks of life who are pulled together by circumstance, they draw more comparisons to the Avengers, another Marvel staple.
  • The individual Sentinels seem to embody the popular characteristics of comic book characters from different decades:
    • As an energy being with a simple design and a domino mask, Dr. Medico evokes the Silver Age Green Lantern, aka Hal Jordan. Hal Jordan was introduced in the 50's and became increasingly popular in the sixties and seventies.
    • The burly, biker-grunge styled Mainstay recalls numerous anti-heroes from the 80’s, most notably DC's Lobo.
    • The young, plucky Idealist is reminiscent of the Power Pack, a team of child superheroes who also hailed from the 80's. They are a part of the Marvel universe.
    • Writhe, with his spectral appearance, fedora, and shadow powers, is similar to numerous characters from the nineties and early 2000's, most notably DC's The Shade, an enemy of the hero Starman.
  • Dr. Medico is the adoptive father of The Idealist along with his husband Caleb.
  • As a hero made of pure power and energy that can heal people, Dr. Medico is similar to the New 52 version of DC's Captain Atom.
  • Dr. Medico seems to change color when he uses his healing powers. On "Restorative Burst", which pictures him healing Writhe, he is dark orange rather than his usual bright yellow.
  • Mainstay has a heart shaped tattoo on his right shoulder with the word "Ma" written inside, a stereotype of the "tough guy with a heart of gold" character archetype.
  • The Idealist's ability to create mental energy projections is evocative of DC's Green Lantern.
  • The Idealist is the youngest hero in the Sentinels universe.
  • Power wise and character wise, Writhe is an amalgamation of many different famous comic characters:
    • As a thief who gained shadow powers from technology, he is similar to the DC villain Shadow Thief.
    • As a shadowy ex-villain who gave up crime thanks to the intervention of a hero with light-based powers, Writhe is similar to the Shade, one of Starman's former foes.
    • His ability to entrap enemies in the shadows of his trench coat calls to mind Cloak from the Marvel duo of Cloak and Dagger.
    • Writhe's fedora, jacket, and shadowy presence evoke the classic comic/radio character The Shadow.
  • The card "Good Hero – Bad Hero" is a parody of the classic "Good Cop – Bad Cop" dichotomy.

Sources


Sergeant Steel/References

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Confirmed

Unconfirmed

  • It's implied, but not outright stated in Bunker's episode of the Letters Page, that the Mega-gunner and Arsonator characters (and by implication, other members of Sgt. Steel's team) were originally mercenaries that Bunker had fought in his solo, overtly military comic series before making the transition to superheroics when he joined the Freedom Five.

To Other Works

  • The Sergeant Steel and his group are similar to Sergeant Fury and the howling commandos

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page 22 - F.I.L.T.E.R.:
    • F.I.L.T.E.R. seems to have started as a benign "Men in Black" organization, but during the prison riots the officers fire on heroes there to help and Sgt. Steel will work with villains, at this point is F.I.L.T.E.R. evil? How about Steel himself? If there's a prison riot, and you're part of the fighting but aren't officers yourselves, the guards aren't likely to take kindly to you no matter what the situation is. Sergeant Steel is working against a hero, and therefore might qualify as a "villain" by certain definitions, but he's also working under orders. Can an organization, as opposed to the people in it, be "evil"? They're not strictly speaking a "hero team", they're locking up villains but that's more for their benefit than for some societal good, but they are keeping bad guys locked up
    • F.I.L.T.E.R. Spy (from Time Cataclysm) looks like the Espionagent (from Sergeant Steel's deck) - are they the same person? Does this mean that F.I.L.T.E.R. was caught up in the Cataclysm or were they just exploiting it (or even behind it)? OblivAeon caused the Time Cataclysm. The Spy and Espionagent aren't the same individual as they're the "same" person from different realities (one of the rare exceptions mentioned in the previous answer) and they get sent on disparate missions to keep things from getting too confusing. The Time Cataclysm touches all environments, including the Block.
    • Is Sgt. Steel from the main timeline or K.N.Y.F.E.'s home timeline? How about the rest of the team? Is F.I.L.T.E.R. generally from a mix of realities or was K.N.Y.F.E. an exception? Sgt. Steel is from a timeline other than both K.N.Y.F.E. and the main reality. The squad are from a mix of realities, too, but it's not like they're all explicitly from unique timelines (the Arsonator and Mega-Gunner are from the main timeline and had fought Bunker all the way back in his debut comic - see the cover art on the 3rd page of the pdf). F.I.L.T.E.R. personnel started as being from the main timeline, but has expanded into a mix since they found the Block.
    • In Sgt. Steel's deck we get to know his team and that they're specific characters - how does one get onto the team? Do they need to replace people periodically (supposing a high turnover rate due to getting the tough jobs), how often? Would we see the recruitment happen in F.I.L.T.E.R. comics? Are members characters that readers would already be familiar with? This team was formerly K.N.Y.F.E.'s team - Jack Steel, Bomb Specialist, Arsonator, Espionagent, Field Inventor, Infiltrationist, and a few others (not the same as the rest of the team as shown in the deck as Steel added Sharpshooter, Mega-Gunner, and Battle Medic to the team once he assumed command). Arsonator knew Mega-Gunner and got him recruited, but generally you get consideration for a slot for past accomplishments (especially wet-work jobs).
    • Since Steel is a "Vengeance-Style" team villain deck, does he work with other villains considering that he's mostly out to get K.N.Y.F.E. specifically and they seem to capture her on their own? They eventually got her without help, but that doesn't mean that they didn't try to get help prior to that. On Earth they worked with Miss Information, offering to help against the Freedom Five in exchange. They hired Greazer to help once they're chasing her out in space (which did not go well for Greazer). [I'll also point out that it's mentioned that they work with Biomancer and Citizens Hammer and Anvil when they're going after Visionary back in the Expatriette episode

Sources


Set/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Setback/References

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Artwork

  • The art on Setback's incapacitated side is a reference to this picture of Spider-man when he decided to give up the life of a superhero in the "Spider-Man No More" story in Amazing Spider-man #50.
  • Many members of the Slaughterhouse Six on “High Risk Behavior” are similar to members of Spider-Man’s rogues gallery, including an Electro and Vulture lookalike (Re-volt and Desert Eagle). Glamour, as pictured on both that card and “Uncharmed Life”, resembles Iron Man villainess Madame Mask.
  • "Cash Out" shows a confrontation between Kismet and Setback in a casino, indicating that this is their first confrontation as adults as mentioned in the Kismet Letters Page Episode. Note the precarious chandelier above Kismet - it's about to fall on her, which leads to her capture and imprisonment.

Confirmed

  • Setback and his Vengeance Nemesis Revenant were some of Adam's earliest ideas for a hero and villain Conversation at the Gathering of Heroes 2014, Vengeance Release Party
  • Setback is the first Promo card to be released before the hero actually was - Officially his Promo Power was known before his actual power or deck mechanics were.
  • On the back of Dark Watch Setback's card, his incapacitated self involves a picture of him distraught while holding a dead or wounded Dark Watch: Expatriette. This seems to imply that Setback and Expatriette have some sort of relationship. Likewise the back of her Dark Watch card has her jumping in front of an explosion to protect him. Confirmed
  • His costume and Luminary's outfit are inspired by and are reflections of Legacy's costume Letters Page Episode 3

To Other Works

  • As a hero with an unprofessional attitude and powers that (for the most part) negatively affect him, Setback is evocative of the numerous subversive meta-commentary superheroes of modern comics.
  • As a bumbling, oafish superhero that is frowned upon by other superheroes, Setback is similar to DC Comics’ Booster Gold. Both characters also share similarities in their costumes.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page Episode 6
    • Question time:
      • What was the plan for Setback prior to Kismet (referring to the fact that Kismet was a from the Create a Villain contest - this question asked by her creator)? Christopher and Adam have a whole stable of unused characters, stemming from RPG games they've played or comics that Adam made over the last 2 decades. Setback was one of these. They assigned Kismet to him as nemesis for thematic reasons but their plan was that no matter who won the contest they had characters available to match up with them. First few expansions had lots of character cameos from later releases who they didn't necessarily think they'd wind up getting to make - even getting to Shattered Timelines was surprising.
      • Where did the idea for him come from? Based on a real friend of theirs named Pete - lots of bad breaks but things works out in the end, staying optimistic throughout.
      • Did he debut in comics as Blade's test-subject or had he been around for a while? That first comic shows his life with all the bad breaks leading up to his being a test subject, as mentioned earlier. Flashback to high school explaining the luck once Kismet shows up. The invented comics-industry reason is that he was originally written to just be this extremely unlucky guy (not even part of his "power set", just as the chain of events that led him to be in this situation) and the curse thing was a retcon by later writers.
      • He seems like his his comic would be pretty wacky, but he's connected to Expatriette who is not - does his tone shift depending on which title he's appearing in? They don't consider him to be a comedy character - not wacky like Guise's would be. Slapstick things happen, but they're not the focus as he takes his role as a hero seriously. That being said, there is likely to be differences depending on the title (he'd still be lighthearted in a Dark Watch issue, but not as much as he would be in Freedom Five). In the grittier titles he's a "source of light in darkness" - he's not comic relief, but he's the lightest aspect of the book.
      • Why did the serum work on him? The luck. No other reason. Too early in the testing process to expect it to do anything.
      • What was the extent of what the serum did for him? Hard to measure. As a rule of thumb, think "half as [strong/fast/tough/whatever]" as Legacy. That's still really impressive. Initially they thought of having a fluctuating strength component, but they decided the luck thing was more interesting and so they dropped it.
      • Why doesn't he need frequent injections of the serum like Blade does? Because it worked. Blade's version is a work-around/hack to get something out of it.
      • Does his bad luck ever get him down or frustrate him? For most of his arc, he doesn't really recognize that he's got this weird luck thing. He's very laid back and optimistic. Not to say that he doesn't get sad when something bad happens, but he doesn't blame some external "luck" thing, it's just life.
      • On his original incap art, he's thrown away his costume. What's the story there? Pretty early in his story (Freedom Five trainee phase). During a fight, he takes a hit that sends him across the room and into the janitor, Larry Hillburn, an older man who gets badly injured. Setback sees this as his fault, and decides that him being around and effecting other people instead of just himself is a problem and so quits. A few months later, Miss Information has trapped the Freedom Five in their HQ, but Larry slips out unnoticed and goes to Pete's apartment to ask him to help. Pete's very apologetic about what happened, but Larry explains that he doesn't blame him and thought that he had helped. Larry had saved the costume from the dumpster too, although it still smells bad. He goes to fight Miss Information and almost immediately falls into a trap, although one set for Tyler Vance that he's able to break. This causes an explosion, which releases the other heroes who then save the day.
      • Where did he get the suit? Designed for him specifically? How often does he need a new one? Freedom Five have an in-house costume fabrication thing. Tachyon would be involved in the science of them, but not the fashion - his is essentially just spandex and so she'd have little influence in his (costume stuff to be discussed later - reference to RPG info, I'm assuming as player character info on how "costumes" make sense in-setting).
      • Is the person in the Revenant armor somebody who knew Pete? Revenant is the CEO of Revo-Corp. He knows who Pete is and the whole incident with the serum, but Pete unlikely to recognize him out of comic. More about him in the Revo-Corp podcast (so get your Revo-Questions in!). He'd have been recognized by comic readers when unmasked, but he's nobody else that we've seen in the SotM game.
      • Is there a point where other characters notice his luck as a superpower? Great question: brings up lots of story stuff:
        • First character to notice his luck is Zhu Long. After recovering the revived Mister Fixer, the Dark Watch team argue on whether they should return to the Temple to see if there's something that can be done to restore him to his old non-bitter self. Setback decides to just go on his own and just walks right into the place, fights some ninjas, stumbles into a vat of poison and knocks himself out. Zhu Long is a master of a lot of ancient evil magic and can see the "general aura of unluck that's pervasive" as well as the "spikes of extremely good luck" and manipulates him. He uses a kind of mind control to order Setback around and also manipulates the luck stuff so that the bad luck is always facing out and the good luck inwards - making Setback very dangerous. He's more or less a match for the remaining 3 members of Dark Watch on his own while in this state, but Mister Fixer is able to stymie him long enough for Nightmist to be able to undo the magic that Zhu Long had done.
        • That means that Nightmist is now also aware of it and offers later to manipulate the luck aura for him too, but he's still not sold on the fact that this is a real thing anyway and so declines to have anybody messing with him magically.
      • Does Pete have any feeling/idea of when his luck is about to change? Kind of. He probably could key into it if his general outlook on life would allow him to do so. His general optimism kind of blinds him to the fact that something good is about to happen since he pretty much always expects good things to happen.
      • Any reasons for nemesis status with Kismet beyond the "luck" theme? The dating thing from high school to start, but there are parallel backstory reasons following that to explain it too. More next week (Christopher has to check himself from launching right into it anyway).
      • How often do his fights with villains end in a draw? Never. He probably loses more than other heroes, though.
      • How does Pete's family feel about him (comparisons with the Parson and Cohen families)? He's told his mom and sister and they're proud of him. He kind of turned into a screw-up halfway through high school, but he's doing good stuff now. Always tries to make it home for holidays [insert series of unfortunate events].
    • Expatriette-centric questions (5 narrowed down from like 20):
      • How did they get together considering their disparate backgrounds/outlooks on life? As per the Expatriette episode, he accidentally got hit by a shock round. He was kind of in Freedom Five-sidekick mode at the time. While she's in town they got to know each other, but she was still dealing with her own stuff. He wore her down eventually with his humanity. He thought she was really cool, on top of things, and found her fascinating. They're a "working" couple - he likes helping people and she likes working. He was a big influence on her in terms of "helping people by shooting".
      • What's she see in him; he doesn't seem like her type? He's "not her type" in that he's not like her, and that's what makes him her type. She probably didn't have a type before. She admires his optimism while she had been more of a nihilist/fatalist prior to meeting him. The relationship brings both of them closer to "center". They're a fantastic influence on each other.
      • What kind of living situation? They both have their own places - he has a nice apartment, she has a survival bunker safehouse (or a series of them). That's true for the card game - Tactics they're always on the move (together) and RPG they're living together and are even more of a team.
      • How much does his luck impact his romantic life with her? Dating more challenging/interesting. They got off on a good start. She's aware of what happens around him. She's very rational and knows it's not something he can control.
      • What's a typical date night like? They don't really date like most people. They go out on patrol and that's kind of their "dates". There aren't many trips to fancy restaurants. Setback instigates them occasionally, but then Ambuscade happens to be there or something. They've probably had a single-digit number of dates with minimal bad things happening.

Sources


Shrieker/References

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Confirmed

  • First incarnation of the Freedom Four was back near the beginning of comics "Silver Age" (which would put it somewhere in the vicinity of 1956) - Legacy, Wraith, the original Absolute Zero (Henry Goodman), and the Shrieker.
  • Legacy is pretty similar then to now - kind of a "timeless" character. As is the Wraith (she's maybe somewhat softened over time, likely a result of just getting to know her as a person over the years rather than a corporate decision to try to do so). Absolute Zero, as mentioned previously, was there to try to boost his popularity, which didn't work. The Shrieker had been around a while at this point, but she was also there largely as an attempt to promote her.

Sources


Shu/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Shuen Zhang/References

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Confirmed

  • Part of Mr. Fixer's books:
    • One-shot comic issue comes out that gives the backstory of one Harold Robert Walker. Born blind in Rook City. He doesn't remember his parents, he's barely surviving on the streets as a kid. He's found by Shuen Zhang, a martial arts master who takes him in. The master has been on an endless worldwide pilgrimage to places of great suffering as part of his own philosophy to try to alleviate suffering. Shuen Zhang sees Harry's suffering, but also his strength and great inner peace and so asks Harry to come with him to be taken care of, but also training.
    • This training starts with turning his "inner eye" in on himself, understanding who he himself is and through that understanding he understands the world around him. They describe it as him projecting his aura out and that aura interacting with the world around him is what allows him to perceive the world without his eyes. It's not a matter of his other senses being superhuman, just that he has this extra ability to perceive the auras of people and things around him.
    • Harry travels with Shuen Zhang for around 15 years, traveling around the world and easing suffering. Eventually, when he's in his 20s he decides that he needs to return to Rook City as he has a connection to it and recognizes that there's a lot of suffering to be mitigated there. Master Zhang is fine with this and lets him go. Harry returns to Rook City as Black Fist.

Sources


Silver Gulch 1883/References

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Confirmed

  • Before his fateful encounter with a time portal, Chrono-Ranger was the sheriff of Silver Gulch.
  • Canonically the heroes who ended up in Silver Gulch 1883 are Argent Adept, Nightmist, Tempest, Mr. Fixer, Wraith and Ra. Per Christopher in Fifth Reveal: La Capitan

To Other Works

  • The wild west is a common time period for comic book time travel stories. This is because wild west stories dominated the comics market in the forty's and early fifties, leaving numerous memorable characters for potential crossovers.
  • A band of outlaw brothers, such as the Hayes Brothers, is a common wild west trope.

Sources


Sky-Scraper/References

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Artwork

  • The Incapacitated side of Skyscraper’s “Huge” character card depicts her being buried alive in a massive grave while tied up in chains. This is a reference to Marvel’s 2006 crossover event “Civil War.” In issue #4 of the series, the size-changing hero Black Goliath is killed by a cyborg clone of Thor. His corpse, which is now permanently gigantic, is later wrapped up in a colossal tarp and chains and laid to rest in an over-sized burial plot. Aside from the change of characters and a few minor details, Skyscraper’s Incapacitated portrait is identical to the aerial-view panel of Black Goliath’s funeral in that issue.
  • The device attached to Deadline’s arm on “Cortex Hyperstimulator” is nearly identical to the electronic scrambling device used by Captain America in “Civil War” #3. In that particular issue, Captain America hid the device in his hand just before a truce handshake with Iron Man. As soon as it touched Iron Man’s armor, it scrambled his armor’s circuitry and incapacitated him. This prompted a battle between Iron Man's and Captain America’s respective factions, a battle which culminated in the death of Black Goliath, one of Skyscraper’s archetypes.
  • The art of “Catch a Ride” shows Parse about to fire an arrow that has a tiny Skyscraper clutching its arrowhead. Hawkeye and Ant-Man from the Marvel universe are well-known for using this particular team attack.
  • Sky-Scraper features a significant amount of villains within the art of her deck. Osiris and Nuit of The Ennead on "Compulsion Canister", Deadline on "Cortex Hyperstimulator", Plague Rat on "Neutralizing Resonator", Tantrum on "Proportionist", La Capitan on "Rebounding Debilitator", Akash'Bhuta on "Colossal Left Hook", Mdaj from the Tomb of Anubis on "Agression Modulator", Kaargra Warfang on "Tectonic Chokeslam", and Baron Blade with Proletariat on "Undetectable Relinking".

Confirmed

  • Sky-Scraper was first discovered on Tantrum as the additional effect, before she was announced.
  • First appeared on The Dreamer in the card "Projected Paralysis."

To Other Works

  • As a hero who can change sizes, Skyscraper is analogous to several superheroes, primarily Ant-Man/Yellow Jacket (Marvel), Black Goliath (Marvel), Atom Smasher (DC), and Apache Chief (DC). As a sneaky hero who uses her small size for infiltration and sabotage, she draws comparison to the second incarnation of Ant-Man (Scott Lang), and the Atom (DC).
  • Most of Skyscraper’s flavor texts suggest that she doesn’t speak English very well. This would make sense, as her bio states that she arrived on Earth only recently.
  • The pose on Extremist Sky-Scraper (Huge) card is probably a homage to the Female Titan in Attack on Titan (Anime) - there is a scene with the exact same pose and twirling bit.

Sources


Slaughter-House Six/References

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Art References

Unconfirmed

Confirmed

  • First seen in the Challenges document, as a comic book cover

Reference

  • The Slaughter-House Six are likely an homage to the original lineup of Marvel's Sinister Six villain team, which was composed of villains from the Spider-Man comics: Doctor Octopus (Ray Manta), Kraven the Hunter (Ambuscade), Mysterio (Glamour), Vulture (Desert Eagle), Sandman (Magman), and Electro (Re-Volt).

Spite/References

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Artwork

  • Spite is seen on the card Surprise Shopping Trip in the Time Cataclysm environment deck
  • The victims on the card Collateral Damage are Wraith's friends/comic supporting-cast members Sara Scott and Eduardo López.

Confirmed

  • Spite originally was killed by an arrow shot by Parse when she determined Wraith would not be able to do it (Letters Page Episode 3).

To Other Works

  • Spite reverse side could be a reference to the end of the 1988 Anime movie "Akira" the appearence is similar to characters Tetsuo Shima monsterous transformation, interestingly Tetsuo and Spite's transformations are reversed Tetsuo transforms when he runs out of 'drugs' and Spite transforms when he has all of them
  • Spite is very similar to Bane, an adversary of Batman. Both characters are homicidal, muscular masked men who amplify their strength with drugs. Spite's chaotic nature and reckless behavior, on the other hand, are traits shared with Batman's arch nemesis, the Joker.
  • Spite's line in the flavor text of "Innocent Bystander" is nearly lifted verbatim from one of Joker's lines in the film The Dark Knight.
  • Spite's hoody/mask combination is similar to Michael Myers in the rebooted version of the film Halloween.
  • Spite's appearance on his "Drug Wracked Monstrosity" side is reminiscent of numerous monsters from the Resident Evil video game franchise, most notably the Tyrant.

Sources


Stuntman/References

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Artwork

  • The events pictured on "Personal Cloaking Device" are followed up on Haka's "Haka of Shielding" card.
  • "Sonic Mine" is the Argent Adept's first appearance.

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Ambuscade's character seems to be an amalgamation of three popular Marvel characters: Kraven the Hunter, Cable, and Gambit. Like Kraven, Ambuscade is a superhuman hunter that preys on other super-humans. Like Cable, he has a robotic shape-shifting arm and a massive stockpile of guns at his disposal. Like Gambit, he can charge items with energy and make them explode.
  • Ambuscade's cloaking ability is an homage to the Predator franchise.
  • The "Quick Stim Patch" is very similar to the "slapper" drug patches featured in Batman Beyond.
  • Ambuscade's "Trap" cards function very similarly to the famous Yu-Gi-Oh' card, "Parasite Paracide." Interestingly, the Yu-Gi-Oh card game also has "Trap" cards.
  • Wearing a mask to hide his "disfigurement" as Ambuscade is similar to what Fantastic Four villain Doctor Doom, Iron Man villain Madam Masque, and Batman villain Black Mask have done to hide their disfigurements.

Sources


Stygian/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Tachyon/References

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Artwork

  • The shadowy character that Tachyon is punching on "Supersonic Response" is Writhe, one of the Sentinels. Why she is punching a fellow hero has not been revealed. It is possible that Tachyon fought Writhe during his short-lived criminal career.
  • Tachyon uses "Lightning Reflexes" to dodge a blast from the Treacherous Ape from The Dreamer's deck.
  • "Sucker Punch" shows Tachyon about to bludgeon Biomancer as he attempts to form a Tachyon fleshchild.
  • Friction is racing side by side with Tachyon on "Fleet of Foot".
  • Glamour takes a punch to the face in "Nimble Strike".
  • A Homunculus from Biomancer's deck is subjected to a "Lightspeed Barrage".

Confirmed

  • Tachyon is one of two confirmed LGBT heroes in the Sentinels universe, the other being Dr. Medico.
  • Spouse: Tachyon's wife is named Dana Bertrand. Dana's only official appearance is in the Freedom Four Annual #1 comic. Source - [1]
  • There is a specific Tachyon comic that takes place over 5 seconds (She runs off to eat, have a bunch of adventures, and get a pipe, all to come back and hit a guy who was trying to hit her before he finishes.) Adam, >G Forums
  • The Super Scientific Tachyon: This is not her origin story, but it is related to her origin Christopher, official Forums
  • Her relationship with Absolute Zero is the closest friendship within the Freedom Five (Letters Page Episode 1).
  • Tachyon’s birthday is listed as June 15th which is also the birthday of Neil Patrick Harris whom she has many references to his roles. In addition to the date she has the same birthplace of Albuquerque, New Mexico

Unconfirmed

  • The Incapacitated side of Tachyon has two shadowy figures in the background. One appears to be riding an ice bridge (and may be responsible for the ice holding her in place) and the other appears to be spinning rapidly. These could be references to Flash Villains of Captain Cold and The Top as Tachyon is obviously based on Flash. Who they are yet is unknown.

To Other Works

  • As a speedster-type superhero, Tachyon is a clear homage to DC Comics' Flash character.
  • Many of the villains featured on Tachyon's card artworks are homages to the Flash's rogues gallery:
    • The patchwork-esq. villain on "Sucker Punch" resembles the Trickster.
    • The ape villain on "Lightning Reflexes" (which is actually the Dreamer's Treacherous Ape projection) is an homage to Gorilla Grodd.
    • The villain Friction (who first appeared on the card "Fleet of Foot") is an inverted version of Tachyon, making her similar to the Reverse Flash.
    • The large zombie on "Lightspeed Barrage" may be a reference to Solomon Grundy.
    • The female villain on "Nimble Strike" greatly resembles Mirror Master. The shattered mirrors in the background further the comparison.
  • As a hyperactive super-learner, Tachyon is very similar to the DC Comics character Bart Allen, who is best known as the hero Impulse.
  • Several of Tachyon's cards reference Dr. Horrible from Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along-Blog
    • "Dude, you are not my nemesis." - "Fleet of Foot"
    • "Goodness, look at my wrist! I gotta go!" - "Quick Insight"
    • "So close! Just a few weeks from a real tangible conclusion." - "Research Grant"

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page Episode 14
      • How fast can she go? Without injuring herself? How to villains even hit her? How do her powers work (time manipulation or something else)? She doesn't really have an upper limit for how fast she can go. However, pretty much anybody else who got her powers the way she did wouldn't last long as they're not as meticulous, scientifically-rigorous as she is and probably would have blown past the "safe limit" immediately without testing things. This allowed her to build her speed suit and goggles to help protect herself. The "safe limit" is at least a few multiples of the speed of sound [mach 3 or mach 8 are thrown out there as speeds that they've mentioned she can go in various pieces of text but these sounded like ballpark figures to me rather than things they looked up specifically to have on hand for this podcast]. The "Pushing the Limits" art of her circling the Earth several times is pre-Progeny and was in a time when the writers didn't really see any defined downsides to her power (she was "kind of a Mary Sue" for a long time). Post-Progeny was a reaction to that to instill some actual limits on the character. How does her power work? "Look, she was hit with a stream of tachyons, which are these theoretical particles that can arrive before they leave and that's why she can move so fast." She's able to more completely transfer kinetic energy into other things, so if she gets a good run-up to hitting somebody, all of that energy from movement can get transferred. It's not a time-manipulation effect, she's genuinely operating faster than what is normally possible.
      • Does she have particular opinions on misuses of science (like Baron Blade or Graham Pike)? Does she have trouble relating to the "magic" characters like Gloomweaver or Argent Adept? What's her non-hero working relationship with Unity like? She uses her scientific acumen to better society, but she sees the scientific villains as selfish and as wasting their talent. She's aware of magic and acknowledges that it exists, but it's nonsense to her. Everything she does is A+B=C whereas Argent Adept is more like A+Fish=Turning the Universe Upside-Down. She doesn't particularly like fighting magic people, she's glad to have allies who can do it, she has no interest in being involved with magic. Relationship with Unity relatively positive. Unity seems more on board with the demanding nature of Tachyon's expectations re: lab procedure and doesn't take it as a personal slight. By OblivAeon they work really well together and are good friends. Unity has a more freeform/art approach to it which is a nice complement to Tachyon's approach.
      • What's the deal between Tachyon and Glamour? One of Tachyon's hobbies is going to magic shows (stage magic as opposed to the "real" kind) and she likes trying to figure out how they did it (she's bad at it if the magician is any good). They're nemeses because they've fought a bunch (Glamour robs a bank and Tachyon fights her) and the story just kind of works out that way, but Tachyon looooves to fight her because this kind of trickery is all she does and Tachyon likes dealing with this illusion stuff. This irritates Glamour (just beyond the always losing the fight reasons).
      • On a scale of 1-10, how annoyed is Tachyon at the prospect of having to ride on public transit? "Is there a number higher than 10 in existence?" What kinds of things does she, as a person with super-speed, find annoying that normal people would take for granted? Tachyon is actually pretty patient with the world around her. She was pretty comfortable with being the fastest thinker in the room well before she got powers (she was already in her 30s by that point). She's also got stuff to do (mentally if necessary) if she is delayed by something. One exception is sleeping - she still needs 6-8 hours a night just like anybody else and the time spent doing "nothing" annoys her.
      • There are implications that she eats a lot (possibly to maintain a suped-up metabolism); does she ever run out of energy mid-battle? She doesn't run out of energy through lack of food. She's invented a bunch of methods of offsetting her need for caloric intake (energy bars, protein pills, etc.). She still loves food, though. She brings a crate along and stops off for a snack during a fight.
      • Since getting her speed powers has she ever been late for anything? Not really. But she wasn't really the type to ever be late for things even before that (see: the whole efficiency runner through this whole thing).
      • What's Tachyon's relationship with her own sexuality, does she identify as a lesbian or something else, when did she know that she was LGBT+, did she struggle with it, and is she an icon within the world of Sentinels Comics or the "real" world they're published in? Going in reverse: Yes, she's an icon within that world: she came out in the mid-80s and got married before it was legal in our world. This was a big deal in a positive way. She identifies as lesbian. It's always been important to her (since that story in the 80s), but not the most important part - the guys stress that they don't want any of their characters to be that one-note.
      • How did she and Dana meet? How do they manage marriage at two different speeds? They met in college, both were moving to Megalopolis for different reasons afterwards and moved there together, they started dating after that. Dana was a successful model, started managing herself after a while, and now helps other younger models get started. She does a lot of humanitarian events and whatnot. Also just really busy. It's convenient that Tachyon can zip across the country, if necessary, to still have lunch or something with her.
      • Children? No. Pets? No. They're both rarely in the house since they're both so busy. They do well with each other, but wouldn't do well with other living things that they're responsible for.
      • Dana in a lot of danger given her spouse's public identity as hero? Well, first Dana is a very high-profile person in her own right and so has been a target. MMFFCC card involves her (Glamour captured people in the Shooting Gallery). It's not frequent (her role isn't to be the damsel in distress), but has happened.
      • Does Tachyon actually like the hero business or just a means to the end of research funding? How does she find the time for this plus finding a wife? She found the person who became her wife before the powers. At first she didn't particularly like it and it was pretty mercenary. She's come to like working with the Freedom Five and Unity and everybody, though.
      • Why was Tachyon against Omnitron-X being rebuilt and did she ever accept him? She doesn't view Omnitron-X as having personhood. It's a programmed AI, not a complete person (it's like a toaster). This really upset Unity considering her friendship with it. She doesn't ever really get to the point of accepting it either. Whether this is true or not, this is treated as a negative aspect of her personality in the comics.
      • Who are the the ice and whirlwind characters in her incap art? Maerynians. One is named Leviathan (seen before, but not by name) the other is a disciple of the cult that Leviathan works to start.
      • On "Quick Insight" she's being attacked by a fighter jet; what's happening there? Jet is piloted by Ambuscade doing his action hero evil thing.
      • What happened to Freedom Six Tachyon after her run-in with Ambuscade [I assume referring to that card's incap where she's been kneecapped]? In Iron Legacy timeline she is, initially, on-board with the efficiency that comes with Legacy's vision of "heroics" as a more authoritarian pursuit. When this brings him into conflict with their friends, she quickly reverses on this position and goes into hiding. She recruits some former allies and leads a covert resistance. Meanwhile, Iron Legacy gives some foes that he captures a chance to work for him and Ambuscade takes him up on this - becoming The Iron Hand. Ambuscade gets the drop on her, disables her (incap art), and then kills her. The Iron Legacy timeline is the worst timeline that the guys have shown.
      • How fast is she compared to Friction? Way faster. Friction has an upper limit capped by the suit, which isn't even up to what it was designed to do.
      • After Vengeance, did she and Friction settle their differences? Krystal burns herself out - see the Friction incap art. "Krystal Lee does not survive Friction."
      • Why does she try to invent a speed suit? It's a great thing to have! Imagine if every firefighter or surgeon had one, or whole soccer teams. Tachyon's more of a scientist than a hero and if she could reproduce her powers in a useful, safe way why wouldn't she do so?
      • "Supersonic Response" shows her attacking Writhe; we know that he started as a criminal, but what's the event shown here? Mainstay, Dr. Medio, and Idealist were fighting him, as he was an early foe for them. There was a small break in the action and suddenly just keels over. Tachyon had noticed what was going on during a trip across the country and just knocked him out and kept going. The Southwest Sentinels didn't even know what happened.
      • On "Infecting an Heir" we see the Countess feeding on her (presumably infecting her with vampirism). Who cured her and how? Did vampire-speed augment her own speed? Did the Countess target her specifically and, if so, why? This was a story from Absolution, Fanatic's solo book. Fanatic is fighting her way through the vampires in the Court of Blood. She bursts through a door and finds that the Countess already has Tachyon chained up (this was a surprise as it hadn't happened "on screen" in any prior book). While Fanatic is fighting the other vampires, Bathory mocks Fanatic and eventually infects Tachyon with her blood magic. Vampires in-setting are creatures of blood magic (more on this in the Fanatic episode, probably at least a few months away, and maybe an Interlude). Fanatic dispatches the other vampires, but now has to fight both the Countess and Tachyon (who's not as fast due to the disorientation of becoming a thrall to another). Things aren't going well for Fanatic, but Tachyon eventually manages to overcome the Countess's control somewhat because her fast metabolism is able to fight against the blood magic. That's a turning point as they are able to take down the Countess and escape. The metabolism also sped up the transformation process, though, which is bad. Fanatic used her faith power to "cleanse" her system and save her.

Sources


Tantrum/References

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Artwork

  • Tantrum is about to be flicked by Huge Sky-Scraper on the card "Proportionist"

Confirmed

  • Tantrum is the first peek we had at the Nemesis symbol for Sky-Scraper, revealed before the actual hero.

To Other Works

  • As a diminutive female character with super-strength, she has a passing resemblance to non-villain Molly Hayes from Marvel's Runaways comic.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • How is Tantrum a nemesis of Sky-Scraper (it seems weird that an alien gladiator would have a nemesis on Earth)? It's often more useful to keep her around if SS isn't as well, what's she like? What we know about her from the card game: Tantrum looks like a small child who is very strong and is angry with Sky-Scraper. More info: she's a full-grown adult, but is stuck looking like this. She makes forcefields - this is helpful in defense, but also when she punches something it's the forcefield hitting them, allowing her to impart a lot of force without it having that "equal and opposite" force on her directly. She's also very hot headed. She's only a nemesis in that during the general Vengeance events she was sent to fight SS and there was a notable encounter there and there's an ongoing rivalry between them in stories when SS is on Earth.

Sources


Tear/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Tefnut/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Tempest/References

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Artwork

  • Tempest is missing an arm on his Incapacitated side. His Freedom Six incarnation is also missing an arm, and has replaced it with one made of living energy.
  • The card "Reclaim From the Deep" shows Tempest recovering numerous items from the ocean floor. Among them are:
    • The Staff of Ra.
    • Bunker's helmet.
    • DC's Wonder-Woman's gauntlets and Lasso of Truth.
    • DC's Green Lantern's power ring.
    • Marvel's Captain America's shield.
    • A difficult to identify white object.
    • In the distance, shady like, possibly the Bat Plane (DC comics).

Confirmed

  • While Tempest's biography on the official Sentinels of the Multiverse website implies that M'kk was able to divert the F.I.L.T.E.R. agents sent to capture the Maerynians away from the main crash site, thus allowing the other members of his species to avoid capture, his biography in the Enhanced Edition official rulebook states that F.I.L.T.E.R. captured all the survivors of the crash. No information exists to confirm the true fate of his fellow surviving Maerynians.

To Other Works

  • Tempest's name, M'kk Dall'ton, which can be pronounced as Mack Dalton, is perhaps an homage to DC Comic's Martian Manhunter. The Manhunter's real name is J'onn J'onzz, which can be pronounced as the human name "John Jones."
  • Tempest's ability to talk to fish (as shown on "Aquatic Correspondence") is a reference to DC's Aquaman.
  • Tempest's weather manipulation powers are similar to those of the Marvel X-Men character Storm.
  • The "Sky Sparkle" shown on "Into the Stratosphere" is a common trope in the anime and manga genres.

Sources


Temple of Zhu Long/References

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Artwork

  • "Rites of Revival" shows the scene when the nascent Dark Watch team have arrived at the Temple and are shown into a room just as the resurrected Mr. Fixer emerges from the pool. He's essentially mindless at this point and attacks them immediately.

Confirmed

  • The process of reanimation depicted on "Rites of Revival" that brought Mr. Fixer back from death isn't true resurrection. Zhu Long uses two processes, one repairs a body and makes what Adam and Christopher called a "healthy zombie", the second process is what captures the deceased's soul and traps it in the body prepared previously. Mr. Fixer was not returned to true "life" at this point and his bitterness is more or less a result of him (unknown to himself or other heroes at the time) being forced to haunt his own body. (Letters Page 10)

To Other Works

  • At his temple Zhu Long has a pool used to revive people as seen on the card Rites of a Revival. It is known having gone through this that Mr Fixer isn't himself upon his resurrection. This is similar to Lazurus Pit used by the Batman villlain Ra's Al Ghul

Sources


The Adhesivist/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


The Block/References

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Artwork

  • The character "Char" has appeared on numerous cards before his proper introduction in The Block's deck.
  • The scribbling on the wall on "Time-Crazed Prisoner" hint at many possible future plot points in the Sentinels storyline, most notably the writings "The Child is the Center," "Earth Will Fall," and "Concentric Worlds."
  • Char, Fright Train, Set, and Apostate all appear on the "Prison Riot" card.
  • Forum goer Rabit is the basis for the Imprisoned Rogue
  • "Defensive Displacement" shows Spite being contained while a guard takes a coffee break.

Confirmed

  • Kismet makes her final escape from the Block during the latter half of the OblivAeon events. The way that she leaves, "locking" the door behind her has an impact on the diverging timelines - she escapes into what becomes the RPG reality while the Block winds up as a "polyp dimension" attached to the Tactics reality. Neither she nor the Block exist in the other reality after the split (Letters Page Interlude 3).
  • The Block is an extra dimensional space created, in some way, by the Realm of Discord. FILTER discovered and claimed this space. Eventually, FILTER forewent their government funding and became essentially mercenaries. Gen Con 2016 Q&A

Unconfirmed

  • The emblem of the F.I.L.T.E.R. agents is an image of a Gray, a popular type of alien. This is because, as noted in Tempest's backstory, F.I.L.T.E.R. was originally dedicated to monitoring and policing alien life on Earth before it expanded it's jurisdiction to super criminals.

To Other Works

  • As an alternate dimensional prison, The Block is very similar to DC's Phantom Zone and Marvel's Negative Zone.
  • The name "F.I.L.T.E.R." is likely a reference to Marvel's S.H.I.E.L.D. organization.

Sources


The Celestial Tribunal/References

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Art References

  • The holographic images pictured on “Found Wanting” display Dr. Tremata and the Fence. Both are shown with a projectile (a dart and an arrow respectively) jutting from the left side of their chests. The human heart is usually located on the left side of the chest. It is very probable that both of these characters were killed by such an injury. Based on the facial structure and hairline, the silhouetted figure on the third image to the right may be Tony Taurus.
  • Relating to the above, the villain accused for the assaults/murders depicted on “Found Wanting” is referred to by the flavor text as “Heartbreaker.” Based on the methods of dispatch the holograms depict, it is clear that his name is a pun on his method of killing. The fact that heartbreaker uses various thrown projectiles to attack may make him an homage to the Marvel villain Bullseye.
  • "Character Witnesses" shows the Dark Watch team coming to the defense of Harpy (in her solo hero costume, rather than either her Villain or Dark Watch costumes).
  • "Called to Judgement" shows Sky-Scraper as a defendant and Tempest as a witness.
  • "Paragon of Sentience" shows the Celestial Adjudicator observing The Scholar and Guise in a battle withAeon Men.
  • "Representative of Earth" shows Omnitron-X being watched by the Celestial Adjudicator and Celestial Executioner.

Unconfirmed

Confirmed

  • The tribunal is the only deck in SOTM that can draw cards from decks not used in the current in-play game (“Representative of Earth”). Until the Guise variant Completionist Guise was released.

Reference

  • A court of powerful aliens judging humanity is a well-known science fiction staple. Perhaps the most popular example is the 1987 pilot episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation “Encounter at Farpoint,” in which the human race was judged by an omnipotent race called the Q. In the episode, a small handful of humans were selected to represent the entire species, an M.O. shared by the Tribunal.
  • The spaceship which houses the Celestial Tribunal is shaped like a massive sword. This may be a reference to the Sentient World Observation and Response Department (S.W.O.R.D.) from Marvel comics, a global defense group dedicated to protection from extraterrestrial threats. Additionally, the tribunal ship bears a strong resemblance to S.W.O.R.D.’s orbital base of operations, the Peak.
  • The font for the Celestial Tribunal card backs is nearly identical to the one used in the 2011 superhero film Green Lantern.

The Citizens of the Sun/References

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Art References

Unconfirmed

Confirmed

Reference

  • Much like Citizen Dawn is a reference to Magneto. The Citizens of the Sun are like the Brotherhood of Mutants founded by Magneto.

The Court of Blood(Environment)/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Hunter Fulepet based on appearance and card text is like Van Helsing and Blade.
  • Blood Countess Bathory is likely a reference to the real life Elizabeth Báthory, a Hungarian Countess who lived from 1560 until 1614. She was arrested in 1610 for kidnapping and torture of young women (some estimates put the total at over 650 victims, although the "verified" count is closer to 80) and was subject to house arrest for the last 4 years of her life. She's entered into vampire folklore due to the unsubstantiated rumor that she bathed in the blood of virgins to maintain her youth.
    • Likewise, the servant Drudge Ficko could be a reference to a servant condemned as an accomplice and subsequently beheaded and Dame Katarina could be named after the real Countess's daughter.
    • The deck's red and green color scheme is also similar to the Countess's personal coat of arms.

Sources


The Court of Blood/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Hunter Fulepet based on appearance and card text is like Van Helsing and Blade.
  • Blood Countess Bathory is likely a reference to the real life Elizabeth Báthory, a Hungarian Countess who lived from 1560 until 1614. She was arrested in 1610 for kidnapping and torture of young women (some estimates put the total at over 650 victims, although the "verified" count is closer to 80) and was subject to house arrest for the last 4 years of her life. She's entered into vampire folklore due to the unsubstantiated rumor that she bathed in the blood of virgins to maintain her youth.
    • Likewise, the servant Drudge Ficko could be a reference to a servant condemned as an accomplice and subsequently beheaded and Dame Katarina could be named after the real Countess's daughter.
    • The deck's red and green color scheme is also similar to the Countess's personal coat of arms.

Sources


The Crew of the La Paradoja Magnifica/References

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Art References

Unconfirmed

Confirmed

Reference

The Ennead/References

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Artwork

  • The Ra pictured on "Ancient Magicks" is the "Horus of Two Horizons" version.

Confirmed

  • The Ennead have the only deck in SOTM that is composed entirely of one-shots.
  • When they first appeared, the Ennead defeated Ra in a massive battle, causing him to become amnesiac and wander the desert for years before eventually returning as Ra: Horus of the Two Horizons
  • Notes from
    • Roderick Ward and twelve other "treasure hunters" (read that as "grave robbers") were investigating this newly-uncovered shrine in the desert. It's full of traps (so many traps) and mummies - very similar to the Tomb of Anubis, but it's a separate place. Four members of the group die from the various hazards there, but the remaining nine make it to the central chamber easily after that (funny how it seemed to stop trying to kill them off once there were exactly nine of them left - that's probably a coincidence).
    • In that central chamber there are nine statues present, each holding an impressive Relic. Like with Blake Washington Jr. and the Staff of Ra, each of the remaining people is drawn to pick up one of them. [Insert transformation sequence here.] They now have this great power, a desire for more, and a sense of entitlement. They have more power as a group, together, and that's what they wish to enhance.
      • Atum - Roderick Ward, the leader of the thieves, but also now the leader of the Ennead. Relic - a jeweled bracer. As Atum he is accompanied by two golden scarabs - he's also a sun/fire god but it takes the form more directed beams ("sun lasers") than Ra's general fire everywhere approach.
      • Geb - Charles Philips. Relic - a golden sickle. Giant serpent man, the largest physically of them. A god of the earth - creating earthquakes and whatnot.
      • Isis - Jessica Douglas. Relic - a sun disk (associated more with the goddess Hathor, but also seen on depictions of Isis). She wears it on her forehead. She sprouts some big bat wings (even though historical depictions show her with falcon wings - that's odd).
      • Nephthys - Anna Rochester. Relic - an obsidian ankh, which allows her to tap into funerary powers.
      • Nuit - Diane Lawson. Relic - the Magic Orb of Nuit which allows her to control and be the sky itself.
      • Osiris - Logan Brown. Relic - the crook and flail (a matched set of relics that always go together).
      • Set - Steve Karr - the Typhonic Rod (Set being conflated with the Greek Typhon) - this is a large scepter/small staff with the head of the Set Animal/Typhonic Beast on it. He can control storms.
      • Shu - Francis Li. Relic - a bronze khopesh (the type of curved sword that Mdjai wields in the Tomb of Anubis deck). He becomes the air itself.
      • Tefnut - Winona Ross - a votive shield (kind of a mid-sized round buckler). She becomes a furred cat creature.

To Other Works

  • The numerous grails in the background of "Taste of Immortality" is a reference to the climax of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.
  • Like Ra, The Ennead are based on deities from actual Egyptian mythology (in this case the Ennead of Heliopolis). The Ennead gained prominence after a decline in the worship of Ra during the 6th dynasty, but Ra later saw a resurgence after a being conflated with Horus (which provides the source of the name Ra Horus of Two Horizons).
    • Atum - primordial creation deity (his name is thought to derive from the word "complete" thus his title in the game "World Finisher"), his worship was conflated with that of Ra for a time. His children:
    • Shu - god of the air.
    • Tefnut - goddess of moisture/rain/dew/etc. Their children:
    • Nut - goddess of the sky, her title in the game "She Who Protects" is attested, but she was the "protector" of Ra as the sun in the sky.
    • Geb - god of the earth, associated with earthquakes and snakes (although not always depicted with a snake for a head). Their children:
    • Osiris - god of the dead/afterlife/underworld/rebirth. Generally depicted with green skin holding the crook and flail like in the card art. Although the card has him without clothes above the waist (unlike typical depictions), the red sash/belt and white trousers do match the classical depictions.
    • Isis - goddess of health, marriage, and wisdom. Also associated with magic and sometimes depicted with wings, although usually feathered falcon wings as part of her arms rather than the separate, bat-like wings in the card art.
    • Set - god of the desert, storms, and disorder. There's no consensus on what animal Set's head is meant to represent.
    • Nephthys - goddess of death, funerary rites, etc. Also sometimes shown with falcon wings like Isis and incinerating the pharaoh's enemies with her fiery breath. Her depiction in the game as wearing mummy wrappings is presumably a reference to her association with funerals, but doesn't match her classical appearance.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

    • Previously it was mentioned that the Ennead really only show up for their main story arc, but Nightmist was involved in a Vengeance arc before fighting Isis and Ra was involved in Vengeance and then fought the Ennead - what's the actual timeline going on here? The major plot (finding Relics, fighting Ra who then goes off into the desert, Atum going to Ethiopia) was the second time this story was actually told in Sentinel Comics (and was told by much better writers that time). The first time (decidedly pre-Vengeance), these 9 gods just show up and fight Ra, defeat him, and just go around being villains (no "taking over Egypt" plot). Eventually Ra regroups, teams up with other heroes, and they defeat the 9. The end. There was no gravitas given to the proceedings and not a lot of thought put into the implications of 9 other gods showing up - it just kind of fell flat. After Vengeance, somebody wanted to take this old story and rework it to make it better. This second telling is now retconned into the "canonical" version of the Ennead story and is the one that we deal with in the card game and whatnot - the other one is kind of ignored.
    • What happened to the 4 members of Ward's group who died before the rest became the Ennead? They died for real due to the hazards of the Shrine explicitly so that there were 9 remaining. There have to be 9 to enter the chamber - a smaller group would never make it that far.
    • How do the members of Ward's team feel about the 4 who died in the Shrine? Do they worry that Roderick will give them up for dead too? They're all shady people and don't really trust one another. There's no love lost between them, but a larger share for me! After getting the power, this stuff pretty much becomes of negligible importance.
    • Are the gods always jerks? Do Discworld rules apply where gods have less power if fewer people believe in them? They're not really gods, just people with a lot of power - worshipers don't matter in terms of power (although in the distant past some incarnations certainly cared about their worshipers). They might be more or less benevolent, but as a group they've always opposed Ra and so in a world where Ra is a hero, they will by necessity be villains.
    • In "Death's Grasp" we see Tempest in a bad situation, who saved him? Initially, Tempest was acting weaker than he was to get Nephthys to chase him as part of the whole Operation "Don't Fight All Nine of them at Once, Guys". She does eventually get the drop on him and drains a bunch of his life force, but Tempest does eventually turn the tables by himself.
    • How did the other nations in the area respond to the Ennead? Militarily? Views from a religious perspective? In this world there are people with powers, so they were just more of that. As mentioned, Ethiopia was the first nation to speak out and we see what happened there - that kind of shut everybody else up (nobody knew that he was really drained after that and couldn't do it again).
    • What went down vs. OblivAeon? There's not really a turn-by-turn, blow-by-blow description. You can basically just look at the relevant ARG page.
    • They don't seem to get along (they're all nemeses by the game rules), but in myth many of them are related/married to one another; does whoever currently is, say, Isis have an attachment to the current Osiris? Does the power behind the relics care which gender the person who claims a relic is and/or does the god-form alter the body to conform to the "original" bearer's gender? Could non-biological entities (like, say, Omnitron) become empowered by them? Certain people are drawn to certain artifacts and the Relics do call to people whose gender matches the original bearer's as they are trying to find people who match them as closely as possible. The marriages in ancient history don't really have an effect on the relationships of current hosts. Non-biological entities could not be empowered.
    • What about the Egyptian gods who aren't represented in the game? All of the other Relics are locked beyond the gate of the Underworld that Anubis guards - even the Ennead's were out there until Anubis sent them out into the world as described last week.
    • Who's the most powerful member of the Ennead? They are all very powerful but each individual's "power" is largely different from the others so it's hard to compare apples to apples. Atum has the most direct offensive power, but used up the majority of it in the Ethiopia incident. It's hard to pick out anybody else as stronger than the others given the diversity in their approach to what "power" even means.
    • Would it be possible for somebody good to pick up one of the Ennead's Relics and become a hero? More segues...

Sources


The Final Wasteland/References

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Artwork

  • The figure cowering in the midst of the monsters on "Unforgiving Wasteland" may be Writhe.

Confirmed

Unconfirmed

  • Judging by the fact that Chrono-Ranger is Plague Rat's nemesis, it can be assumed that the rat monsters of this timeline are descendants of Plague Rat.

To Other Works

  • A future overrun by horrible monsters is nothing new to comic books. Such futures are used as set-ups for heroes to seek out a moment in time and then alter it, rewriting history.

Sources


The Freedom Four/References

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Art References

Unconfirmed

Confirmed

Reference

The Freedom Team/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • From Podcast Episode 19
    • Did the numbering of issues reset? At no point did the FF title get renumbered.
    • Were the FFA books actually annual? They were in sort of a "at most once a year" kind of state - they're more of a "here's a special issue" for an event rather than being published regularly every 12 months.
    • Is there typically a resolution of a story in the Annuals or were they used to introduce new stories that would then be resolved later? Kind of both. Some were complete "one-shot" style stories, others were the culmination of events that had been going on in the main books, and yet others launched these events that would then continue in others. The FFA books were also generally crossover stories - only really #1, #2, and #12 were just the team.
    • Are there any FF issues that don't actually feature the FF? Yes, but they're very rare. Some of the OblivAeon stuff as mentioned above, there's the one Freedom Six issue during the Iron Legacy story.
    • Which hero besides the FF and Unity made the most appearances in the FF book - why did they not become a member? Haka and Tempest are around a lot (that's why they're in the BBQ picture), but they go on to make their own team. They often acted as a point-of-contact for other stuff happening out in the world when they'd cross over to the FF stuff.
    • What does the FF think about Guise? They try not to.
    • Who's the most persistent villain? Baron Blade.
    • Who had the most success in beating the FF? Baron Blade.
    • Which villain was the least successful in defeating them? Baron Blade. He's just hugely important to the setting and to the FF team specifically and even to the Multiverse setting itself, if you look at his arc.
    • During the Mad-Bomber Blade event, what were the FF up to leading up to him storming in with his death ray? As was mentioned in the Baron Blade episode, when he set his bombs all over town and called them out, they weren't there. The FF was on Mars fighting aliens at the time (this is a pretty early FF story) and so other heroes fight him. The FF returns right at the end of the plot and that's when the death ray incident happens.
    • Which members have the hardest time seeing eye-to-eye? Legacy and AZ - they're kind of on opposite ends of fortunate happenstance. They all get along well and by the midpoint of the overall arc they're all friends, but Legacy's cheerful outlook is contrasted with AZ's pessimism.
    • How does the team handle the fact that only the Wraith really has a secret identity? Most stories they're involved in aren't really ones that secret identities would really factor into (although she does still try to keep her identity secret from the team for a few issues at the beginning). Wraith's solo stories involve the secret identity factor quite a bit, though.
    • What is the reaction of the rest of the team to Wraith and Bunker's relationship? "It's about time." Everybody else pretty much knew what was going on well before Bunker and Wraith did - even Unity twigging that something was up between them when she joined. [This sounds kind of at odds to the description of there not being a lot of will-they-won't-they prior back in the Wraith Episode - I guess it's possible that everybody else being aware that this was gonna happen could actually be a pretty short interval, though.]
    • When Freedom Five Annual switched back to Freedom Four for one issue, what was the cause (Wraith being thought to have died? c.f. her incap art)? First, she wasn't thought dead (comic covers lie a lot) - it was indicative of her thinking about her life and possibly giving up heroics. The Freedom Four Annual #7 issue is a flashback issue while Tachyon and AZ are talking about the old-time Freedom Four vs. Baron Blade (setting up some more of his specific backstory).
    • Have there been "temporary" members of the team, say while another member is out of commission for some reason? None of the teams have had "short-term" members. There are plenty of cameos and team-ups, but it's not like there's people rotating on and off some kind of official roster.
    • The Freedom Five are government-sponsored, does this put limits on who or where they can fight/help? Yes. Initially there were very little restrictions as it was pretty hand-wavey (we have funding, don't ask questions), it wasn't until the writers started paying more attention to the implications of government involvement that it started to matter. The Termi-Nation event (more in Chokepoint's episode next week) starts to getting into the stresses inherent in the government telling the heroes what to do.
    • The old FFHQ building shows up in Friction's deck (FFA #27) but Ermine shows up at the Freedom Tower reception desk citing that same issue; we've been told that FT became the HQ after the old building was destroyed during the Vengeance event, but when/why/etc. was FT built? They don't. FFA #27 involves Freedom Tower and the Tomb of Anubis. FFHQ was destroyed at the beginning of the Vengeance event and by the end the FF are set up in Freedom Tower. The art from Ermine's card ("Long Con") is actually from a later event when she and Fright Train break in (mentioned last week) - art and quotes don't have to actually correspond to one another.
    • Did the FF recruit their lawyer, Ms. Hawke, for the Trial of Baron Blade event or another time? Is she close to the team? What major plots has she been involved in? She shows up at FFHQ following the trial event to offer her services. She doesn't really get along with them (she thinks the whole heroing thing is silly), but her job is to keep them out of trouble legally, and she's good at it, not to be their friend. She has her own office, but when Freedom Tower is being built, it's kind of with an eye to all of the support staff they've accrued over time. The logic is kind of wonky (FFHQ was pretty much just them, but after it gets blown up and when they open Freedom Tower a lot more people work in the building). Now they've got their lawyer, a janitorial staff (Larry!), some maintenance personnel for all of the gadgets involved with the team, researchers/technicians working with Tachyon, the people who work on costumes, etc. Most of the staff gets evacuated before OblivAeon destroys the place, but that means the team is still there when it happens.
    • If the Wraith sold off all her stuff to "buy out" the team's government obligations (Tactics timeline), how does the team pay for things after? She didn't spend all of the money and they continue to use the remainder. Tachyon has some patents that bring in some income as she's no longer part of the old lab and is operating independently now.
    • In the Unity episode we find out that she was originally on a cartoon adaptation, how closely did it stick to the comics? Did they have to tone down violence/did characters like Nightmist or Expatriette show up? Any hints about Tachyon's relationship with her wife? It got changed a lot - violence was toned down a lot, no relationship stuff. There would be cameo episodes for other characters, but still just not representative of the comics at all.
    • Are there details about the Sentinel Comics staff? Writers, artists, etc.? Yes, the guys have put some thought into this kind of stuff - more on this at a later date

Sources


The Hairdryer/References

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Confirmed

  • Came to life in the Realm of Discord.

Sources


The Idolater/References

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Artwork

  • This is the priest seen on the Foil incap side for Fanatic

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


The Master/References

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Confirmed

  • His name is Xian Niu

Sources


The Operative/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Unconfirmed

  • Due to the fact that she and Mr. Fixer are nemeses with some commonalities in their back-stories, it can be safely assumed that the martial arts school The Operative attended as a child was the same one that Mr. Fixer used to run.
  • Both the Operative and Mr Fixer have a blue dragon tattoo. Mr Fixer only gained the Tattoo after being stabbed in the chest by The Operative. This Tattoo may be related to some sort of rebirth.

Sources


The Organization/References

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Confirmed

  • The Logo for The Organization is made up of 5 Stripes (one for each Underboos and branch), a snake head (for The Operative) and a Pike across the center, for Chairman Pike.

Unconfirmed

  • Sentinel Tactics brought much information on the Underbosses - however, it appears that the Muscle, The Fence, and The Contract of the Original Organization all fell or were no longer useful to The Operative, as she recruited new bodies to these roles.

Sources


The Organization: Broker/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


The Organization: Contract/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


The Organization: Deputy/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


The Organization: Fence/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

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The Organization: Muscle/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Unconfirmed

Like the Fence and the Contract, Janos does not appear to be the original Muscle of The Chairman's Organization. The Chairman's version is a small wiry, (possibly irish with the bolar?) man, a complete contrast to The Operative's version of The Muscle.

Sources


The Organization: Thugs/References

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Confirmed

  • The Informant, Hired Gun, Enforcers, Thief, and Crooked Cop are Thugs from the original Organization, represented in The Chairman's deck. Thugs from The Operative's Organization In Sentinel Tactics are not nearly as fleshed out.

Sources


The Seer/References

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Artwork

  • The Seer is seen fighting Nightmist on "Heedless Lash".

Confirmed

To Other Works

  • The Seer greatly resembles the Marvel hero Danny Rand, aka the Immortal Iron Fist.

Sources


The Spites/References

Note: This is a reference for all five 'Spites' from Battle for Broken City - one reference for all 5 due to their unique style nature



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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


The Thorathian Armada/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


The Vandals/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Thugs/References

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Art References

Unconfirmed

Confirmed

  • The Informant, Hired Gun, Enforcers, Thief, and Crooked Cop are Thugs from the original Organization, represented in The Chairman's deck. Thugs from The Operative's Organization In Sentinel Tactics are not nearly as fleshed out.

Reference

Time Cataclysm/References

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Artwork

  • The time cataclysm has many cards that are call backs (or, in a few cases, call forwards) to other Sentinels environments and events:
    • "Main Computer Room" - Freedom Five Annual #1 webcomic
    • "Charging Triceratops" - Insula Primalis
    • "Fixed Point" - Most likely the Realm of Discord. Possibly one of the Time Cataclysm's "own" cards.
    • "Passing Tumbleweed" - Silver Gulch. It should be noted that the Silver Gulch mini-expansion was published after the Shattered Timelines expansion, making this a future event.
    • "Surprise Shopping Trip" - Megalopolis or Rook City.
    • "Giant Mutated Cockroach" - Pike Industrial.
    • "Tendrils of Madness" - Realm of Discord.
    • "Atlantean Throne Room" - Ruins of Atlantis
    • "Oppressing Smog" - Rook City
    • "Typhoon" - Most likely Insula Primalis
    • "Crushing Hallway" - Tomb of Anubis.
    • "Marsquake" - Wagner Mars Base
    • "F.I.L.T.E.R. Spy" - The Block. .

Confirmed

  • "The child is the center" refers to The Dreamer. A hint at this can be found on the infamous card "Fixed Point". The "Fixed Point" is that in every reality, young Vanessa Long manifests powers. The Visionary came from her time to prevent the Vanessa Long of this reality from going through what she did, and yet, this reality's Vanessa Long STILL manifested powers. This is important, because these "Fixed Points" across spacetime is how OblivAeon is destroying everything. The more points that realities have in common, the more they draw "close" and if multiple realities are too close, they act as cosmic anti-matter, destroying each other. [1]

To Other Works

  • The card "Typhoon" represents the real world typhoon that delayed delivery of the Infernal Relics expansion [2]
  • The F.I.L.T.E.R Spy pictured bears a strong resemblance to the Spy class of the PC game Team Fortress 2
  • The flavor text of 'Crushing Hallway' is a reference to the compactor scene from Star Wars: A New Hope.
  • On "Tendrils of Madness" the creature pictured on the back of Visionary's head is very similar to the "Thought Nibbler," a card from the Magic the Gathering TCG that is famous for being useless.

Sources


Tomb of Anubis/References

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Artwork

  • "Judgement of Anubis" includes Ammit, the eater of souls. Her role would be to eat the heart being weighed against the feather of Truth if it's heavier.
  • "Swarm of Scarabs" shows Bunker from behind, looking up at the swarming insects.
  • "Cast into the Underworld" shows Visionary being submerged in some glowing green mist.
  • "Spike Trap" shows the Wraith being surprised by a skull impaled on a spike.

Confirmed

  • This deck contains one of the few non-character card/villain card nemesis - Anubis, with Ra's symbol. Likewise, he is a nemesis to the entire Ennead

To Other Works

  • The Tomb of Anubis is based on the various depictions of ancient trap-laden tombs in popular culture. Among the most famous of these fictional tombs is the one from the opening of Raiders of the Lost Ark.
  • The pool of necrotic miasma that the Visionary is struggling within on "Cast Into the Underworld" is very similar to the whirlpool of the dead seen at the climax of the Disney movie Hercules.
  • Most of the mummy cards are homages of mummies from various films.

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Unity/References

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Artwork

  • The card art for the golem versions of the Freedom Five is interconnected, with Turret Bot being on the far left and Champion Bot, Stealth Bot, Swift Bot, and Cryo-Bot following in order to the right.
  • **Golem Unity Promo** May be wearing Mr. Fixer's hat. It has been referenced that if Mr Fixer is seen without his hat, then he is dead. This may mean Mr Fixer is dead in the Shattered Timelines Iron Legacy Future. (Confirmed Letters Page 10)
  • The art on Unity's incapacitated side seems to be an homage to Magneto's plastic prison at the end of the X-Men movie. Both Magneto and Unity would need to be incarcerated in metal-free environments to deny their powers of anything to interact with.
  • Baron Blade looks annoyed as he encounters the "Platform Bot".
  • "Powered Shock Wave" displays the firepower of several Bee Bots as they attack The Radioactivist.
  • Magman encounters Stealth Bot in "Volatile Parts"

Confirmed

  • Many of Unity's flavor texts hint at her seeing Tachyon as a quasi-maternal figure. She seems to have programmed Swift Bot with a humorously simplified version of Tachyon's personality, or perhaps she has simply programmed it to repeat things indicative of her.

Unconfirmed

  • Cryo-Bot's flavor text may be reference to Absolute Zero's relative lack of popularity in the Sentinels fandom.
  • Raptor Bot's (aka "Mr. Chomps'") gameplay mechanics are very similar to those of the Raptor Packs from Insula Primalis, hinting that Unity based its design on them.
  • The flavor text of "Volatile Parts" seems to hint that the golems have a measure of self-awareness. That, or Unity simply sees them in that light.

To Other Works

  • Unity's unusual powers, pragmatic attire, and underused ethnicity are all traits commonly found in the characters of the Wildstorm universe.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page 18
      • We've seen bots in other decks besides her own (and in the ARG), does she have bot-versions of other heroes besides the FF? Could a hypothetical Unity-bot recursively make more bots? How far does the rabbit-hole go? Are we listening to a Christopher-bot and Adam-bot read and answer questions? First, they are definitely the normal human persons and not robot duplicates. She makes lots of bots all the time - it's a common misconception that her bots stick around for a long time. She makes them with her mind and they operate without her needing to really expend a lot of concentration on them, but they probably only stick around for 10 minutes, max, unless she's actively keeping them going. She's not building and coding behavior for robots like Tachyon would. She's made robot versions of lots of heroes and villains, several types of dinosaurs, animals, just whatever occurs to her as something that would work well or at least be funny.
      • Do any other bots get fun names like Mr. Chomps? Well, Bee Bot looks more like a hornet (fun story: Christopher had written "Bee Bot" and Adam responded with "Hornets are more fun to draw." and the "'Bee Bot' is more fun to say" explanation was a reference to that - there's also a fun anecdote about an interaction Christopher had with a young Unity cosplayer at a convention). Even though she doesn't constantly have a raptor bot around (see above about how they don't last long) whenever she makes a raptor bot, it's always Mr. Chomps, even when there's a bunch of raptor bots at the same time - this gets under Tachyon's skin a little bit.
      • Do the bots talk, does Unity do funny voices for them, or do the bots talk but sound like Unity doing funny voices? The bots talk, but they sound like a bad robot impression of the person they're a copy of. She could probably make the voices better, but it's funnier this way (especially Speed Bot).
      • Is Unity Jewish (the tie-in with "Golem")? Yes, the legends of the golem are explicitly why she makes "Mechanical Golems". The Wraith is Jewish by heritage, but Unity is a practicing Jew as well. She even has a little bit of an accent due to English not being her native language (although, no grammatical errors as she's perfectly fluent).
      • How did Unity wind up as an enemy of not 1, but 2 dudes made of fire? It's actually 3 dudes, except of those 3, only 1 is actually made of fire. The first is Magman - one of the Magmen who invaded in FFA #12, and that fight is the source of animosity. The second is the Radioactivist, his odd appearance really is just his gross, orange skin (caused by the nuclear energies that power him) - he was a weird creepy fanboy of the Freedom Five, and became kind of a stalker with regards to Unity once she joined the group. In an event where a bunch of robot drones were attacking a nuclear plant, the FF and Unity went to stop them, and he followed them there. He got dosed with a bunch of radiation when the drones caused some part of it to overload, turning him into the weird creature he is now - for which he blames Unity and the FF. The third is Char (originally going to be called "Firearm" but that was a bit too on-the-nose) - he shows up at Fort Adamant during Termi-Nation (he'd been a test subject there) and winds up fighting Unity (hints that he'll be in the upcoming environment deck as her nemesis, along with other mini-nemeses for the other heroes involved in that event).
      • Is pink her favorite color or does she just default to that given the glow when she uses her power? It's kind of the reverse of the second option - pink is her favorite color and her power signature is pink for that reason.
      • Are the pink hair streaks that Termi-Nation Unity has related to her interactions with Chokepoint (who also has pink hair)? She'll never admit it, but it's not a coincidence.
      • Unity is described as Israeli, but most of them serve in Israel's armed forces; did Unity serve in this way? No, she left the country right around the time that she would have been expected to serve (helped out by Tachyon's explanation of what she would be doing instead) - that didn't go over super well, but her service as a superhero kind of mitigates it.
      • When does Platform Bot make its appearance? Is that the real Baron Blade? Did she actually encounter an MDP or was she just working off of descriptions? During Vengeance, it's a Blade-bot (this is while Blade and Legacy are in the Realm of Discord), and MDPs are more common than just the FFA #1 event, so most people would be familiar with them even though she obviously wasn't there for that early appearance.
      • Did she build Augustus and if so, why couldn't she make him understandable? He's a library bot she built specifically to understand a coded transmission they'd received. She did this too well and he only speaks in code.
      • How'd she wind up in the glass prison on her incap art (this is Arcanist Lupus' limerick question mentioned in the show notes - right around 44:45)? Revo-Corp captured her at one point and used that room to keep her away from any metal that she could use to build anything. Other heroes break her out eventually.
      • Is she in a relationship with anybody (or even just have a crush on anyone)? She's younger than the other heroes (18 to her early 20s the whole time from her introduction in the mid-'90s until OblivAeon - gotta love how comic-book time works), and has been on a lot of dates (mostly guys, a few girls, even an alien once), but nothing really lasts until fairly late in the Multiverse storyline when she starts pursuing a relationship with a hero, Randall Butler (Benchmark!), he's a few years older than her, but not a whole lot, and both have a history with Revo-Corp to bond over.
      • Most golems seem purely mechanical - Freedom Six Unity has a skeleton, Termi-Nation Unity's incap art shows them side by side (presumably the creation of the Golem Unity), what all is going on? Chronological: TN Incap art with her hooked up to a Unity Bot is an event from a fight with Biomancer and he had made one of his flesh golems with some mechanical bits, but he was unable to replicate her powers - he's trying to steal her powers and put them in his creation without removing her brain (he's stopped before he can try this, it probably would have left Unity brain-dead). Next, in the Iron Legacy timeline Biomancer attempted this same thing, also she and Mr. Fixer had become close friends due to the circumstances of them being in hiding, and him mentoring her, etc. Eventually, Unity is mortally wounded in a fight with the Iron Hand (Legacy's guards/shock troops). Fixer remembers the Biomancer incident and tracks him down and makes him do a full transfer of her mind. She dies, Fixer buries her, then the Unity bot comes online and he tells it that she's really Unity, only patched up with metal and stuff. She has some inklings that she's not really herself (moreso after Fixer's death and she takes his cap), but she never really gets a chance to come to terms with that before the end of the Multiverse.
    • Future:
      • Tactics - Unity is part of the Freedom Five in all but name (despite the name not changing). The team members all have a FV logo on their belts, hers is FVI (the "I" is for "intern" obviously, what, that looks like it's a Roman 6? That's funny.) The guys end by saying that she'll eventually be an official member of the Freedom Five, and putting a bit of a lampshade on that statement - foreshadowing a death/retirement?
      • RPG - she leaves the Freedom Five after OblivAeon. She's gotten an offer from Revo-Corp (obviously under non-Blade management now, right?) doing science stuff, but also as a part of their team, the Paradigms (with Benchmark - they're not a Setback/Expatriette pair yet, but it's still furthering their relationship).
    • Future Questions:
      • Do the golems run off programming or just off her powers? Does she program them with her power? Does she have to split her focus among all of the active bots? Range/duration of her golems if she leaves or is knocked out? Does she actually see her bots as characters? Is Mr. Chomps inspired by a trip to Insula Primalis or just her interest in dinosaurs? This can be summed up as "how do her powers work?" and like many other examples in prior episodes, the answer is "nobody knows". Tachyon hasn't been able to figure out the source of her power, as far as everything appears she's a normal human but she can make these bots with her mind. There's a reason this question was saved for the Future section of the podcast, though. The answer will appear in future issues of Sentinel Comics (in the RPG timeline). Here we go: in her family backstory we hear about how Unity's mother, Mira, was injured in the Yom Kippur War. There was a powerful entity, referred to as a Chaos Witch, Rose Griggs, who was drawn there. Rose was blowing stuff up with her power, and some of the shrapnel from that was what injured Mira (and some is still in her hip, the source of her persistent limp after her recovery). This didn't effect Mira, but some of the latent power coalesced during her pregnancy with Devra and that's where her power came from - she's a "magically powered" hero, despite the technological appearance of how it manifests.

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Vengeance Five/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page 17
    • Baron Blade:
    • Fright Train:
      • Steven Graves enlisted on the same day and was put in the same squad in boot camp as Tyler Vance and they knew pretty much immediately that they weren't going to be friends. Some comrades-in-arms stuff along with their rivalry, but not ever really friendly (like, they're never going to go to a movie together, but the rivalry pushed both of them to be better than they would have been without it). Vance is very by-the-book and Graves more of an ends-justify-the-means.
      • After boot camp they get deployed in the same platoon, with Vance eventually taking a leadership role. Graves bristles a bit at having to take orders from him, but isn't openly insubordinate or anything.
      • Action in the middle-east at one point sees Graves injured in a firefight. Vance stays with him while the rest of the platoon falls back, ultimately holding out for 4 hours until support arrived. This was a bit of a bonding moment for them and is an exemplar of our the early Bunker comics worked.
      • Graves gets an honorable discharge following this (citing his injuries) and kind of just wound up wandering a bit, getting work where he could. He's a big guy with a fairly specific set of skills, though, which didn't really translate to civilian life outside of certain industries. He went into private security and worked for a number of "military consulting forces" - that is, he was a mercenary working for a number of groups - some legit, if sometimes shady (oil companies, "private intelligence agencies", etc.) others more shady (drug runners). The level of shade was kind of steadily on a lighter-to-darker trajectory, though. He's good at what he does, though, and eventually gets head-hunted by an anonymous outside group (private, covert wetwork stuff, paid by dead-drops).
      • Part of this latest contract involves him agreeing to chemical and mechanical enhancement, and he's up for this as part of the big payout promised. Unfortunately for him, the experimental procedures fail and leave his body just a wreck. He's got to stay in the lab for further study/repair. Of course, this private security force is backed by Revo-Corp, surprising nobody here. The group has no official name, but Revo-Corp will refer to it as their "ghosts" when necessary. This was the same experimental project that gave Setback his non-luck-related powers (see Setback episode for a note on how Baron Blade's, Setback's, and Fright Train's outfits were all variations on the same theme due to the tie-in to this project).
      • The data collected from the success of Setback allowed them to "fix" Graves' body. This partial success, combined with some mechanical enhancements make him the monstrosity we know and love as Fright Train as a member of the "ghosts". The first mission is to infiltrate a F.I.L.T.E.R. base.
      • Aside for F.I.L.T.E.R. stuff: the Federal Initiative to Limit Terrorism by Extraterrestrial Races started to combat alien threats (given that all the alien appearances to date had been threats. More on them in an upcoming episode for them (in the next month?).
      • The "ghosts" wind up getting wiped out - F.I.L.T.E.R. is just too used to dealing with "powered" entities, so a group of normal soldier types is not much of a threat. Fright Train and Char are the only ones to survive, but are captured and wind up in the Block.
      • Blade breaks out of prison and starts assembling his villain army. Part of this plan involves contacting prisoners in the Block and letting them know that he can blow a hole in a wall, so if there's an opportunity (during, say, a prison riot) he can get a lot of them out. Fright Train and others (who appear in Vengeance decks) escape.
    • Ermine:
      • Cassandra Lilya appears in the Rook City deck as a young person (the little blonde girl on Blighted Streets). This would be set after the Black Fist era, but before "Slim" Walker would be Mr. Fixer (thus the card's flavor text). The hoodlum on the card murders her parents and takes their stuff. She survives and her family's wealth still has her set up for life. Having all the money she could ever need leaves her pretty spoiled, though.
      • As stated in her bio, she was a contemporary of Maia Montgomery, running in the same social circles and attending the same events, but neither really respects the other. From Maia's perspective, Cassandra just gets everything that she wants without having to do anything for it (and once Maia becomes the Wraith it becomes even more pronounced as at least she's doing something to help people). Cassandra is resentful that Maia still has her parents, looks down on her for not having as much money as she does, and also for how Maia can't understand what Rook City's really like - this last one heavily influenced by her thrill seeking exploits as the famous thief, Ermine.
      • She has so much stuff accessible to her without effort, due to her wealth, and so loves taking what she isn't supposed to have as well. Then she tries to pull a job at the Rook City Museum of Art and History. They had a display of one of the world's largest diamonds, so she breaks in to take it. The Wraith happened to be patrolling nearby at the time, however, and handily defeats Ermine (who, being essentially a car burglar, wasn't really up to snuff in combat) and ties her up for the authorities. Wraith unmasks her before leaving, however, and so now knows her identity (and gets no small amount of entertainment from the knowledge).
      • In a shocking turn of comic-book vigilante logic, however, the authorities can't actually prosecute her because there's no evidence that she's actually committed a crime - only that she was tied up in the museum. She's still outed as Ermine, however, which kind of ruins her life as a socialite. So, she abandons that and just goes fully into the life of Ermine, setting up safe houses and whatnot. She's now got a vendetta against the Wraith, but it's actually to her advantage to have been stopped, since the museum itself has long been a front for one of the Chairman's criminal efforts (centered on high-quality forgeries of traveling exhibits that come in the door - the Fence is currently the museum's curator). Cassandra likely would have wound up dead somewhere if she'd succeeded in stealing from the Organization.
      • She continues in her life of crime for a while after this, until she's contacted by Baron Blade during his recruitment drive - receiving a nice hand-written invitation to join up and get vengeance on the Wraith.
    • Proletariat:
      • Aleksandr Tsarev was a soldier during WWII who was approached after the war to be part of a top secret project involving a space-rock the Red Army had recovered from a Nazi facility (they'd found it in a synagogue that had kept it for centuries prior to that - legends surrounded it involving the creation of golems, although not without cost). Generally, being exposed to the rock would cause a person's cellular structure to tear itself apart, but the Soviet scientists found a way to expose people to it "safely" (with a certain degree of confidence). They recognized that, if they were successful, their test subject would have great power, so they needed volunteers who were true believers. That was Aleks.
      • His body responded to the energies by his cells reproducing rapidly, his body bloating and tearing itself apart. At first the scientists figured this was another failure, but he survived (although still quite messy up to that point - it took months of medical treatment for him to recover, seemingly back to normal). He was put back into circulation as a normal soldier again since he was a good one before and, hey, at least they didn't lose him.
      • Once during combat training, however, he was struck more violently than usual (could have been expected to have broken some bones if he was still an average soldier). Instead of being injured, however, his body reacted by absorbing the blow and splitting off a duplicate of him. So now there's one of him standing there with the fatigues and everything and another just wearing his underwear (I mean, we're still in the old days of comics so he wasn't totally nude - it set the precedent that very closely-worn items could get duplicated too).
      • Clone mechanics: the experiences of copies are shared, thoughts and sensory information are continuous between bodies. With training (and the scientists were quick to jump back on board once they saw what his power was) he got better at dealing with the multiple-viewpoints-at-once thing and also better control over the duplication process (copying clothes and equipment intentionally, getting at least a few clones out without needing to take a big hit first).
      • He's now getting into his late 30s, however, and the leadership doesn't want to lose access to this power just by him aging out of usefulness before a major conflict comes along that he would be of most utility. So, they cryogenicaly freeze him and hide him in a secret bunker in Siberia. Eventually all of the scientists die off before this opportunity came about, though, and so he was forgotten.
      • That is, except for the rumors of a secret super weapon that had come to the attention of a certain Fyodor Ramonat who had known some of those scientists. Ivan found references to this in his father's notes and eventually tracked it down and woke him up. Aleksandr is ready to go now that he's been activated, and so Ivan tells him how he's going to be fighting Americans after all this time.
    • Friction:
      • Krystal Lee's time as an intern for Meredith Stinson, how she was fired, and how she stole a speed suit can be found in the Tachyon episode.
      • After she left the lab, she's angry and wants payback. She knew who Tachyon was, obviously, and she took the steps to contact Baron Blade herself. Eventually, she gets a form letter back turning her down. She uses the speed suit in Mordengrad to fight her way through a bunch of the Blade Battalion to prove herself (although she runs into a lot more stuff than Tachyon would and generally just not showing much control). Blade and the others discussed above come out to deal with her, but she still can't really control/stop herself.
      • Blade manages to take her down eventually and they analyze her suit, for which she takes credit, but he also offers to develop devices to help her not be so dangerous to herself (although also coming with the risk of winding up in even worse shape than she would have otherwise if things go wrong).
      • Given the potential here and her desire for payback, he offers her Vengeance! With the addition to her to the group he realizes that he now has a core "team" to be foils for the Freedom Five specifically and so they now become the Vengeful Five.
    • Vengeance:
      • This was a crossover event. There was a specific Vengeance limited series too, but it was bigger than that and was a major imprint on every title that Sentinel Comics was putting out at the time. It involved a lot of villains appearing outside of their normal context (a Dark Watch villain fighting the Prime Wardens, for example).
      • It marks a specific moment in the comics timeline as it was so ubiquitous, but it only really had minor repercussions down the line. It started with Baron Blade destroying FFHQ, prompting the building of Freedom Tower and he lost his scarring at the end in the Realm of Discord, but it wasn't a major turning point for anybody but him.
    • Post-Vengeance:
      • Baron Blade - Already covered in his episode.
      • Fright Train - Still doing minor villain stuff for anybody who will pay. Eventually he winds up in the Block again, but this time F.I.L.T.E.R. recognizes his work and he basically gets a job offer, doing similar stuff to what he was doing with the "ghosts" before his first stint there (we see him working with Sergeant Steel at one point, he's paid to bust into Freedom Tower as a distraction later, etc.).
      • Ermine - Goes to prison. She's captured during Vengeance and just winds up behind bars until right around the Omnitron IV events, when she escapes. Baron Blade puts out a call for people to recover parts from the facility and she breaks out to take him up on that, figuring that she can just get in and get out without having to fight anybody. She also gets in on the "distraction" job that Fright Train was doing over at Freedom Tower. She gets caught again and winds up right back in prison, though.
      • Proletariat - Right near the end of Vengeance, a big event (just prior to Blade and Legacy fighting in the RoD) is that Proletariat becomes aware of Blade's deception regarding his connection to the Soviet cause. He then goes off by himself back to his homeland to find himself and what remains of his cause. He largely just fades into the background.
      • Friction - The changes to her suit result in a catastrophic failure during Vengeance, burns out/gets atomized, never to be seen again.
    • Questions:
      • Friction's bio says that she was turned down by Blade initially, who was his first choice to fill her "spot" in the team? As stated, a core "team" wasn't the original point.
      • How was it determined which mini-nemeses appeared in whose deck? There isn't a working relationship between the mini-nemeses and "their" villain (like, the Hippo isn't working for Friction), but they're kind of grouped by who showed up in the same stories. Example: Proletariat's deck has more "thinker" villains since Blade was specifically trying to keep the fiction of his Soviet ideals intact and needed people who could maintain that around him. There will be a long Interlude about more mini-nemeses stuff. Tag your questions on these as Nemesis when submitting. This includes the VotM ones.
      • What do the Vengeful Five think of one another? They're all down with Blade's plan to kill Legacy (even if just to humor him), but they don't really gel as a team like the Freedom Five do. Proletariat operates by himself because it's better to get out of his way and let him do his thing. Friction is kind of painful to be around. Ermine prefers the sneaky approach. It's hard to keep up with Fright Train as he just barrels through everything in his way. There's just not a lot of synergy going on in how they fight. They all more or less respect Blade, but that's about it. Ermine and Fright Train (the two most adapted to "normal" life who survive) work together again later. Good line: Fright Train trusts Ermine about as far as he can throw her, but that's pretty far.
      • In the bios we find that Ermine and Friction were both contacted by letter, did Blade himself write these? Why letters? Delivery method? Delivered by small rockets. He's good at reading and manipulating people, so he recognizes that a written invitation with nice calligraphy is the right recruitment method to get Ermine on board. The form letter Friction got really is a form letter that he sends to the stream of minor baddies offering their services and Friction's written offer didn't wow him.
      • How strong is Fright Train? Like, way strong, bro. Totes swole.
      • How "in control" is Fright Train? He makes questionable choices in that he goes with the easy choice rather than the right one. The drugs he was exposed to in the experiments don't make him evil, but make him more impulsive and clouds his already shaky judgement. He always loves trains, though. He's fairly in control - he's still able to rationalize, but he's just never been good at it. He's less likely to consider an action before acting on it.
      • Steven Graves becomes a hero as the new Bunker in the Iron Legacy timeline, does he do anything similar during OblivAeon? During the OblivAeon fighting, the only Vengeful Five member who does anything notable is Baron Blade as Luminary. Graves is in some small backwater in the Southwest, laying low until he's out of money again. Some Aeon Men show up (as they do everywhere) and he punches them, but then has to move on as it's outed him as this scary thing that the people maybe should fear. So, he technically did a thing, but it didn't contribute to the overall story.
      • How did Proletariat not get a hero deck for OblivAeon (citing that his motivation isn't a villainous one)? He wasn't a major character during OblivAeon. Given infinite time and resources, it'd be fun to do decks for everybody, but it's sort of the case that only the major villains/events get their own decks, and that goes for the heroes too and he just wasn't important for this. He fought some Aeon Men (because they're ubiquitous), but didn't fight OblivAeon.
      • Is Proletariat's vendetta against Absolute Zero just due Blade's description of AZ's employment by the government and the parallels to Proletariat's own situation or more due to the indoctrination of Proletariat against the US back in the day? Both are accurate. Proletariat's attitude is more that he needs to defeat AZ so that he's not actively fighting him, thus allowing him to save this unwitting stooge of the capitalist dogs. He sees AZ as a victim.
      • How many clones can Proletariat have at a time? He shares senses and experiences with all of them, so it's difficult to manage them. He doesn't have a physical maximum, but it gets harder for him to maintain them mentally. The most we see in the Multiverse era is once when we see him fighting Haka and it's about a dozen. If he gets up to around 20 it starts to be pretty mindless. Twenty is about as many as he'd go to if there's a singular goal (falling from a height, trying to land on somebody, lets get as many bodies as possible to do that or when fighting the Aeon Men and only needs each body to swing the hammer at the guy in front of him - no more complicated than that). Finesse isn't really possible above around 6.
      • Why does he have a vendetta against AZ (if at all)? What all can he duplicate (costumes for sure, what about the hammers or anything else like one of Blade's death rays)? First part already covered. His power is really hand-wavy on how it works (much like Absolute Zero's) - with practice he learned to copy clothes and simple hand-held objects. That's why he uses a hammer, but not even a simple gun.
      • Blade's deck has flavor text from Exordium, what's its relation to Vengeance? Exordium is a pre-Vengeance storyline - a limited series detailing the recruitment phase of the plan.
      • In the AZ episode it's mentioned that Proletariat isn't really a nemesis of AZ in the way of most nemeses, did he appear in comics prior to the Vengeance plot and, if so, who did he fight? No, he was new for this. Despite the long history of Commie-busting in the comics he didn't feature in them. The most notable Soviet character in the comics from back in the day was Iron Curtain, who didn't even make it into the game (only appearing in some cover art they did - showing the current Legacy's first appearance). (This is Justice Comics #102 seen on the second page of the "Hero Challenge Achievements" PDF on the GTG website, True Believers!)
      • How big a deal, in-universe, are the mini-nemeses? Did Blade contact them individually or did they seek him out when they heard what was going on (like, why get the Hippo to fight Haka when there's this perfectly serviceable French jerk willing to fight him)? Each of them has their own reasoning. Common thread among them is "vengeance", though. This implies some slight or wrong done to them by the hero, which is why the Haka example is fitting - Haka didn't do anything to Ambuscade, he's just after money and glory as far as going after Haka is concerned.
      • Are there any Vengeance villains who betrayed Baron Blade in some way? "Betray" is strong and nobody really backstabbed him in the way implied. Zhu Long was there for his own reasons, though, as are some others, but it's not like anybody's really there for Baron Blade. He just used their pre-existing motivations for his own ends. One exception for somebody whose presence kind of backfired on him was the Seer. He's the one who opened the portal to the Realm of Discord and the events there with Legacy were what kind of resulted in the Vengeance plot falling apart. It's not an intentional betrayal, but still a problem for him.
    • Future:
      • Tactics: Proletariat shows up, Ermine, Fright Train, and poor Friction don't (although Fright Train appears in some art). Proletariat is working for whoever is running Revo-Corp at the time, but we don't know why yet. He's not really a villain, but he's doing his own thing to further his ideals.
      • RPG: Can't really go into anything yet. Proletariat has a role (some roles?) to play. They have to save some content for until after the RPG comes out at which point they can circle back around to do some Interludes or something. There are plans for them regarding what they are going to do with these characters and what we, the players, will do with them (an intentionally tantalizing comment here at the end).

Sources


Visionary/References

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Artwork

  • The card "Prophetic Vision" features the first appearance of Iron Legacy.
  • The villain on "Demoralization" is The Toy Master, one of the Dreamer's projections.
  • Although hard to make out more than her hair to indicate who it is, "Mind Spike" shows Visionary defeating Citizen Dawn during the latter's failed invasion of Megalopolis. The flavor text on the card has Visionary calling out Dawn ard does reference Sunrise #11 which is the series for Dawn's invasion.

Confirmed

  • The Dreamer is a young version of The Visionary from the present-day timeline.
  • The Visionary's hero bio in the Enhanced Edition rulebook reveals that she was not the only subject of Project Cocoon to be subjected to the PSY-200 injection process. However, she was the only survivor.
  • Any time someone time travels (to the past at least) they essentially create a new timeline. Visionary is one of the most powerful characters in SotM. When she time travels to the past, she enters a timeline in which the events that lead to her time traveling don't happen. On the trip to the past, a version of Visionary from a third timeline who is evil, but has been defeated in some way, latches on as an unwelcome passenger into the past. Visionary has to spend a considerable amount of energy keeping Dark Visionary in check. Gen Con 2016 Q&A

To Other Works

  • Visually, the Visonary is almost completely identical to Moondragon, a Marvel Comics female superhero.
  • As a powerful psychic with a dangerous dark-side, the Visionary is very reminiscent of Marvel Comic's Jean Gray.
  • The flavor text of "Wrest the Mind" is a reference to Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope.
  • The art on "Mind Spike" is reminiscent of the panel from X-Men #25, during the "Fatal Attractions" storyline, where Professor Xavier (a bald telepath) mind-wipes Magneto (who, like Citizen Dawn, can be described as a proponent of the superiority of powered people over normal people) - even down to the level of detail of the hand positions of the characters.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Letters Page 31 - Visionary
    • How does she show up in AA's "Rhapsody of Vigor" card (citing FFA #10) when her first appearance is listed as FFA #16? This is another error in the bio - her first appearance is in Freedom Five #422 followed by a limited series New Memories that went into her backstory.
    • About when did the Dreamer event happen? Nightmare World happened pre-Vengeance. The apparitions start showing up well before that, but the Dreamer storyline was used to tie up loose ends.
    • Does Nightmare World tie into the art on "Fixed Point"? Not really - the Dreamer event was the reveal about what was happening regarding the projections, but Fixed Point is tied to a Time Cataclysm story when the heroes find out a lot about timelines/realities and fixed points in general. The Time Cataclysm is represented as an Environment, but it's really more of an event that leads to weirdness being kind of generally present until OblivAeon.
    • Where did she get the stuffed ape and what's the deal with the ape in FFA #4? They're the same ape even though they look different. One looks big because the Dreamer made him big. The Ape was a recurring villain from way back that was later revealed to be one of the more persistent projections. In the Silver Age stories it was just like "there's this ape that keeps showing up with a magic glowing crystal and we have to get it away from it" because, sure enough, if they took the crystal away it would disappear. This was kind of her "main" projection and it's just patterned on this stuffed toy she got from her parents - an ape with a green plastic gem in its chest (there's a whole line of these animal+colored gem toys). Every projection is based on something she's familiar with.
    • How much does the ruptured blood vessel mentioned in her bio hold her back? Is that why she can't time travel again? It's not just the ruptured blood vessel, but fighting Dark Visionary that's holding her back (or Dark Visionary fighting her later on). We don't really see her at full power in the card game. Time travel was difficult enough the first time, however, that doing so again would probably kill her.
    • Citizen Dawn seems interested in Visionary - we know that Visionary defeated her at one point, but was that a lucky shot or what? Why does she send Hammer and Anvil after her? It definitely helped that Visionary was taking her on in the middle of a large-scale fight and it wasn't one-on-one. Visionary is categorically more powerful than Dawn, but is operating with restrictions (mentioned previously) and so taking a big shot like this is dangerous for her. Visionary is probably their most powerful character if she wasn't being hobbled by circumstance. Hammer and Anvil were sent because they're her go-to henchmen and, if Visionary won't join the Citizens, she's not too put out if they were to kill her.
    • Who is Major Flay and what's their connection? Mentioned previously, he was in Project Cocoon and then she killed him.
    • What consequences/complications were there from Dark Visionary finally being banished from her mind? This wound up being a major set-piece of the Cosmic Conflict event. Argent Adept has to make personal sacrifices to accomplish it (and obviously Dark Mind wouldn't be a Scion without this event). There will be more on this stuff with regards to Visionary in the Future section.
    • What kind of music does she like? Favorite artist/album? How does is feel to time travel? Time travel feels moist - like sitting in a sauna - with 17 hangovers. "The act of time travel is not fun." She gets super into modern music of our time that wouldn't have happened in her reality due to different cultural influences. More experimental stuff than pop, though. Plug for the Visionary song on the Lazer Ryderz soundtrack.
    • What are the capabilities/limitations of her powers, she seems really overpowered? As mentioned, she's one of the most powerful humans in the setting (except for the actively dying thing - the self damage on stuff like "Brain Burn" is showing how exerting herself is bad). She's playing a large balancing act.
    • How does she control matter itself (like in "Twist the Ether")? It's part of her telekinetic or reality-altering powers.
    • What's it like when she's controlling your mind? She could black your mind out and puppet the body, but generally the victim is completely aware of what's going on and can fight it since that's easier.
    • How did Project Cocoon function? Did all the subjects know one another (did she know Truth and Dare)? Could they go outside? In her timeline, Project Cocoon kids were mostly kept together, but could frequently be isolated from one another. There were versions of Truth and Dare there, but they were different. This was a pretty large organization. They could go outside, but that became much less frequent as things fell apart.
    • Why did she only run into one other version of herself - are there other versions of her out there with like 20 copies in her head? It was exceptionally odd that it happened at all - it just so happened that the Dark version was killed at the same "time" that she was reality hopping already and could take advantage of it. Even with the Multiverse there's not going to be a 20-mind version.
    • When is the card art showing Dark Visionary vs. Visionary (example: we know that "Suggestion" shows Dark Visionary messing with Bugbear, but the clothes still look like the normal version)? A lot of stuff is Dark Visionary popping out from being controlled briefly until Vanessa can get her under control again. Clarification on costume: the normal blue outfit is cloth, the black Dark outfit is latex (not leather). Even if Dark Visionary can exert control briefly before taking over, there is also a time after she's taken over that she still appears in the original outfit.
    • After the Voss battle she sees a bunch of visions of alternate futures ("Precognition") does this happen after every victory? It's not tied to victories, she's constantly having to deal with these visions of the future (thus her hero name).
    • Does she have any advice for getting rid of evil copies of yourself? She's not a good person to ask as her plan to deal with it kind of failed spectacularly. Argent Adept would be a better person to get advice from.
    • Her nemesis is the Dreamer, but that's a one-time event, right? The Dreamer event is a one-off, but it's the culmination of a long string of Projection encounters.
    • Who does she fight in her normal solo book? The Chinese government? The Chinese government doesn't know anything about her that would make them care given that she's from an alternate reality. There's mostly stuff covered in the overview section - Project Cocoon, Bugbear, stuff happening on the fringes of other books' stories, etc.
    • Does Citizen Dawn hate Expatriette or Visionary more? Expat - that's a personal failing. Visionary just happens to be somebody who got the upper hand on her once.
    • If Dark Vis was able to banish Gloomweaver so easily, why isn't that level of power represented in the card game? For one thing, she's generally hiding her power. For another, that was a burst of power as she gained control before she started actively suppressing Visionary and concentrating on not dying.
    • Could Visionary develop the same Projection powers that the Dreamer has? Maybe (see the "Decoy Projection" as an example of something like that), but it's mostly a primary power of the canon reality's Vanessa Long rather than the telekinesis/telepathy/prophetic visions thing that Visionary has going on. More on Dreamer/Vanessa in the Future section.
    • Where does the Dreamer get the Nightmare energy for her projections (and is there a way for the Cult of Gloom to get their hands on some)? They kind of already have access to it since Gloomweaver, the Nightmare Walker, already draws power from nightmares. This same kind of power is what fueled the Dreamer's power to manifest her dreams.
    • She comes from a future that's farther down the line than OblivAeon, but after OblivAeon time travel is shut down; does this mean that there are realities where OblivAeon didn't attack and is therefore not de-shattered afterwards? No reality is destined to have OblivAeon happen sometime in the future. Until he decides enough is enough and attacks every reality. The times of realities don't neatly line up - it's not necessarily the case that Visionary actually moved "back in time" but could easily be just that she moved laterally into a reality that happened to be running several years behind her own. Time is weird/non-linear anyway and that's before the whole Shattering thing.
    • If she's from another reality, why didn't she get sent back there after OblivAeon like the heroes that came through Nightmist's gate? Who said that the alternate-reality heroes went back to their own realities?
    • "Psychic Maelstrom" and several other cards show her with malevolent grin or otherwise looking/acting pretty shady, is that to foreshadow Dark Visionary, is she already Dark Visionary, or is she normally a little bit of an anti-hero? It's either after Dark Vis takes over or, if earlier, moments when she's able to assert a little control briefly.
    • Are there other Visionaries who have traveled between realities? Nope (or at least not ones that we see - infinite realities and all of that).
    • Does her gaining powers as a Fixed Point mean that she'll eventually be more powerful than, say, OblivAeon? No - it's not like there's one Vanessa Long and that powers up as each reality gets to the Fixed Point - it's just that each reality has a unique iteration of her, but all of them will gain powers.
    • Why is she bald? Project Cocoon - the Dreamer has hair because she was rescued from it.
    • Is there something hidden in Visionary that Cocoon did that will come back later? There's no latent programming or anything that would come back later.
    • Any other notable successes from Project Cocoon besides Visionary, Truth, and Dare? Major Flay, young Vanessa Long kind of, not much else in terms of characters we've seen. She probably came across more of them in her adventures, but the success rate was lower in the canon reality than in her own (lack of funding/official status). More in the Future section, though. Speaking of which...

Sources


Voidsoul/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Vyktor/References

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Confirmed

  • This is the same Vyktor in The Thorathian Armada, First Lt. Vyktor. After some major … life changes Confirmed by Christopher at Gathering of Heroes 2014

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • From Letters Page Interlude 7 - Nemeses
    • Now that Vyktor is on his own, what happened to Voss's other lieutenant (banished along with him by Nightmist)? Why is Vyktor more of a sadist now? He was always a cold-blooded sadist, so this wasn't any kind of character derailment. He might have seemed more mellow just because he's operating under Voss's direction, but he's always been terrible. Field Lieutenant Tamar died during the initial Voss invasion arc. Vyktor was the one behind the gene-bound slaves, apparently - tearing apart people (aliens) and putting them back together as the gene-bound forces.

Sources


Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Wager Master/References

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Artwork

  • On "An Unwise Wager", Expatriette is being shown what she could have been like if she had manifested powers like her parents expected - called "Citizen Dusk" (Letters Page Episode 4).

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • As a small, conniving, mischievous, and often sinister being of bizarre and titanic power, the Wager Master draws comparisons to DC’s Mister/Master Mxysptlk, a classic adversary of Superman. He is also similar to Marvel’s Impossible Man.
  • Wager Master’s electrified hand-buzzer is a reference to the DC villain The Joker, who is famous for using such a “prank” to deadly effect.
  • The art of “Not All He Seems” depicts Wager Master’s eyes stretching forth in excitement, his tongue hanging like a dog’s. This is classic visual trope from the cartoons of the forties and fifties, first made famous in the 1943 Tex Avery cartoon Red Hot Riding Hood.
  • Wager Master’s giant monster form on “Losing to the Odds” is a parody of the Japanese kaiju monster Godzilla. The card also shows Wager Master shooting lasers from his eyes. While the mainstream versions of Godzilla have never had this power, the 1978 Hanna-Barbera cartoon version did.
  • The super-powered version of Expatriette pictured on “An Unwise Wager” bears a strong resemblance to the Marvel heroine Psyloche.
  • “Playing Dice with the Cosmos” portrays a cluster of planets shaped like dice. Aside from an obvious visual pun, this may also be a reference to the Bizarro World from DC comics, which was cube-shaped.
  • “What Do You Really Know?” is the first time Ryan Frost’s head has ever been fully seen on SOTM card art.
  • The impossible staircase depicted on “Breaking the Rules” is a reference to the MC Escher lithograph Relativity.
  • “Unanswerable Question” portrays Wager Master as a sarcastic game-show host and Setback as an unwilling contestant with his life on the line. This is a classic superhero peril, made famous by villainous characters like the Joker (DC), the Riddler (DC), Arcade (Marvel), and Mojo (Marvel).

Sources


Wagner Mars Base/References

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Confirmed

  • The card "Pervasive Red Dust" destroys equipment cards. The card art shows Visionary shaking the red dust out of her boot. Mechanically, the Visionary can't be effected by "Pervasive Red Dust" as she doesn't have any equipment cards.
  • Among her other remarkable accomplishments, Dr. Meredith Stinson (Tachyon) is directly responsible for the fact that humanity finally got around to visiting Mars, and thus indirectly responsible for the existence of the Mars base. [1]

To Other Works

  • Space bases with self-destruct timers like Wagner are a common sci-fi trope. The film that truly popularized the idea was Ridley Scott's Alien.

Sources


Warden Hoefle/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources


Wraith/References

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Artwork

  • An early rendering of Spite appears on the card "Inventory Barrage." There are numerous differences between this rendering of Spite and the finalized version seen in the Rook City expansion, with the early version lacking the long right sleeve and coat-tail of Spite's official outfit. In addition, the early version has more pronounced gloves, sports a lighter color scheme, and doesn't have any hypodermic needles on his chest strap.
  • The device pictured in "Impromptu Invention" has become something of a running joke in the Sentinels franchise, appearing on numerous cards in various decks. It remains unknown what, if anything, it actually does.
  • The art on Wraith's incapacitated side seems to be an homage to the cover of Daredevil Vol. 2, Issue 3, where Daredevil crouches on a cathedral roof embracing a cross. The pictures are not exact copies however.
  • "Throat Jab" depicts Wraith elbowing a Macabre Spectre from The Dreamer's deck.
  • Freedom Six Wraith: The weapons on this card are very close to The Operative's
  • The Incap side of the Wraith's variant art pack card shows the Wraith standing over the bodies of comic supporting-cast characters Sara Scott and Eduardo López after their murder by Spite (see the Letters Page episode on the Wraith and the art on the Spite card Collateral Damage).

Confirmed

  • The Wraith is Jewish per Adam She is indeed Jewish, though I'd say her observance level is not high. Reform Judaism is probably accurate - crime doesn't keep the Sabbath, and I imagine her "night life" makes getting to Synagogue on time difficult. GtG forums
  • In the Iron Legacy timeline, The Wraith decides that the only way to get the resources necessary to fight Iron Legacy is to takeover the Organization for herself. She dispatches The Chairman and the Operative and assumes their power. Gen Con 2016 Q&A

To Other Works

  • The Wraith has many obvious similarities with DC Comic's Batman. Both characters are genius detectives that chose to take up crime-fighting as the result of a tragedy. Both use technology and martial arts in place of superpowers. Both have rich socialite alter-egos.
  • The Wraith is visually similar to Cassandra Cain, the second Batgirl.
  • Most, if not all, of the Wraith's equipment cards are analogous to tools used by Batman.
  • Freedom Six Wraith: Her incapacitated side may be an homage to this image in Batman: Knightfall, where Bane holds a broken Batman above his head.

Questions Answered on The Letters Page

  • Notes from Wraith Letters Page episode Letters Page Episode 2 written out by WalkingTarget:
    • Imbued Vitality for her Hair Dryer has a "cartoony voice that sounds like a hair dryer". Now that they're no longer in the Realm of Discord and their gear is no longer animated, she's still occasionally wondering "Is it still in there yelling its stupid hair dryer voice at me and being really eager to fight crime?" We have not yet seen the last of the hair dryer.

Sources


Writhe/References

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Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

Sources



Note: These are pulled via an automatic pull from CharacterName/References subpages of all the characters on the wiki. They are in alphabetical order by name.

Zhu Long/References

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Artwork

  • Zhu Long first appeared on the Mr. Fixer card “Pipe Wrench.” His card art seems to confirm that Long and the dragon pictured on Mr. Fixer’s “Overdrive” card are the same being.

Confirmed

Nothing Here Yet

To Other Works

  • Zhu Long is an homage, both in character and design, to classic “yellow peril” villain Fu Manchu
  • At his temple Zhu Long has a pool used to revive people as seen on the card Rites of a Revival. It is known having gone through this that Mr Fixer isn't himself upon his resurrection. This is similar to Lazurus Pit used by the Batman villlain Ra's Al Ghul

Sources